Georgia state primary 2016

Georgia state primary 2016 DEFAULT

Georgia held an election for the president of the United States on November 8, The Democratic and Republican parties held primary elections for president on March 1,

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Donald Trump (R) won Georgia in the general election.
  • In , Georgia had 16 electoral votes, which was 3 percent of the electoral votes up for grabs and 6 percent of the electoral votes needed to win the general election.
  • Between and , Georgia cast votes for the winning presidential candidate percent of the time. In that same time frame, Georgia supported Democratic candidates for president more often than Republican candidates, to percent. The state, however, supported Republican candidates in every election between and
  • Presidential primary elections in Georgia took place on March 1, Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary with percent of the vote. Donald Trump won the Republican primary with percent.
  • General election candidates

    See also: Ballot access for presidential candidates

    The candidate list below is based on an official list on the Georgia secretary of state website. The candidate names below appear in the order in which they were listed on the official list—not necessarily the order in which they appeared on the ballot in November. Write-in candidates were not included in the list below.

    Presidential candidates on the ballot in Georgia

    &#;Donald Trump/Mike Pence (Republican)
    &#;Gary Johnson/Bill Weld (Libertarian)
    &#;Hillary Clinton/Tim Kaine (Democratic)

    Results

    U.S. presidential election, Georgia,
    PartyCandidateVote&#;%VotesElectoral votes
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Democratic Hillary Clinton/Tim Kaine%1,,0
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Republican Green check mark transparent.pngDonald Trump/Mike Pence%2,,16
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Libertarian Gary Johnson/Bill Weld3%,0
    &#;&#;&#;&#;- Other/Write-in %22,0
    Total Votes4,,16
    Election results via: Federal Election Commission

    Pivot Counties

    See also: Pivot Counties: The counties that voted Obama-Obama-Trump from

    Ballotpedia identified counties that voted for Donald Trump (R) in after voting for Barack Obama (D) in and , in 34 states.[1] Collectively, Trump won these Pivot Counties by more than , votes, and had an average margin of victory of percent. The political shift in these counties could have a broad impact on elections at every level of government for the next four years.

    Historical election trends

    See also: Presidential election accuracy

    Below is an analysis of Georgia's voting record in presidential elections. The state's accuracy is based on the number of times a state has voted for a winning presidential candidate. The majority of statistical data is from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration and was compiled, here, by Ballotpedia, unless otherwise noted.

    Between and

    • Georgia participated in 30 presidential elections.
    • Georgia voted for the winning presidential candidate percent of the time. The average accuracy of voting for winning presidential candidates for all 50 states in this time frame was percent.[2]
    • Georgia voted Democratic percent of the time and Republican percent of the time.

    Third party vote

    In , Richard Nixon ran as the Republican, Hubert H. Humphrey ran as the Democrat, and George Wallace ran under the American Independent Party and won Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi.[3]

    *An asterisk indicates that that candidate also won the national electoral vote in that election.

    Election results

    U.S. presidential election, Georgia,
    PartyCandidateVote&#;%VotesElectoral votes
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Democratic Barack Obama/Joe BidenIncumbent%1,,0
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Republican Green check mark transparent.pngMitt Romney/Paul Ryan%2,,16
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Libertarian Gary Johnson/Jim Gray %45,0
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Write-in Write-in candidates %2,0
    Total Votes3,,16
    Election results via: Georgia Secretary of State

    U.S. presidential election, Georgia,
    PartyCandidateVote&#;%VotesElectoral votes
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Democratic Barack Obama/Joe Biden47%1,,0
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Republican Green check mark transparent.pngJohn McCain/Sarah Palin%2,,15
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Libertarian Bob Barr/Wayne Allyn Root %28,0
    &#;&#;&#;&#;Write-in Write-in candidates %2,0
    Total Votes3,,15
    Election results via: Georgia Secretary of State

    Electoral votes

    See also: Electoral College

    The president of the United States is not elected by popular vote but rather by electors in the Electoral College. In fact, when Americans vote for president, they are actually voting for a slate of electors selected by members of Democratic and Republican state parties or nominated in some other fashion. Under this system, which is laid out in Article 2, Section 1, of the Constitution, each state is allocated one electoral vote for every member of their congressional delegation, meaning one for each member of the U.S. House and one for each of their two Senators.

    Georgia electors

    In , Georgia had 16 electoral votes. Georgia's share of electoral votes represented 3 percent of the electoral votes up for grabs in the general election and 6 percent of the votes needed to be elected president. Republican electors in Georgia were selected by a Republican state central committee. Ballotpedia was not able to determine how Democratic electors in Georgia were selected.

    "Faithless electors"

    The U.S. Constitution does not dictate how presidential electors are to cast their votes, but, in general, electors are expected to vote for the winner of the popular vote in their state or the candidates of the party that nominated them to serve as electors. Electors who choose not to vote for the winner of the popular vote or the candidates of the party that nominated them are known as "faithless electors." Faithless electors are rare. Between and , there were only eight known instances of faithless electors.

