Toyota pickup transmission removal

Toyota pickup transmission removal DEFAULT

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Sours: https://board.marlincrawler.com/index.php?topic=
Hi again Sergeant. I am sorry to hear that but I am not surprised that you are still at it. Can't keep a good Army man down.

There are no tricks for these top bolts. It is pretty common that the only real way to get them is to use a 3 foot extension and 1/2 inch impact wrench with a swivel socket on the end of it.

Take a look at the attachments. This is the process from the manual but the last couple pages show what I am talking about.

If you look where I show the red lines. This is the extension and basically you can use the swivel sockets to get a better angle at it and remove the bolts. This bets the heck out of trying to reach up there with a ratchet.

Just make sure you have a floor jack under the trans with a strap around the top of it so it doesn't slip.

Please run through this material and let me know what questions you have and we can go from there. Thanks

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REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
Removal
Disconnect battery cable. Remove air cleaner. Drain cooling system. Remove upper radiator hose. Remove shift lever boot, shifter assembly and starter.
Raise and support vehicle. Remove protective cover from under engine (if equipped). Remove clutch slave cylinder with hydraulic line connected. Disconnect front exhaust pipe from manifold and converter. Remove exhaust pipe from vehicle.
Disconnect speedometer cable and electrical leads from transmission. Remove drive shaft(s). Insert plug into extension housing to prevent oil spillage.
Support engine. Support transmission with transmission jack. Remove rear support crossmember. Remove transmission-to-engine bolts. Pull transmission to rear. Lower and remove transmission from vehicle.
Mark pressure plate and flywheel for reassembly reference. Loosen pressure plate attaching bolts alternately and evenly until pressure plate is released. Remove clutch disc and pressure plate.
Installation
Use aligning tool to center clutch disc on flywheel. Tighten pressure plate bolts alternately and evenly in a diagonal pattern to 14 ft. Lbs. (18 N.M).
Use feeler gauge and Diaphragm Aligner () to measure gap between spring tips and tool. If gap is larger then" ( mm), use Diaphragm Aligner () to bend springs into alignment.
Apply molybdenum disulphide grease to release fork and hub, hub and lever, hub and oil seal and hub and bushing. Apply grease to inside of bearing and inside clutch disc splines. Reverse removal procedure to complete installation.

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Street Smart® Technical and DIY Guides

Organizing Nuts and Bolts

Keeping nuts, bolts, washers, clamps, etc. organized is important for two reasons&#; 1) it will save you time and frustration when re-installing the transmission and 2) it will insure all nuts and bolts are replaced in their original locations.

Organize nuts and bolts: For organizing nuts and bolts, we recommend using labeled plastic containers or baggies, whichever you have available. It&#;s best to get all the containers or baggies labeled before starting the job.

For removing the transmission from a rear wheel drive vehicle, you will need the following labeled containers/baggies.

> Driveshaft Bolts/U-Joint Bolts
> Shifter Linkage Nuts/Bolts/Clips
> Cross Member Nuts/Bolts
> Transmission Mount Nuts/Bolts
> Transmission Oil Fill/Dipstick Tube Bracket Bolt or Nut
> Transmission Oil Cooler Line Fitting Washers
> Starter Bolts
> Exhaust and Exhaust Heat Shield Bolts/Nuts
> Bell Housing Bolts
> Flywheel Cover Plate Bolts
> Torque Converter to Flywheel Bolts (or Nuts)
> Miscellaneous

Note: Depending on your vehicle, additional labeled containers may be needed.

Let&#;s Get Started

Park your vehicle on a flat concrete surface, put the shifter in Park, set the emergency brake, pull the hood latch and then open the hood.

1) Remove the negative battery cable. Move the cable end away from the battery post.

Safety Tip: To eliminate any chance of battery arching, after removing the battery cable, wrap a rag around the cable end and place a wrap over the battery terminal.

