Buy 1660 super

Buy 1660 super DEFAULT

Karadjgne said:

Then scalpers are hitting Amazon and newegg etc, pre-ordering huge quantities through multiple accounts (kids, grandma, wife, buddy etc), so there's relatively little stock actually dedicated to retail sales. You've got weeks of wait and seconds to buy to get their price. But it's not hard to find a $399 3060ti for $599 from AcmeScalper.com, shipped from Japan at additional shipping fee.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/164615239878

Click to expand...

UGH. It's still despicable to see others buying those jacked up gpus - at the same time, I can't blame the folks selling them for doing it.
WTCrap, 850USD for a 3060Ti? Plus they sold 4 of them?
I signed up for EVGA's 3080 queue, and the 2 cards(XC3 Ultra Hybrid & FTW3 Ultra Hybrid) I signed up for are cheaper than that.

3080, cheaper than a scalped 3060Ti, but I just have to wait a little. Geezus, some people...:pfff:

@AlterEg00
You may just have to wait some more, sadly...

 

Sours: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/impossible-to-buy-a-decent-affordable-gpu-atm-1660-super-or-2060.3678690/

Most people who are in the market for a new graphics card have one primary question in mind: Which card will give me the most bang for my buck? Obviously, the answer will vary depending on your budget. Beyond that, there are a number of factors to  consider: Raw performance is important, but so are things like noise, the driver experience, and supplemental software. And do you want to pay a premium to get in on the bleeding edge of real-time ray tracing?

Let us make it easy for you. We’ve tested nearly every major GPU that’s hit the streets over the past couple of years, from $100 budget cards to $1,200 luxury models. Our knowledge has been distilled into this article—a buying guide with recommendations on which graphics card to buy, no matter what sort of experience you’re looking for.

Note: There are customized versions of every graphics card from a host of vendors. For example, you can buy different GeForce GTX 3080 models from EVGA, Asus, MSI, and Zotac, among others.

We’ve linked to our complete review for each recommendation, but the buying links lead to models that hew closely to each graphics card’s MSRP. Spending extra can get you hefty out-of-the-box overclocks, beefier cooling systems, and more. Check out our “What to look for in a custom card” section below for tips on how to choose a customized card that’s right for you.

Graphics card news

  • It’s all but impossible to find graphics cards right now, especially at sane prices. Our explainer of the perfect GPU storm reveals why. The GeForce RTX 30-series and Radeon RX 6000-series sold out instantly and remain scarce in the face of overwhelming demand, with scalpers and bots snatching them up just as greedily as enthusiasts. Demand is so high that even older-generation graphics cards are selling for more than they cost new, years ago, in most cases. If you’re stuck without a graphics card, consider trying Nvidia’s free GeForce Now cloud streaming or a next-gen gaming console instead to tide you over. 

  • More affordable graphics cards may start to fill out this generation soon. Nvidia recently launched the GeForce RTX 3050 and 3050 Ti for mainstream laptops—the first time in recent memory a new GeForce GPU debuted in laptops rather than desktops. Rumors of a non-XT Radeon RX 6600 GPU have also started to circulate. Don’t be surprised if these wind up launching in proper graphics card form in the coming weeks or months.

  • More relief will be on the way soon (though not too soon) in the form of a third contender. Intel recently took the wraps off its hotly anticipated “Arc Alchemist” GPUs, built on the company’s Xe architecture. These gamer-focused graphics cards—Intel’s first stab at discrete consumer GPUs—sometime in the first quarter of 2022, complete with hardware-based ray tracing support and XeSS, an AI-based image upsampling tool built to rival Nvidia’s DLSS tech.
  • Want to dive even deeper into your hardware? We’ve recently published guides explaining how to benchmark your graphics card and how to turn on AMD’s Smart Access Memory for faster gaming performance, as well as an explainer on Nvidia’s “Lite Hash Rate” anti-mining technology.

Best budget graphics card

amd ryzen

Editor’s note: Demand is through the roof for graphics cards right now. Newer models sell out instantly and often cost hundreds of dollars more than MSRP. Even older-generation graphics cards are selling for more than what they cost new, years ago. We can’t recommend people buy graphics cards at those markups, but if you’re lucky enough to find stock at MSRP, this guide should help. Note that prices below discuss MSRP, as it’s impossible to stay current with today’s volatile pricing.