    Several states have passed laws against faithless electors and require electors to vote for the winner of the popular vote in their state, for the candidate of the party that nominated them to serve as electors, or in accordance with any pledge they may have been required to make at the time of their nomination. In states with these types of laws, faithless electors can be fined or replaced, or their votes can be nullified.[5][6]

    Georgia was one of 20 states in without a law seeking to bind the votes of presidential electors.

    Down ballot races

    See also: Georgia elections,

    Below is a list of down ballot races in Georgia covered by Ballotpedia in

    Primary election

    Quick facts

    *The Georgia GOP includes a provision in its nominating rules allowing any candidate who wins 50 percent of the vote cast within the state or each of the congressional districts to receive all of the state’s at-large and congressional district delegates. For more on this provision, see here.

    Democrats

    Hillary Clinton won the Georgia Democratic primary with percent of the vote.[7] This was a substantial improvement over her performance against Barack Obama where she only won percent.[8] Clinton also swept the state except for one county; Bernie Sanders claimed that victory in Echols County.[9]

    According to exit polling from CNN, Clinton won with nearly every demographic group, including men, women, self-identified liberals and moderates and voters of all income and education levels. Eighty-five percent of African-American voters supported Clinton. Sanders narrowly outperformed with voters 29 years of age or younger and white men.[10]

    Republicans

    Donald Trump won the Georgia Republican primary with nearly 39 percent of the vote.[7]Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz followed with percent and percent, respectively.[9] According to NBC News, Trump and his allies spent less than $, in the state. This was significantly less than the $ million pro-Cruz forces spent in Georgia.[11]

    Nevertheless, Trump managed to win with a wide range of demographic groups, including men, women, voters of all ages, high school and college graduates and voters who identified as somewhat conservative or moderate. Rubio outperformed Trump with voters who had incomes of $, or more and postgraduate education. He also won with non-white voters.[12]

    Primary results

    Democrats

    Georgia Democratic Primary,
    CandidateVote&#;%VotesDelegates
    Green check mark transparent.pngHillary Clinton%,73
    Bernie Sanders %,29
    Martin O'Malley %2,0
    Michael Steinberg %1,
    Totals,
    Source:Georgia Secretary of State and CNN

    Republicans

    Georgia Republican Primary,
    CandidateVote&#;%VotesDelegates
    Green check mark transparent.pngDonald Trump%,42
    Marco Rubio %,16
    Ted Cruz %,18
    John Kasich %72,0
    Ben Carson %80,0
    Jeb Bush %7,0
    Chris Christie %1,0
    Carly Fiorina %1,0
    Lindsey Graham 0%0
    Mike Huckabee %2,0
    George Pataki 0%0
    Rand Paul %2,0
    Rick Santorum 0%0
    Totals1,,76
    Source:Georgia Secretary of State and CNN

    Candidate list

    Polls

    Democratic primary

    Democratic Party Democratic Party presidential primary polling (Georgia)
    PollHillary ClintonBernie SandersUnsure or OtherMargin of ErrorSample Size
    WSB-TV 2
    February 28,
    70%23%7%+/
    NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll
    February (No date range specified.)
    64%30%5%+/
    CBS News/YouGov
    February ,
    63%35%2%+/
    Landmark/RosettaStone
    February 26,
    %%%+/
    SurveyUSA/TEGNA/11Alive Atlanta
    February ,
    66%27%7%+/
    Opinion Savvy
    February ,
    57%%%+/
    WSB-TV/Landmark
    February 21,
    72%%%+/
    Public Policy Polling
    February ,
    60%26%13%+/
    WXIA-TV/Survey USA
    October ,
    73%16%10%+/-4
    Note: A "0%" finding means the candidate was not a part of the poll. The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to [email protected]

    Note: In October , Joe Biden announced that he would not run for president in During the same month, Jim Webb, Lincoln Chafee and Lawrence Lessig ended their campaigns for the presidential election in The Democratic polls below reflect polling during the time when their campaigns were still active, and it was widely expected that Biden would run in

    Democratic Party Democratic Party presidential favorability polling (Georgia)
    PollHillary ClintonBernie SandersJoe BidenMartin O'MalleyJim WebbLincoln ChafeeUnsure or OtherMargin of ErrorSample Size
    OpinionSavvy/Insider Advantage Poll for FOX 5 and the Morris News Service
    September 2,
    51%24%15%0%0%5%5%+/
    WSB/Landmark
    August 5,
    56%11%18%1%2%0%12%+/-4
    Note: A "0%" finding means the candidate was not a part of the poll. The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to [email protected]