Note About Radio Code: On many newer vehicles, whenever the battery is disconnected a radio code is needed to get the stereo working again. Check your Vehicle Owner&#;s Manual for the code or contact the service department of any auto dealership that sells your make vehicle for assistance. Have your vehicle identification number (VIN) readily available before making the call.

2-A) On some vehicles, it may be necessary to remove the black plastic air intake components to give your sufficient space to work.

2-B) Now, locate the transmission fluid dipstick &#; pull it out and set it aside. The dipstick tube (also called transmission fill tube) is normally secured to the transmission or engine with a single nut or bolt. If you can see this nut/bolt and it is easily accessible, go ahead and remove it along with dipstick tube now. If not, you can remove it later from underneath.

Still working under the hood, locate and disconnect any transmission electrical connectors you see.

3-A) Remove any brackets, cables or hoses that connect the transmission to the engine.

3-B) Now, locate the starter motor. Remove any starter bolts that are accessible. Any starter bolts that are not removed now will be removed later from underneath. Complete removal of the starter is normally not necessary. Once the bolts are removed, just pull the starter out of the bell housing and push aside. Use a wire or strong bungee cord to hold the starter&#;s weight &#; do not hang from the starter wiring.

3-C) Look closely at the top rear of the engine (back by the firewall) where the transmission bell housing bolts to the engine. Remove any of the top bell housing to engine bolts that are accessible &#; otherwise the bolts will be removed later from underneath.

Note:You should be placing nuts and bolts in their labeled containers as you remove them.

Note:When removing brackets, mark their locations or make a simple drawing showing their locations. When disconnecting hoses and cables, make a drawing showing how each one is routed. Taking photos before disconnecting brackets, hoses and cables should serve the same purpose, which is to make the installation of these components easier and quicker.

4) CHOCK REAR WHEEL &#; RAISE FRONT OF VEHICLE
Place a wheel chock or wooden block behind one of the rear wheels. Using a floor jack, lift the front of the vehicle and secure with jack stands. Although it is not absolutely necessary, lifting the rear of the vehicle and supporting with jack stands makes the job a little easier.

Note: When jacking up the vehicle, be sure to give yourself ample room to work underneath. Also, keep in mind that once the transmission is removed and lowered to the floor, the vehicle must be high enough off the floor to allow the transmission to be slid out from underneath the vehicle.

5) DRAIN TRANSMISSION FLUID: Remove all the pan bolts except for a few bolts at one end of the pan &#; only loosen these. This will allow the pan to drop down on one end so the fluid can drain into your catch pan. See image>>>

5-A) After draining the fluid, reposition the pan back to its original position and re-install the pan bolts, but only hand tighten.

6) Remove driveshaft. Remove the 4 U-joint bolts that hold the driveshaft to the rear differential. Then, using a small pry bar or screwdriver, pry the driveshaft forward to release it from the differential. Now, pull the driveshaft out of the transmission and set aside. Place the U-joint bolts and hardware in an appropriately marked container.

Tip: When pulling the driveshaft out of the transmission, be careful not to allow it to fall hard to the floor. Also, wrap tape around the joint caps to keep them from falling off and the pins from falling out of the caps.

7) DISCONNECT ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS AND HOSES: Disconnect electrical connectors, hoses and cables that are attached to the transmission.

Tip: Use colored markers to mark connectors and hoses for easy and correct installation. Mark the connector and its respective plugin with the same color. Do the same with vacuum hoses and any other parts that might be confusing during installation.

8)DETACH TRANSMISSION OIL COOLER LINES

Detach the two transmission oil cooler lines at the transmission.line wrench

Tip: It is best to use a line wrench when loosening and tightening the oil cooler lines. Also, when pulling the lines out, be careful not to lose the thin metal washers. The fittings will leak if these washers are not replaced.