The next-gen Nvidia GeForce RTX 30-series and AMD Radeon RX 6000-series have yet to trickle down to budget markets, an understandable twist given how much graphics cards currently sell for. And with even ancient used graphics cards selling for hundreds of dollars, it’s virtually impossible to snag a graphics card on a budget right now. Consider trying Nvidia’s free GeForce Now cloud streaming or a next-gen gaming console instead to tide you over. 

If you need a local PC gaming solution those obviously won’t cut it though. Your best bet is to pick up one of AMD’s game-ready Ryzen 5000G APUs, which remain in stock in both DIY form and inside numerous prebuilt systems. “You can build a Ryzen 5 5700G machine today and get outstanding CPU performance along with OK gaming performance,” we said in our review. Yes, you’ll need to dial down some graphics options for the best performance, but you’ll be able to play esports games and even triple-A titles at a decent clip at 720p or 1080p resolution. At $259 for the Ryzen 5 5600GRemove non-product link and $369 for the Ryzen 7 5700GRemove non-product link, they aren’t exactly cheap, especially since you’ll also need a motherboard to plop them into, but remember that you’re getting both a CPU and a doable GPU stand-in for the price. And hey, they’re actually in stock.

Best 1080p graphics card

Editor’s note: Demand is through the roof for graphics cards right now. Newer models sell out instantly and often cost hundreds of dollars more than MSRP. Even older-generation graphics cards are selling for more than what they cost new, years ago. We can’t recommend people buy graphics cards at those markups, but if you’re lucky enough to find stock at MSRP, this guide should help. Note that prices below discuss MSRP, as it’s impossible to stay current with today’s volatile pricing.

The next-gen Nvidia GeForce RTX 30-series and AMD Radeon RX 6000-series have yet to trickle down to more mainstream price points, an understandable twist given how much graphics cards currently sell for. That said, the (ostensibly) $330 GeForce RTX 3060 is a decent option for high refresh rate 1080p gaming if you can get your hands on one, while the $379 Radeon RX 6600 XT is even faster yet. They’re overkill if you’re gaming on a standard 60Hz display, however, and going for $500 to $700 on the streets, so you may have a better time finding an older, less powerful GPU if you’re lacking a high refresh rate display. Both would also be uninspiring on account of their high sticker prices if the GPU market wasn’t absolutely bonkers right now.

The GeForce RTX 1660, 1660 Super, and 1660 Ti are all good 1080p gaming options for 60Hz panels, as is AMD’s older Radeon RX 5600 XT and 5700. The GeForce RTX 2060 is also worth considering if you want ray tracing and DLSS capabilities. Even older options like the Radeon RX 580 and 590 or Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1060 can do in a pinch, though you’ll need to make some visual compromises as they’re really starting to show their age.

Best 1440p graphics card

Editor’s note: Demand is through the roof for graphics cards right now. Newer models sell out instantly and often cost hundreds of dollars more than MSRP. Even older-generation graphics cards are selling for more than what they cost new, years ago. We can’t recommend people buy graphics cards at those markups, but if you’re lucky enough to find stock at MSRP, this guide should help. Note that prices below discuss MSRP, as it’s impossible to stay current with today’s volatile pricing.

If you’re looking to drive a 1440p display at 60-plus frames per second (and often much higher) with no graphical compromises, Nvidia’s $400 GeForce RTX 3060 Ti is a “virtually flawless” option. It’s faster than last generation’s $800 RTX 2080 Super—the second most powerful GPU in the world until a few months ago. “That performance paired with 8GB of GDDR6 memory makes the GeForce RTX 3060 Ti a fantastic 1440p gaming option,” we said in our review. “It exceeds the hallowed 60-frames-per-second mark in every game tested at that resolution, even with the most strenuous visual settings enabled. It flies well beyond that mark in several games, and it should have no problem holding 90 fps+ at 1440p in most titles if you don’t mind performing minor tuning on graphics options.”

The GeForce RTX 3060 Ti performs ray tracing better than AMD’s most expensive GPUs, thanks in no small part to Nvidia’s fantastic DLSS 2.0 technology. It’s also capable of fine 4K gaming, but the 8GB of memory could hold it back future 4K games.

If you have a 120Hz+ 1440p monitor, the $500 GeForce RTX 3070 is also worth considering, but it’s only 9 percent to 15 percent faster than the RTX 3060 Ti at 1440p depending on the game for 25 percent more cash. That makes the RTX 3060 Ti a better option for most people, though the RTX 3070’s performance boost may be worthwhile if you hold onto your graphics cards for an especially long time before upgrading again.