    Republican primary

    Republican Party Republican Party presidential primary polling (Georgia)
    PollDonald TrumpMarco RubioTed CruzBen CarsonJohn KasichUnsure or OtherMargin of ErrorSample Size
    WSB-TV 2
    February 28,
    39%20%15%9%8%9%+/1,
    Opinion Savvy
    February ,
    %%%%%%+/
    Trafalgar Group
    February ,
    %%%%%%+/1,
    NBC News/WSJ/Marist Poll
    February (No date range specified.)
    30%23%23%9%9%6%+/
    CBS News/YouGov
    February ,
    40%22%29%7%2%0%+/-7
    SurveyUSA/TEGNA/11Alive Atlanta
    February ,
    45%19%16%8%6%6%+/
    Opinion Savvy
    February ,
    %%%%%%+/
    WSB-TV/Landmark
    February 21,
    %%%%%%+/
    Note: A "0%" finding means the candidate was not a part of the poll. The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to [email protected]
    Republican Party Republican Party presidential primary polling (Georgia)
    PollDonald TrumpTed CruzBen CarsonMarco RubioJeb BushCarly FiorinaChris ChristieJohn KasichMike HuckabeeRand PaulUnsure or OtherMargin of ErrorSample Size
    Opinion Savvy
    January 17,
    %%%%%%%%%%%+/
    Fox 5 Atlanta
    December 16,
    %%%12%6%%%%%%%+/
    WSB/Landmark
    December 10,
    %%%%%%0%%%<1%%+/
    Fox 5/Morris News Service
    November ,
    8%26%4%14%6%0%2%2%1%9%4%+/
    WXIA-TV/Survey USA
    October ,
    35%8%28%12%4%3%0%2%3%0%6%+/-4
    Note: A "0%" finding means the candidate was not a part of the poll. The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to [email protected]
    Republican Party Republican Party presidential favorability polling (Georgia)
    PollDonald TrumpJeb BushScott WalkerBen CarsonMike HuckabeeTed CruzMarco RubioJohn KasichChris ChristieRand PaulUnsure or OtherMargin of ErrorSample Size
    Landmark Communications/Rosetta Stone
    September 23,
    %%0%%%%%%0%%%+/
    OpinionSavvy/Insider Advantage Poll for FOX 5 and the Morris News Service
    September 2,
    34%11%2%25%5%6%2%3%2%0%10%+/
    WSB/Landmark
    August 5,
    34%12%10%8%8%5%5%5%3%2%8%+/-4
    FOX 5/Morris News
    August 3,
    30%17%5%10%7%6%3%3%3%3%13%+/
    Note: A "0%" finding means the candidate was not a part of the poll. The polls above may not reflect all polls that have been conducted in this race. Those displayed are a random sampling chosen by Ballotpedia staff. If you would like to nominate another poll for inclusion in the table, send an email to [email protected]

    Delegates

    Delegate selection

    See also: presidential nominations: calendar and delegate rules

    Democratic Party

    Democratic Party Logo.png

    Georgia had delegates at the Democratic National Convention. Of this total, were pledged delegates. National party rules stipulated how Democratic delegates in all states were allocated. Pledged delegates were allocated to a candidate in proportion to the votes he or she received in a state's primary or caucus. A candidate was eligible to receive a share of the state's pledged delegates if he or she won at least 15 percent of the votes cast in the primary or caucus. There were three types of pledged Democratic delegates: congressional district delegates, at-large delegates, and party leaders and elected officials (PLEOs). Congressional district delegates were allocated proportionally based on the primary or caucus results in a given district. At-large and PLEO delegates were allocated proportionally based on statewide primary results.[14][15]

    Fifteen party leaders and elected officials served as unpledged delegates. These delegates were not required to adhere to the results of a state's primary or caucus.[14][16]

    Georgia superdelegates

    See also: Superdelegates from Georgia, and Superdelegates and the Democratic National Convention

    Republican Party

    Logo-GOP.png

    Georgia had 76 delegates at the Republican National Convention. Of this total, 42 were district-level delegates (three for each of the state's 14 congressional districts). District-level delegates were allocated proportionally; the highest vote-getter in a congressional district received two of that district's delegates, and the second highest vote-getter received the remaining delegate. If a candidate won more than 50 percent of the vote in a given district, he or she won all three of that district's delegates.[17][18]

    Of the remaining 34 delegates, 31 served at large. At-large delegates were allocated on a proportional basis; a candidate had to win at least 20 percent of the statewide vote in order to be eligible to win any of Georgia's at-large delegates. If a candidate won more than 50 percent of the statewide vote, he or she received all of the state's at-large delegates. In addition, three national party leaders (identified on the chart below as RNC delegates) served as bound delegates to the Republican National Convention.[17][18]

    Georgia Delegates

    Georgia presidential election results ()

    • 20 Democratic wins
    • 10 Republican wins
    • 1 other win
    Year
    Winning PartyDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDRAI[19]RDDRRDRRRRRRD

    State profile

    USA Georgia location map.svg
    Demographic data for Georgia
    &#;GeorgiaU.S.
    Total population:10,,,,
    Land area (sq mi):57,3,,
    Race and ethnicity**
    White:%%
    Black/African American:%%
    Asian:%%
    Native American:%%
    Pacific Islander:0%%
    Two or more:%3%
    Hispanic/Latino:%%
    Education
    High school graduation rate:%%
    College graduation rate:%%
    Income
    Median household income:$49,$53,
    Persons below poverty level:%%
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, "American Community Survey" (5-year estimates )
    Click here for more information on the census and here for more on its impact on the redistricting process in Georgia.
    **Note: Percentages for race and ethnicity may add up to more than percent because respondents may report more than one race and the Hispanic/Latino ethnicity may be selected in conjunction with any race. Read more about race and ethnicity in the census here.
    See also: Presidential voting trends in Georgia

    Georgia voted Republican in all five presidential elections between and

    Pivot Counties ()

    Ballotpedia identified counties that voted for Donald Trump (R) in after voting for Barack Obama (D) in and Collectively, Trump won these Pivot Counties by more than , votes. Of these counties, five are located in Georgia, accounting for percent of the total pivot counties.[20]

    Pivot Counties ()

    In , Ballotpedia re-examined the Pivot Counties to view their voting patterns following that year's presidential election. Ballotpedia defined those won by Trump won as Retained Pivot Counties and those won by Joe Biden (D) as Boomerang Pivot Counties. Nationwide, there were Retained Pivot Counties and 25 Boomerang Pivot Counties. Georgia had five Retained Pivot Counties, percent of all Retained Pivot Counties.