9) REMOVE STARTER BOLTS
If you have not already removed the started bolts, do it now. Again, complete removal of the starter is normally unnecessary. Just pull it out and away from the bell housing so that it does not interfere with the removal of the transmission. Secure the starter with a piece of wire or bungee strap. Do not allow starter to hang by the starter wiring.

10) REMOVE TORQUE CONVERTER TO FLYWHEEL BOLTS
To gain access the torque converter bolts, remove the inspection plate/cover located at the bottom front of the bell housing. The cover is normally made of thin metal or aluminum and is held in place by a several 10mm or 12mm bolts. Once cover is removed, using a flashlight or droplight, look inside the bell housing to locate the bolts/nuts holding the torque converter to the flywheel/flex-plate. You can only remove one bolt/nut at a time before having to rotate the engine to gain access to the next bolt/nut.

You can rotate the engine in one of two ways; Use a breaker bar and large socket to rotate the center harmonic balancer bolt on the front of the engine or by leveraging a small pry bar or large screwdriver between the teeth of the flywheel and the bell housing in such a way that allows you to turn the flywheel in either direction. To make this task easier, remove some or all of the spark plugs from the engine.

Note:If you are unable to access the torque converter bolts after removing the inspection plate cover then your vehicle may be one that requires the converter nuts/bolts to be accessed and removed through the starter opening in the bell housing. These are usually more difficult to remove because there is very little space.

Caution: Be absolutely certain you remove all the torque converter bolts/nuts or else the converter will hang to the flywheel/flex-plate as you are trying to pull the transmission back away from the engine to lower it to the floor. This situation will create a real mess and can be potentially dangerous.

11) REMOVE TRANSMISSION MOUNT BOLTS/NUTS
Position your hydraulic jack (or transmission jack if you have one) under the transmission pan and raise slightly. With the weight of the transmission resting on the jack, remove the transmission mount bolts. Removing the transmission mount bolts (or nuts) allows the transmission to be separated from the cross member.

12) REMOVE CROSS MEMBER
Remove the cross member to frame mounting bolts and then remove the cross member.

Tip: If cross member bolts are difficult to remove, you need to raise the transmission jack to take more of the weight off the cross member.

13) REMOVE EXHAUST CROSSOVER PIPE
Depending on the vehicle, it may be necessary to remove certain parts of the exhaust system. Unless the vehicle has duel exhaust all the way back, which most do not, there is a crossover pipe that connects the left side exhaust to the right side. At a minimum, the crossover pipe must be removed.

Once the crossover pipe is removed, look closely at the exhaust pipe, (the section of the exhaust system that includes the catalytic converter and muffler) to determine if it also needs to be removed.

Tip: Remove any section of the exhaust system that you feel could interfere with your ability to separate the transmission from the engine and lower it to the floor. Having to remove parts of the exhaust after the transmission is separated from the engine is much more difficult.

14) REMOVE TRANSMISSION BELL HOUSING BOLTS
Remove all the bell housing bolts except one. The bolt you leave in should be one of bottom bolts that is easy to get too.

To remove the top bell housing bolts, if you have not already done so, lower the transmission jack so that the rear of the transmission drops down and away from the undercarriage of the vehicle. This will increase the work space on the top side of the transmission enabling you to use a ratchet and long extension to remove the upper bell housing bolts.

Note:When lowering the transmission in order to give you the added work space needed to remove the top bell housing bolts, the weight of the transmission still needs to be supported by the jack. If the jack is lowered completely, the engine will tilt severely on its mounts, possible weakening or breaking the mounts.

Caution:Some hydraulic floor jacks are very sensitive when lowering and can drop suddenly. For added safety, place a jack stand directly under the rear of the transmission to serve as a hard stop.

15) DETACH TRANSMISSION FROM ENGINE AND LOWER TO THE FLOOR:
Before removing the last bell housing bolt, check to make sure all transmission electrical connections have been disconnected. Also check to make sure nothing else will interfere with separating the transmission from the engine and lowering it to the floor.