The $600 GeForce RTX 3070 Ti is very slightly faster than that, although it comes with much faster GDDR6X memory. Most people should get the 3060 Ti if they can find one at a semi-reasonable price.

The GeForce RTX 3070 (and 3060 Ti) only has 8GB of GDDR6 memory. That might not be enough for 4K gaming going forward, but it’s fine for 1440p in most scenarios—but not all. Watch Dogs Legion, for example, uses more than 8GB of VRAM at 1440p if you crank up the graphics settings and turn on real-time ray tracing. If you’re leery, consider buying the $580 Radeon RX 6800 instead. You pay a bit more for a bit faster performance, but more importantly, AMD loaded the Radeon RX 6800 with an ample 16GB of GDDR6 memory. Nvidia’s RTX 30-series cards are much, much better at ray tracing, however—and $80 cheaper.

The step-down AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT comes with 12GB of VRAM. It delivers great 1440p gaming performance that’s a little bit faster than the RTX 3060 Ti, but at $479 and up, it’s priced more in-tune with the RTX 3070, and that comparison does it no favors. 

Turning back to Nvidia, the $330 GeForce RTX 3060 also offers an ample 12GB of memory (thanks for the market pressure, AMD!) along with a good entry-level 1440p experience. You may need to turn down the graphics settings a bit in especially intense games to hit 60fps, but this should have no problem surpassing that hallowed target in every title. 

If you’re looking to max out a high refresh-rate 1440p monitor, or drive a 3440×1440 ultrawide monitor, Nvidia’s $700 GeForce RTX 3080 and AMD’s $650 Radeon RX 6800 XT are stellar options that trade blows in raw performance. Even with all the visual settings cranked to Ultra, these monstrous cards deliver above 100fps at 1440p resolution across the 10+ games we tested, and often well above. The RTX 3080 and Radeon RX 6800 XT deliver over 50 percent more performance than the RTX 2080 as a baseline across the board and beat even the RTX 2080 Ti by a healthy margin.

All of these options are also fast enough to play ray traced games at a smooth clip at 1440p—something you couldn’t say with older RTX 20-series cards. You may need to tweak some visual options back when enabling ray tracing on AMD’s cards, however, while faster RT cores and DLSS technology mean you won’t need to make the same sacrifices with Nvidia’s GPU. AMD holds the memory capacity edge once again, however, at 16GB of GDDR6 versus 10GB of GDDR6X in the RTX 3080, but that shouldn’t matter too much at 1440p resolution.

Don’t buy the RTX 3080 or Radeon RX 6800 if you only have a 60Hz 1440p monitor. They’re expensive overkill unless you have a 120Hz-plus 1440p monitor that can put it ludicrous speeds to good use. They’re a fine pairing with a 60Hz 3440×1440 ultrawide display, though, as that higher resolution is more demanding.

Best 4K graphics card

The same concerns we listed about last-gen cards in our 1440p section continue here. The arrival of the new generation of Radeon and GeForce GPUs immediately turned most high-end cards from before into horrible values, and prices for all graphics cards are crazy right now, but you have more options among premium GPUs if you’re lucky enough to get your hands on one.

The biggest considerations between AMD and Nvidia up here in the high end? Ray tracing and memory capacity. AMD’s Radeon 6000-series GPUs come with massive 16GB memory pools that should handle everything games throw at them for the foreseeable future. By contrast, Nvidia wasn’t quite as generous with the memory in its RTX lineup, and some rare, especially strenuous games are already pushing GeForce VRAM limits. But the RTX 30-series offer vastly superior ray tracing performance, both in raw horsepower and with the huge uplift provided by DLSS 2.0 supersampling, which AMD currently has no answer for. Ray tracing is picking up steam now that it’s in the next-gen consoles but remains relatively rare in today’s games, however.

Pick your poison; these are all great graphics cards.

If you’re on a $500 budget, or trying to power a 60Hz 4K monitor, the $500 GeForce RTX 3070 is worth considering. It’s just as fast as the former $1,200 RTX 2080 Ti flagship and exceeds or flirts with the 60fps mark in most—but not all—games at 4K resolution with graphics settings maxed out. Be warned that you’ll need to dial the visuals in some games back to hit 60fps, though, and the card can struggle if you turn on ray tracing in games that support it.

The RTX 3070’s modest 8GB memory buffer isn’t likely to be very future-proof either, as some games already exceed that capacity at 4K, so we consider Nvidia’s $500 card better for high refresh rate 1440p gaming, or 4K gaming with some small potential quality compromises. High graphics settings still look great at 4K, though the 8GB of VRAM would make me leery about buying the RTX 3070 as a long-term 4K gaming solution.