    More Georgia coverage on Ballotpedia

    See also

    1. The raw data for this study was provided by Dave Leip of Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections.
    2. ↑This average includes states like Arizona, New Mexico, and Oklahoma, which did not participate in all 30 presidential elections between and It does not include Washington, D.C., which cast votes for president for the first time in , or Alaska and Hawaii, which cast votes for president for the first time in
    3. U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, "Electoral Votes, ," accessed June 21,
    4. ↑This number refers to the number of times that the state voted for the winning presidential candidate between and
    5. Archives.gov, "About the Electors," accessed July 28,
    6. Congressional Research Service, "The Electoral College: How it works in contemporary presidential elections," April 13,
    7. CNN, "Super Tuesday: Live updates," March 1,
    8. The New York Times, "Georgia Primary Results, ," accessed March 2,
    9. The New York Times, "Georgia Primary Results, ," accessed March 2,
    10. CNN, "Georgia Exit Polls (Democratic)," March 1,
    11. NBC News, "Ted Cruz Dominates GOP Ad Spending in Super Tuesday States," February 29,
    12. CNN, "Georgia Exit Polls (Republican)," March 1,
    13. Decatur-Avondale Estates Patch, "List of Georgia's Presidential Primary Candidates Released," December 8,
    14. Democratic National Committee, " Democratic National Convention Delegate/Alternate Allocation," updated February 19,
    15. The Green Papers, " Democratic Convention," accessed May 7,
    16. Democratic National Committee's Office of Party Affairs and Delegate Selection, "Unpledged Delegates -- By State," May 27,
    17. Republican National Committee, " Presidential Nominating Process," accessed October 6,
    18. CNN.com, "Republican National Convention roll call vote," accessed July 20,
    19. American Independent Party
    20. The raw data for this study was provided by Dave Leip of Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections.

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    Georgia Democratic presidential primary


    Georgia Democratic Presidential Primary Election Results by County, svg
    Election results by county.

    &#;&#;Hillary Clinton

    &#;&#;Bernie Sanders

    The Georgia Democratic presidential primary took place on March 1 in the U.S. state of Georgia as one of the Democratic Party's primaries ahead of the presidential election. The primary was an open one.[1]

    On the same day, dubbed "Super Tuesday," Democratic primaries were held in ten other states plus American Samoa, while the Republican Party held primaries in eleven states including their own Georgia primary.

    Clinton won every county in the state except for Echols County. She easily won Georgia in the primary by a wide margin of victory %. In , Clinton lost the Georgia primary to then-senator from Illinois Barack Obama.

    Clinton's overwhelming win was attributed mostly to the African American vote, and her endorsement from Civil Rights icon Congressman John Lewis.[2]

    Opinion polling[edit]

    See also: Statewide opinion polling for the Democratic Party presidential primaries,

    Poll source Date 1st 2nd Other
    Primary resultsMarch 1, Hillary Clinton
    %
    Bernie Sanders
    %
    Other %
    SurveyMonkey[3]

    Margin of error: ±&#;?
    Sample size:

    February 22–29, Hillary Clinton
    59%
    Bernie Sanders
    36%
    Others / Undecided 5%
    WSB-TV/Landmark[4]

    Margin of error: ±
    Sample size:

    February 28, Hillary Clinton
    70%
    Bernie Sanders
    23%
    Others / Undecided 7%
    WSB-TV/Landmark[5]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 26, Hillary Clinton
    68%
    Bernie Sanders
    22%
    Others / Undecided
    10%
    YouGov/CBS News[6]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 22–26, Hillary Clinton
    63%
    Bernie Sanders
    35%
    Others / Undecided 2%
    WABE [7]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 22–24, Hillary Clinton
    62%
    Bernie Sanders
    29%
    Others / Undecided 9%
    TEGNA/SurveyUSA[8]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 22–23, Hillary Clinton
    66%
    Bernie Sanders
    27%
    Others / Undecided 7%
    FOX 5 Atlanta[9]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 22–23, Hillary Clinton
    57%
    Bernie Sanders
    29%
    Others / Undecided 14%
    NBC News/Wall St. Jrnl[10]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 18–23, Hillary Clinton
    64%
    Bernie Sanders
    30%
    Others / Undecided 6%
    WSB-TV/Landmark[11]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 21, Hillary Clinton
    72%
    Bernie Sanders
    20%
    Others / Undecided 8%
    Public Policy Polling[12]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 14–16, Hillary Clinton
    60%
    Bernie Sanders
    26%
    Landmark/RosettaStone