A) Remove the last remaining bell housing bolt.

B) With the help of an assistant, hold the transmission steady on the jack and move the jack back and away from the engine just slightly so that the transmission separates from the engine &#; then slowly lower the jack. When the jack is fully lowered, carefully slide the transmission off the jack to the floor. Now, slide the transmission out from underneath the vehicle.

WARNING: Once the transmission is separated from the engine, there is nothing holding the torque converter to the transmission. Therefore, it is crucial that the transmission remain level (or slightly titled down in the rear) while being lowered to the floor. If the front of the transmission is allowed to tilt downward, the converter may slide out of the transmission and fall hard to the floor. The converter is very heavy and filled with fluid – if it falls, it could injure you or your assistant. The converter could also be damaged and it will surely create a huge mess.

16) SEPARATE TORQUE CONVERTER FROM TRANSMISSION
Once the transmission is moved out from underneath the vehicle, pull the torque converter out of the transmission and drain the fluid into a catch pan.

Note: The fluid will need to be drained from the converter regardless of whether you plan to reuse it or replace it. If you plan to replace the torque converter with a new or rebuilt converter, the old converter must be drained of the fluid in order to use it as a core when purchasing the new or rebuilt converter.

Sours: https://streetsmarttransmission.com/diy-remove-automatic-transmission-and-install-rwd/

Pickup removal toyota transmission


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Clutch Replacement Writeup


First off, I want to say (and I know its been said plenty of times before), this job is pretty time consuming, and can be a pain in the butt! The mechanics of the job itself are not difficult, but trying to maneuver the transmission out of and back into the vehicle proved to be pretty difficult. I wanted to do a write up because the only write ups I could find were kind of old and had broken links. Hopefully this helps some folks out!

The first time I did this job, I used a motorcycle jack, thinking it would be sufficient. From a stability standpoint it was a good call, however, it couldn&#;t be lifted high enough to actually contact the transmission, so I had to build a little jig out of 4x4&#;s I had laying around. If you are planning to tackle this job, I would highly highly recommend buying a transmission jack. It made this job much much more manageable the 2nd time around. Harbor freight sells them for bucks, or if you live in the Hampton roads area of Virginia you could likely borrow mine, or I might be willing to lend a hand.

My ghetto jack assembly I used the first go around.
Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

I used the FSM as a guide on removal (pg of the pdf version). It was pretty nice to have laying around, there are plenty of copies of it out there on the web to look at if you need to. The only thing I have to note, is you do not need to drain your transmission fluid. I did not drain my motor oil and I did the rear main seal while I was in there with no issues as well.

I have now pulled the transmission and clutch 3 times in the last 4 months (rear main seal issues), and this is what I&#;ve come up with to work best for me.

I started under the rig with the drive shafts and cross member first. Make sure you match-mark the drive shafts before removal, otherwise you may be unbalanced when you reinstall and could cause some vibrations (or so im told). The bolts/nuts for the drive shafts are 14mm. Some of the bolts needed to be removed with an open end wrench, others you can get with a socket as long as you have a few extensions on the ratchet. The second time I did this I had purchased those nice new ratcheting open end wrenches, they were great.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

Next thing you will want to remove is the aft cross member (just forward of the gas tank). The first time I did the job I didn&#;t realize that it had to come out until I had the transmission disconnected and was coming down. It is held in place with a 14mm bolt. You will need an open end wrench on this guy to hold the other side of the bolt/nut closest to the gas tank.

I went ahead and loosened all the bolts on the cross member supporting the transmission, and removed the ones that actually bolt to the transmission. I didn&#;t want to have a hard time disconnecting the cross member once the transmission was unbolted from the motor, so I broke everything loose in preparation. The first time I did this I unbolted the cross member from the bracket that connects to the transmission, this was pointless, absolutely no need to. All the bolts for this are also a 14mm.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

On the driver&#;s side of the transmission you will need to disconnect the slave cylinder as well as the two attachments for the hydraulic line. These are 12mm bolts. Before doing this I would recommend putting your transmission in neutral if it isn&#;t already. I say this because I have the tendency when I get in my rig to push the clutch and check if it&#;s in neutral, which will end up pushing the piston all the way out of the slave cylinder (ask me how I know!).