The $600 GeForce RTX 3070 Ti has faster GDDR6X memory and slightly more horsepower so it handles 4K a bit better than its non-Ti namesake, though all the same caveats generally exist for that card as well.

If you don’t want to make those occasional graphics quality tweaks or worry about whether 8GB of memory will be enough for 4K gaming in a year or two, consider AMD’s $580 Radeon RX 6800 instead. It’s a bit faster than the RTX 3070 and comes with a generous 16GB of GDDR6 memory. AMD’s Smart Access Memory technology also gives Radeon RX 6000-series graphics cards an additional speed boost when paired with a Ryzen 5000 processor in an X570 motherboard.

If you want even faster performance, or have a high refresh rate 4K monitor, step up to the $650 Radeon RX 6800 XT or $700 GeForce RTX 3080. They kick ass, take names, and trade performance blows. There are no games in our test suite that fail to clear a 60-frames-per-second average at 4K resolution with all possible visuals effects enabled on these cards, and they often exceeds that mark by far.

 The GeForce RTX 3080 and Radeon RX 6800 XT spit out frames up to 80 percent faster than the RTX 2080 in several games at 4K, and 60 percent higher in the others. They’re roughly 30 percent faster than the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, the $1,200 previous-gen flagship, and a ridonkulous 100 to 160 percent faster than the older GeForce GTX 1080. The overwhelming horsepower makes these excellent options for 3440×1440 ultrawide gaming, too.

The feature differences are especially key here. The Radeon RX 6800 XT packs a future-proof 16GB of GDDR6 memory, versus 10GB of faster GDDR6X memory in the RTX 3080. But Nvidia’s ray tracing advantage shines even brighter on the high-end, as its second-gen RT cores and DLSS technology enable 4K gaming with ray tracing enabled. AMD’s cards simply can’t play ray traced games beyond 1440p without frame rates slowing to a crawl.

Moving up yet higher, the even more monstrous GeForce RTX 3090 “BFGPU” wields 10,496 CUDA cores, SLI connectors, and a massive 24GB of that speedy GDDR6X memory. It’s a stunning value for creators who can tap into all that VRAM, and can achieve 60fps gaming at a ludicrous 8K resolution in a handful of games, but it’s only about 10 to 15 percent faster than the RTX 3080 at 4K for over twice the price. Most people should get the RTX 3080 instead for a still-superb 4K experience, but there’s no denying the GeForce RTX 3090 is the fastest gaming card on the planet—though AMD’s $999 Radeon RX 6900 XT hopes to challenge that claim when it releases on December 8.

In a surprise twist, Nvidia’s own Founders Edition cooler is phenomenal, which makes it a better buy than custom cards since the FE model sells at the card’s $1,499 MSRP, rather than coming with a steep premium. We’ve got 3440×1440 ultrawide benchmarks for the RTX 3090, too.

If you’re willing to spend four figures on a graphics card though, your best bet is the $1200 GeForce RTX 3080 Ti. It’s just as fast as the 3090 essentially, but knocks $300 off the price tag by dropping the GDDR6X memory capacity from a ludicrous 24GB down to a still-great-for-4K 12GB.

For the first time in a long time, AMD offers a rival to Nvidia’s flagship GeForce GPU, but it’s hard to recommend the $1,000 Radeon RX 6900 XT despite its steep discount against the RTX 3090. It’s only two percent slower than the RTX 3090 at 1440p gaming, so it could be worth considering for a high-refresh rate 1440p monitor, or for powering a 3440×1440 ultrawide experience, where it performs very well. It could also be a solid option for Linux users, since AMD drivers perform with much less headache there. And this card also offers much more overclocking headroom than rival GeForce GPUs if you’re into hardcore tweaking. 

But the Radeon RX 6900 XT loses to the RTX 3090 by over 9 percent at 4K gaming, and since AMD doesn’t offer a DLSS rival, ray traced games are limited to 1440p resolution—a bummer in a four-figure graphics card. And the $650 Radeon RX 6800 XT is almost as fast for $350 less, while the $700 RTX 3080 is essentially as fast at 4K with much better ray tracing performance. This is a fantastic graphics card, and it’s wonderful to see AMD competing against Nvidia at the high end after a long absence, but the Radeon RX 6900 XT doesn’t carve out a strong niche for itself. Hot-rodded custom versions of this GPU could hold a lot of potential when they hit the streets, though.