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    February 4, Hillary Clinton
    %
    Bernie Sanders
    %
    Undecided %
    WXIA-TV/SurveyUSA[13]

    Margin of error: ± %
    Sample size:

    October 15–26, Hillary Clinton
    73%
    Bernie Sanders
    16%
    Martin O'Malley 4%
    Undecided 5%
    Opinion Savvy[14]

    Margin of error: ±
    Sample size:

    Published September 3, Hillary Clinton
    51%
    Bernie Sanders
    24%
    Joe Biden 15%
    Lincoln Chafee 5%
    Martin O'Malley 0%
    Jim Webb 0%
    Someone else 1%
    Undecided 5%

    Results[edit]

    See also: Results of the Democratic Party presidential primaries,

    Primary date: March 1,
    National delegates: 60

    Georgia Democratic primary, March 1,
    District Delegates available Votes Delegates
    Clinton Sanders O'Malley Steinberg Total Qualified total Clinton Sanders
    1 5 32, 12, 45, 44, 4 1
    2 5 48, 8, 57, 57, 4 1
    3 4 30, 11, 42, 42, 3 1
    4 6 73, 23, 97, 97, 5 1
    5 7 81, 32, 89 , , 5 2
    6 5 34, 22, 60 57, 56, 3 2
    7 4 27, 15, 63 43, 42, 3 1
    8 4 27, 8, 36, 36, 3 1
    9 4 14, 9, 24, 23, 2 2
    10 4 33, 15, 48, 48, 3 1
    11 4 26, 17, 89 43, 43, 2 2
    12 5 33, 9, 42, 42, 4 1
    13 6 68, 19, 88, 87, 5 1
    14 4 13, 9, 23, 22, 2 2
    Total67 , , 2, 1, , , 48 19
    PLEO13 9 4
    At Large22 16 6
    Gr. Total 73 29
    Total vote% % % % % 99,49%
    Source: Georgia Secretary of State Presidential Preference Primary Congressional District Results (Democrat)

    Results by county[edit]

    County[15]Clinton Votes Sanders Votes
    Appling%%
    Atkinson%%49
    Bacon%%58
    Baker%%48
    Baldwin%3,%
    Banks%%
    Barrow%1,%
    Bartow%2,%1,
    Ben Hill%%
    Berrien%%
    Bibb%12,%2,
    Bleckley%%98
    Brantley%%
    Brooks%%
    Bryan%%
    Bulloch%1,%1,
    Burke%1,%
    Butts%%
    Calhoun%%61
    Camden%1,%
    Candler%%
    Carroll%3,%1,
    Catoosa%1,%1,
    Charlton%%84
    Chatham%19,%7,
    Chattahoochee%%40
    Chattooga%%
    Cherokee%4,%4,
    Clarke%7,%6,
    Clay%%44
    Clayton%25,%5,
    Clinch%%38
    Cobb%39,%22,
    Coffee%1,%
    Colquitt%1,%
    Columbia%4,%2,
    Cook%%
    Coweta%4,%2,
    Crawford%%
    Crisp%%
    Dade%%
    Dawson%%
    Decatur%1,%
    DeKalb%82,%32,
    Dodge%%
    Dooly%%91
    Dougherty%8,%1,
    Douglas%9,%3,
    Early%%76
    Echols%32%36
    Effingham%1,%
    Elbert%%
    Emanuel%%
    Evans%%85
    Fannin%%
    Fayette%7,%2,
    Floyd%2,%1,
    Forsyth%3,%3,
    Franklin%%
    Fulton%82,%33,
    Gilmer%%
    Glascock%38%19
    Glynn%2,%1,
    Gordon%%
    Grady%%
    Greene%37,%18,
    Gwinnett%1,%
    Habersham%%
    Hall%3,%2,
    Hancock%1,%
    Haralson%%
    Harris%1,%
    Hart%%
    Heard%%
    Henry%15,%4,
    Houston%6,%1,
    Irwin%%74
    Jackson%1,%
    Jasper%%
    Jeff Davis%%
    Jefferson%1,%
    Jenkins%%64
    Johnson%%64
    Jones%1,%
    Lamar%%
    Lanier%%69
    Laurens%2,%
    Lee%1,%
    Liberty%2,%
    Lincoln%%93
    Long%%
    Lowndes%3,%1,
    Lumpkin%%
    Macon%%
    Madison%%
    Marion%%
    McDuffie%1,%
    McIntosh%%
    Meriwether%1,%
    Miller%%37
    Mitchell%1,%
    Monroe%1,%
    Montgomery%%72
    Morgan%%
    Murray%%
    Muscogee%12,%3,
    Newton%7,%2,
    Oconee%1,%1,
    Oglethorpe%%
    Paulding%4,%2,
    Peach%1,%
    Pickens%%
    Pierce%%
    Pike%%
    Polk%%
    Pulaski%%60
    Putnam%%
    Quitman%%15
    Rabun%%
    Randolph%%71
    Richmond%16,%3,
    Rockdale%7,%2,
    Schley%%25
    Screven%%
    Seminole%%81
    Spalding%3,%
    Stephens%%
    Stewart%%46
    Sumter%1,%
    Talbot%%
    Taliaferro%%35
    Tattnall%%
    Taylor%%62
    Telfair%%91
    Terrell%%
    Thomas%2,%
    Tift%1,%
    Toombs%%
    Towns%%
    Treutlen%%58
    Troup%3,%
    Turner%%81
    Twiggs%%
    Union%%
    Upson%1,%
    Walker%1,%
    Walton%2,%
    Ware%%
    Warren%%49
    Washington%1,%
    Wayne%%
    Webster%%18
    Wheeler%%26
    White%%
    Whitfield%1,%1,
    Wilcox%%41
    Wilkes%%
    Wilkinson%%
    Worth%%
    Total%,%,