Up is to the left.
Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

The passenger&#;s side has a bracket connected to the exhaust and the starter which must be removed. The starter just has two bolts, they are 14mm bolts. We left the starter to rest on the suspension components until the transmission was moved out. The bracket that needs to be removed is attached to the exhaust, undo that bolt and pull the bracket out. This bracket was broken on my rig. We ended up (before install) grinding the attachment ear off of the exhaust to provide a little more installation space. I&#;m not certain how we got the transmission out with it there, because it sure didn&#;t want to go back in even without it.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

The front of the bell housing has a &#;rear end plate&#; which, from what I can see, just serves to keep extra road grime and whatnot from getting into the housing. It is attached using 4 small 12mm bolts. If you don&#;t have ratcheting open end wrenches then I feel sorry for you, this was miserable without them.

Once all that is done you can start the joy of unbolting the transmission. All 6 bolts are 17mm. To get the very top one I used a universal, two longer extensions and one short extension. I held the socket on the bolt from the passengers side and ran the extensions up the drivers side. Once I had the socket on and a little pressure I could take my right hand off the socket and put some torque on the ratchet. We removed this bolt all the way, along with the other two short bolts. We then loosened and removed the remaining bolts (three long ones, all low hanging fruit in comparison).

Note, this photo is looking from the rear to the front.
Clutch Replacement Writeup-transmission-bolts-png

Once they were loose I went ahead and raised the transmission jack up to the transmission and put weight on it (taking weight off the cross member). And removed the cross member the rest of the way.

This step can really be done at any time, no reason it needs to be done after everything else. But you gotta removed the shifters at some point. I replaced the seats with new Marlin Crawler HD seats. Once you remove the shifter boots and the rubber/metal dust boot, you will see where the shifters actually attach to the tranny. Pull the rubber boots up out of the way. The transmission shifter requires you to push down and rotate counter clockwise to remove. Once you have done that the shifter should pull right out. I recommend leaving the transmission in neutral.

Removal of the transfer case shifter is much the same as removal of the transmission shifter, however, it is held in place with a snap ring in lieu of a push and turn type mechanism. Remove the snap ring and pull up. My transfer case seat was all sorts of destroyed. Additionally, I yelled more trying to get this dumb snap ring back in than any other part of the job, lol.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg
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Once they are out, you may be tempted to start reaching around down there trying to disconnect electrical connectors, but you’d be better off waiting until the transmission is lowered just a hair. There are two that can be gotten easily from below, your back up light sensor, and one of your o2 sensors. The other three are better to hold off on.

I expected the transmission to come back easily (that was a foolish thought). It will take some shaking and moving around. We ended up using a small pry bar to work the transmission back. Once loose it was just a matter of lowering the transmission down and out, which took some finesse to do. Move it back a little, lower it down a little, move it back a little, lower it down a little. Once you get it back and down just a little bit, you can crawl back up top and reach down and get those electrical connectors. It is much much easier when the transmission has been lowered a little. There should only be 3 that you need to get from the topside.

There is no need to actually pull the transmission out from under the vehicle. I did the first time, and found it to be unnecessary. It will slide back far enough under the vehicle to be out of the way (assume you had your rig on ramps like I did).

Now you get your first good view of the clutch. We used an impact wrench to remove the components. The pressure plate used six (6) 14mm bolts. The flywheel was held on using eight (8) 17mm bolts. Once these components are off you will see the pilot bearing and rear main seal. We used a pilot bearing removal tool (rented) to remove the bearing. Good thing I replaced it because it was completely seized up. Reinstallation was done with an appropriately sized socket.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg
Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

The rear main seal came out using a hooked pick. Started on the inside of the seal (closest to the crank), pushed it through, then rotated it behind the seal and pulled out. I had seen some information on these a few other times which mentioned that Toyota changed their part and the new one is slightly smaller than the old in thickness (space it will occupy from the motor towards the rear of the vehicle). I checked and sure enough it was. This was the joy in why I’ve done the job three times. I had blocked crankcase ventilation which was putting too much pressure on the seal and pushing it out. I guess having to work on the RMS a few times is a better way of discovering the issue than some sort of major failure. Anyways, for reinstallation I pushed the seal all the way until flush with the seating surface of the engine (i.e. the retainer plate), which meant the crank stood slightly proud. I used a piece of PVC and a hammer. There is no need to remove the retainer plate, you will just find yourself fooling around with FIPG to put it back on for no reason.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

Once everything was off it was easy enough to reinstall. I used this tool to hold the engine from rotating while we torqued the new components on.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

I originally bought the tool to be used when I did my timing belt, glad I still had it. Wherever it was that I got it from amazon, it did not fit the motor right and I had to grind it down some. Anyways, reinstallation, the flywheel was 63 ft-lbs while the pressure plate was 14 ft-lbs or in-lbs. Make sure to use an alignment tool during these steps to make sure the actual clutch is lined up property. We used some brake cleaner to remove any grease/oils on the flywheel from our fingers prior to reinstallation. The pressure plate has a specific torque sequence (according to the FSM).

Clutch Replacement Writeup-pressure-plate-torque-png

The throw-out bearing is pretty easy. Just a small metal clip you remove and reinstall the new one in the same manner the old was removed. Sorry I didn’t get a good picture of this.

Clutch Replacement Writeup-img_jpg

I would recommend before reinstalling the transmission to make sure that the transmission is as flat (side to side) on the jack as it can be. There are guide pins on the back of the motor that must be lined up for it to seat. What I ended up doing once the transmission was all the way up, just not seated in the guide pins, was to crawl back by the rear diff, put my feet on either side, and push/rock side to side. This seemed to be the most efficient method of getting it to seat. Once it starts onto the guide pins you can use the bolts to pull it the rest of the way in.

Once in place, bolt everything up. Make sure you place your long and short bolts in the right place. In general, the short ones are hard to get, the long ones are easy. Two of the short ones go way up top (top center and top passengers side). Two long ones are the low hanging fruit on the right side. Drivers side, short one goes up high, long one down low. These are supposed to be torqued to 53 ft-lbs.

Once I had one on the right and one on the left snug, I put a regular jack under the backside of the transmission, removed my trans jack, and reinstalled the cross member. The transmission jack is a bit bulky and can make it hard to work.

Put the starter, rear end plate, and hydraulics back on. Part of the slave cylinders securing bracket is through one of the transmission bolts, just FYI incase you didn’t notice during removal. Reconnect your drive shafts and shifters. Fill with fluid (if you drained). And give her a test run. Pray it works out, because if it doesn’t you will cry.

If you have any questions let me know!

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Good writeup, thanks!

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Just did this the other day. New clutch, flywheel, the works. Using a lift at a local DIY shop. Having slight vibrations when releasing the clutch pedal without using the gas in first gear and reverse. Hopefully it just needs to break in. I don't have the heart to pull it all back out right now


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Quote:

Originally Posted by maxbrown11cView Post

Just did this the other day. New clutch, flywheel, the works. Using a lift at a local DIY shop. Having slight vibrations when releasing the clutch pedal without using the gas in first gear and reverse. Hopefully it just needs to break in. I don't have the heart to pull it all back out right now

My second gen did that and my tacoma. I've heard it is characteristic of oil on the clutch (clutch chatter). I know the feeling, having to pull the transmission more than once was miserable.
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Good job. The DIY's I used a few years ago are mostly dead or at least have lost their pictures. These are still alive:

5VZ Clutch Job - TTORA Forum

Toyota 4Runner Clutch Replacement on 4x4Wire.com

Whatever you do, try and get access to an FSM from or earlier. Most of the ones on-line are from and only cover slushboxes.