    Analysis[edit]

    After losing in Georgia by 36 points to Barack Obama in , Hillary Clinton bounced back with a lopsided point win against rival Bernie Sanders. The victory was fueled primarily by African American voters, who comprised 51% of the electorate and backed Clinton by a margin of , compared to white voters who backed Clinton by a margin of Clinton won across all income levels and educational attainment levels in the Peach State.

    Clinton performed extremely well throughout the state of Georgia and won all of its counties but one. She ran particularly strongly in Atlanta where she won 74 percent of the vote as well as its suburbs which backed her Central Georgia, particularly the region known as the Cotton Belt which has a large African American population, also strongly favored Clinton by a margin of Clinton also performed well in North Georgia, mostly in the more rural, white and conservative parts of the state which are considered to be an extreme part of Appalachia where she defeated Sanders by a margin of [16]

    After his landslide defeat, the Sanders campaign reported that Hillary Clinton had notched wins in southern states including Georgia because Bernie Sanders did not compete with her, although this claim was disputed.[6]

    References[edit]

    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/_Georgia_Democratic_presidential_primary
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    United States presidential election in Georgia

    Election in Georgia

    Main article: United States presidential election

    Treemap of the popular vote by county.

    The United States presidential election in Georgia was held on Tuesday, November 8, , as part of the United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Georgia voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote, pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana GovernorMike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of StateHillary Clinton, and her running mate Virginia SenatorTim Kaine. Georgia has 16 electoral votes in the Electoral College.[2]

    Trump won Georgia by %, a lower margin compared to Mitt Romney's % in and even John McCain's % in Clinton received % of the vote, making this one of the few states where she outperformed Barack Obama in , when he received just % of the vote.[3] This, combined with Trump's reduced margin of victory, made Georgia one of eleven states (plus the District of Columbia) to vote more Democratic in than in [4] The Atlanta metropolitan area in particular shifted strongly Democratic compared to , with Clinton becoming the first Democrat to win Henry County since Georgia native Jimmy Carter in , and the first Democrat to win Gwinnett County and Cobb County since , when Carter won all of the state's counties.

    Background[edit]

    Further information: United States presidential election §&#;Procedure

    The incumbent President of the United States, Barack Obama, a Democrat and former U.S. Senator from Illinois, was first elected president in the election, running with former Senator Joe Biden of Delaware. Defeating the Republican nominee, Senator John McCain of Arizona, with % of the popular vote and 68% of the electoral vote,[5][6] Obama succeeded two-term Republican President George W. Bush, the former Governor of Texas. Obama and Biden were reelected in the presidential election, defeating former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney with % of the popular vote and % of electoral votes. Although Barack Obama's approval rating in the RealClearPolitics poll tracking average remained between 40 and 50% for most of his second term, it has experienced a surge in early and reached its highest point since during June of that year.[8][9] Analyst Nate Cohn has noted that a strong approval rating for Barack Obama would equate to a strong performance for the Democratic candidate, and vice versa.[10]

    Following his second term, President Obama was not eligible for another reelection. In October , Obama's running-mate and two-term Vice President Biden decided not to enter the race for the Democratic presidential nomination either.[11] With Obama and Biden's terms expiring on January 20, , the electorate was asked to elect a new president, the 45th president and 48th vice president of the United States, respectively.

    Primary elections[edit]

    Democratic primary[edit]

    Main article: Georgia Democratic primary

    Results of the Democratic primary by county.

    &#;&#;Hillary Clinton

    &#;&#;Bernie Sanders

    Four candidates appeared on the ballot:

    Republican primary[edit]

    Main article: Georgia Republican primary

    The 76 Republican delegates from Georgia were allocated in this way. There were 42 delegates allocated by congressional district; if a candidate received a majority of votes or they were the only candidate to receive at least 20% of the vote in a congressional district, they would receive the districts 3 delegates. If not, the candidate who won the plurality of the vote in a congressional district would receive 2 delegates and the second-place finisher in the district would receive 1 delegate. There were also 34 at-large delegates; if a candidate got a majority of the vote or they were the only candidate to get the mandatory threshold to receive any delegates (begins at 20%, if no one gets at least 20%, then 15%, if no one gets 15%, then 10%), they would get all of the state's at-large delegates. If not, the delegates would be allocated proportionally among the candidates receiving at least the mandatory threshold.[12]

    Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
    Bound Unbound Total
    Donald Trump,%42042
    Marco Rubio, % 16 0 16
    Ted Cruz, % 18 0 18
    Ben Carson80, % 0 0 0
    John Kasich72, % 0 0 0
    Jeb Bush(withdrawn)7, % 0 0 0
    Rand Paul(withdrawn)2, % 0 0 0
    Mike Huckabee(withdrawn)2, % 0 0 0
    Chris Christie(withdrawn)1, % 0 0 0
    Carly Fiorina(withdrawn)1, % 0 0 0
    Rick Santorum(withdrawn) % 0 0 0
    Lindsey Graham(withdrawn) % 0 0 0
    George Pataki(withdrawn) % 0 0 0
    Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
    Total: 1,, % 76 0 76
    Source: The Green Papers

    Green convention[edit]

    On June 4, the Georgia Green Party held its state convention and presidential preference vote.[13]

    Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
    Jill Stein--3
    William Kreml - - 1
    Sedinam Kinamo Christin Moyowasifza Curry - - -
    Kent Mesplay - - -
    Darryl Cherney - - -
    Total--4

    General election[edit]

    Predictions[edit]

    Source Ranking As of
    ABC News[14]Tossup November 7,
    CNN[15]Lean R November 4,
    Cook Political Report[16]Lean R November 7,
    Electoral-vote.com[17]Lean R November 7,
    Los Angeles Times[18]Lean R November 6,
    NBC[19]Tossup November 7,
    RealClearPolitics[20]Tossup November 7,
    Rothenberg Political Report[21]Lean R November 7,
    Sabato's Crystal Ball[22]Likely R November 7,

    Polling[edit]

    See also: Statewide opinion polling for the United States presidential election §&#;Georgia

    Throughout the campaign, Republican Donald Trump won the vast majority of pre-election polls. The average of the last three polls showed Donald Trump leading Hillary Clinton 50% to 46%, which was accurate compared to the results.[23]

    Statewide results[edit]

    The voting age population was 7,,, of which 5,,, were registered to vote. Turnout for the presidential election was 4,,, which is % of the voting age population and % of registered voters.

    Seventeen candidates received write-in votes, of which the large plurality (13,) went to Evan McMullin.

    Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
    RepublicanDonald TrumpMike Pence2,,%16
    DemocraticHillary ClintonTim Kaine1,, % 0
    LibertarianGary JohnsonWilliam Weld, % 0
    IndependentEvan McMullin (write-in) Nathan Johnson13, % 0
    GreenJill Stein (write-in) Ajamu Baraka7, % 0
    ConstitutionDarrell Castle (write-in) Scott Bradley1, % 0
    Others / Write-In Votes
    -
    -
    32, % 0
    Totals4,,%16
    Source: David Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections

    By county[edit]