I have a few comments:

- the exhaust bracket is different on us '99 and '00 Cali-emissions types and there is no need to do anything

-remember to put the tranny jack straps UNDER the wires, or you will be filling up your swear jar

- you can get most of the bolts on the transmission cover plate with a few really long extensions and a 1/4" ratchet; I found this easier/faster than the GearWrench except for one or two where you could not do this.

- if you can't get those top bolts, put the weight on the tranny jack, remove the cross-member, and let the trans sag down a little bit by lowering the jack. Gives a lot more access with just a little sag. For those pesky connectors, too. I wished I had done it this way from the beginning. I used about 4 feet of half-inch extensions and came all the way forward from behind the TC.

- Do the same thing on the install. Put the bell/trans/TC back on with everything flat, put in two easy lower bolts, then let it sag and do the rest, AND the dang wires.

- you don't mention lube. You want a very thin coat of moly grease on the shaft splines (if any gets on the clutch disk it is toast), and the ball for the fork needs a lot. Also where the fork ends contact. My clutch was so smooth after I had it all together it put a big smile on my face when I test drove.

-if you prefer, Harbor Freight has a decent blind bearing puller for a little over $30 that worked great. I tried the grease trick and just got myself dirty.

-if you don't have a tool, you can use a big flathead screwdriver to engage the teeth on the flywheel when you torque up those bolts (described better in one of my links.)

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Thanks @TheDurk . Tips and tricks like that can really make a difference in how long this job takes.

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Rear End Plate


I'm in the process of doing this job now just curious if the rear end plate really has to come off? I'm only asking because two of the 4 nuts I have no idea how I can get to them. These are the ones located on the drivers side. I can barley see them!

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I'm in the process of doing this job now just curious if the rear end plate really has to come off? I'm only asking because two of the 4 nuts I have no idea how I can get to them. These are the ones located on the drivers side. I can barley see them!

I honestly don’t remember, I know I did each time I did it, which means I must have felt like I needed to. If you find out you don’t need to though, that would be good information to add to the thread!
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I honestly don’t remember, I know I did each time I did it, which means I must have felt like I needed to. If you find out you don’t need to though, that would be good information to add to the thread!

No worries, thanks.

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I honestly don&#;t remember, I know I did each time I did it, which means I must have felt like I needed to. If you find out you don&#;t need to though, that would be good information to add to the thread!

It absolutely has to come off. The flyweel is aft of the plate and will hang up if it is still there. I tried.

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It absolutely has to come off. The flyweel is aft of the plate and will hang up if it is still there. I tried.

Thanks for confirming TheDurk. I figured as much but a guy can hope. Now i need to get me an extra long 12mm wrench. Those bolts on the passenger side are ridiculous!

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Thanks for confirming TheDurk. I figured as much but a guy can hope. Now i need to get me an extra long 12mm wrench. Those bolts on the passenger side are ridiculous!

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Yeah, I think those are the ones I did not bother to put back in.

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Can you give an approximate amount of time this took, on your first try? Thanks! Maybe others too who took this on. Just trying to get an idea of how much time to put aside. Thanks!

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Can you give an approximate amount of time this took, on your first try? Thanks! Maybe others too who took this on. Just trying to get an idea of how much time to put aside. Thanks!

Hello,

It was a big job for me given that I did it solo and without a hoist! Just a couple of 3 ton jacks and a lot of patience. In retrospect I would not do this job again without a hoist and a proper tranny jack. The most time consuming part of the job for me was lining up the tranny to fit back in. The whole job must have taken me 20 hours. Hope that helps.

Dave

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