    County Clinton% Clinton# Trump% Trump# Others% Others# Total
    Appling%1,%5,%777,
    Atkinson%%1,%352,
    Bacon%%3,%474,
    Baker%%%151,
    Baldwin%7,%7,%16,
    Banks%%6,%6,
    Barrow%6,%21,%1,28,
    Bartow%8,%29,%1,39,
    Ben Hill%2,%3,%915,
    Berrien%1,%5,%6,
    Bibb%36,%24,%1,62,
    Bleckley%1,%3,%4,
    Brantley%%5,%6,
    Brooks%2,%3,%896,
    Bryan%4,%10,%15,
    Bulloch%9,%15,%25,
    Burke%4,%4,%9,
    Butts%2,%6,%9,
    Calhoun%1,%%162,
    Camden%5,%12,%18,
    Candler%1,%2,%733,
    Carroll%12,%30,%1,43,
    Catoosa%4,%20,%26,
    Charlton%1,%2,%544,
    Chatham%62,%45,%3,,
    Chattahoochee%%%451,
    Chattooga%1,%6,%8,
    Cherokee%25,%80,%5,,
    Clarke%29,%12,%2,44,
    Clay%%%81,
    Clayton%78,%12,%1,92,
    Clinch%%1,%342,
    Cobb%,%,%14,,
    Coffee%4,%9,%13,
    Colquitt%3,%9,%13,
    Columbia%18,%43,%2,64,
    Cook%1,%4,%6,
    Coweta%16,%42,%2,61,
    Crawford%1,%3,%5,
    Crisp%2,%4,%7,
    Dade%%5,%6,
    Dawson%1,%9,%11,
    Decatur%4,%6,%10,
    DeKalb%,%51,%9,,
    Dodge%1,%5,%6,
    Dooly%1,%1,%363,
    Dougherty%23,%10,%34,
    Douglas%31,%24,%1,57,
    Early%2,%2,%654,
    Echols%%1,%131,
    Effingham%4,%17,%23,
    Elbert%2,%5,%7,
    Emanuel%2,%5,%757,
    Evans%1,%2,%683,
    Fannin%1,%9,%11,
    Fayette%23,%35,%2,60,
    Floyd%9,%24,%1,34,
    Forsyth%23,%69,%4,97,
    Franklin%1,%7,%8,
    Fulton%,%,%15,,
    Gilmer%1,%10,%12,
    Glascock%%1,%171,
    Glynn%11,%21,%34,
    Gordon%3,%15,%18,
    Grady%3,%6,%9,
    Greene%3,%5,%8,
    Gwinnett%,%,%12,,
    Habersham%2,%13,%16,
    Hall%16,%51,%2,70,
    Hancock%2,%%363,
    Haralson%1,%9,%11,
    Harris%4,%11,%16,
    Hart%2,%7,%10,
    Heard%%3,%934,
    Henry%50,%45,%2,98,
    Houston%22,%35,%1,59,
    Irwin%%2,%583,
    Jackson%4,%21,%27,
    Jasper%1,%4,%6,
    Jeff Davis%%4,%865,
    Jefferson%3,%3,%706,
    Jenkins%1,%1,%343,
    Johnson%1,%2,%273,
    Jones%3,%8,%12,
    Lamar%2,%5,%7,
    Lanier%%1,%732,
    Laurens%6,%12,%19,
    Lee%3,%10,%14,
    Liberty%9,%6,%16,
    Lincoln%1,%2,%704,
    Long%1,%2,%4,
    Lowndes%15,%21,%37,
    Lumpkin%2,%9,%12,
    Macon%2,%1,%424,
    Madison%2,%9,%11,
    Marion%1,%1,%493,
    McDuffie%3,%5,%9,
    McIntosh%2,%3,%5,
    Meriwether%3,%5,%9,
    Miller%%1,%302,
    Mitchell%3,%4,%937,
    Monroe%3,%8,%12,
    Montgomery%%2,%453,
    Morgan%2,%6,%9,
    Murray%1,%10,%12,
    Muscogee%39,%26,%1,68,
    Newton%21,%20,%43,
    Oconee%5,%13,%19,
    Oglethorpe%1,%4,%6,
    Paulding%18,%44,%1,64,
    Peach%5,%5,%10,
    Pickens%1,%11,%13,
    Pierce%%6,%937,
    Pike%1,%7,%8,
    Polk%2,%11,%14,
    Pulaski%1,%2,%583,
    Putnam%2,%6,%9,
    Quitman%%%81,
    Rabun%1,%6,%7,
    Randolph%1,%1,%282,
    Richmond%48,%24,%1,75,
    Rockdale%23,%13,%37,
    Schley%%1,%361,
    Screven%2,%3,%945,
    Seminole%1,%2,%483,
    Spalding%9,%15,%25,
    Stephens%1,%7,%9,
    Stewart%1,%%282,
    Sumter%5,%5,%10,
    Talbot%2,%1,%463,
    Taliaferro%%%3
    Tattnall%1,%5,%6,
    Taylor%1,%2,%453,
    Telfair%1,%2,%323,
    Terrell%2,%1,%404,
    Thomas%7,%11,%18,
    Tift%4,%9,%14,
    Toombs%2,%6,%9,
    Towns%1,%5,%6,
    Treutlen%%1,%322,
    Troup%9,%15,%26,
    Turner%1,%2,%533,
    Twiggs%1,%2,%504,
    Union%1,%9,%12,
    Upson%3,%7,%10,
    Walker%4,%18,%23,
    Walton%8,%31,%1,40,
    Ware%3,%8,%12,
    Warren%1,%%282,
    Washington%4,%4,%988,
    Wayne%2,%8,%10,
    Webster%%%131,
    Wheeler%%1,%352,
    White%1,%9,%11,
    Whitfield%7,%21,%30,
    Wilcox%%2,%252,
    Wilkes%1,%2,%574,
    Wilkinson%1,%2,%514,
    Worth%2,%6,%8,

    Counties that flipped from Democratic to Republican[edit]

    Counties that flipped from Republican to Democratic[edit]

    By congressional district[edit]

    Trump won 10 of 14 congressional districts.[24]

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^("Official Presidential General Election Results"(PDF). Federal Election Commission. December Retrieved December 19, ) ("Voting and Registration in the Election of November ". United States Census Bureau. May Retrieved May 3, )
    2. ^"Distribution of Electoral Votes". National Archives and Records Administration. 19 September Retrieved November 25,
    3. ^"Georgia Election Results – The New York Times". Retrieved November 10,
    4. ^" Presidential General Election Data - National". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Elections. Retrieved May 11,
    5. ^"United States House of Representatives floor summary for Jan 8, ". Clerk.house.gov. Archived from the original on Retrieved January 30,
    6. ^"Federal elections "(PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved May 11,
    7. ^"Election Other – President Obama Job Approval". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved December 24,
    8. ^Byrnes, Jesse (). "Poll: Obama approval rating highest since ". TheHill. Retrieved
    9. ^Cohn, Nate (). "What a Rise in Obama's Approval Rating Means for ". The New York Times. ISSN&#; Retrieved
    10. ^"Joe Biden Decides Not to Enter Presidential Race". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 21,
    11. ^"Georgia Republican Delegation ". www.thegreenpapers.com. Retrieved
    12. ^"An Open Letter to Greens in Georgia: Ballot Access can be had in ". Georgia Green Party. April 16, Retrieved April 26, [permanent dead link]
    13. ^"The Final The Latest Polls in the Swing States That Will Decide the Election". ABC News. November 7, Retrieved February 9,
    14. ^Chalian, David
    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/_United_States_presidential_election_in_Georgia

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