What to look for in a custom card

If you want to shop beyond the scope of our picks, know that finding the right graphics card can be tricky. Various vendors offer customized versions of every GPU. For example, you can buy different Radeon RX 6700 XT models from Sapphire, XFX, Asus, MSI, and PowerColor.

To help narrow down the options and find the right card for you, you should consider the following things when doing your research:

Overclocks: Higher-priced custom models are often overclocked out-of-the-box to varying degrees, which can lead to higher performance. Most modern custom cards offer the same essential level of performance,however.

Cooling solutions: Many graphics cards are available with custom coolers that lower temperatures and fan noise. The vast majority perform well. Liquid-cooled graphics cards run even cooler, but require extra room inside your case for the tubing and radiator. Avoid graphics cards with single-fan, blower-style cooling systems if you can help it, unless you have a small-form-factor PC or plan on using custom water-cooling blocks.

Size: Many graphics cards are of a similar size, but longer and shorter models of many GPUs exist. High-end graphics cards are starting to sport especially massive custom cooling solutions to tame their enthusiast-class GPUs. Double-check that your chosen graphics card will fit in your case before you buy.

Compatibility: Not all hardware supports a wide range of connectivity options. Higher-end graphics cards may lack DVI ports, while lower-end monitors may lack DisplayPorts. Only the most modern Radeon and GeForce graphics cards support HDMI 2.1 outputs. Ensure your graphics card and monitor can connect to each other. Likewise, make sure your power supply meets the recommended wattage for the graphics card you choose.

Real-time ray tracing and DLSS: AMD’s Radeon RX 6000-sereis graphics cards and all of Nvidia’s RTX offerings can play games with real-time ray tracing effects active. Nvidia’s RTX 30-series GPUs hold a massive advantage over everything else though, propelled even further by dedicated tensor cores for processing machine learning tasks such as Deep Learning Super Sampling, which uses AI to speed up the performance of your games with minimal hit to visual fidelity. GeForce RTX 20-series GPUs also support DLSS, but AMD has no answer for it yet, though the company is teasing a more open “FidelityFX Super Resolution” feature to rival it in the coming months.

Check out our recent reviews

Below is a list of our most recent reviews for individual graphics cards. We’ve kept it to the most current GPUs.

Sours: https://www.pcworld.com/article/416006/the-best-graphics-cards-for-pc-gaming.html
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GTX 1660 vs. GTX 1660 Super vs. GTX 1660 Ti vs. RTX 2060

Nvidia’s midrange graphics lineup is far more robust in 2020 than it was this time last year, with a much broader array of options for gamers on a budget. Being spoiled for choice does have its own drawbacks though, namely that picking the right graphics card for you is much harder.

To see how these cards stack up against one another, we’ve pitted the GTX 1660 against the GTX 1660 Super, GTX 1660 Ti, and the RTX 2060, comparing their specs and features. Which will offer the most bang for the buck?

Availability and pricing

All four of the cards we’re comparing are available for purchase right now and in a staggering array of options. The RTX 2060 is the most straightforward of the three with Nvidia’s Founders Edition acting as a firm baseline. When in stock it starts at $300 for the KO edition, while overclocked cards or those with fancy cooling solutions can cost up to $370

There are no Founders Editions for the GTX 1660 Ti and 1660 Super, but those cards debuted with a bewildering number of third-party alternatives. The former sells for between $280 and $320, while the latter starts at $230, with the most expensive versions priced at around $270. The standard 1660 is the most affordable with a starting price of $220, but as you’ll see below, that’s a hard sell considering how far it falls behind the competitively priced Super version.

There are tons to choose from when it comes to all of these Turing cards, offering different clock speeds, cooling options, and lighting features. Some are a better value than others, but the cheapest offer the best return on investment in terms of performance, as we’ll see below.

Performance

Acer Predator XB3 Gaming Monitor review

Nvidia has made a concerted effort to stagger its graphics card performance and the RTX 2060, GTX 1660 Ti, and 1660 occupy distinct price and performance brackets. A look at their raw specifications betrays the real-world performance of these cards as much almost as benchmarks have been able to do.

RTX 2060GTX 1660 TiGTX 1660 SuperGTX 1660
GPUTU106TU116TU116TU116
CUDA Cores1,9201,5361,4081,408
RT Cores30000
Tensor Cores240000
Core Clock1,365MHz1,500MHz1,530MHz1,530MHz
Boost Clock1,680MHz1,770MHz1,785MHz1,785MHz
Memory6GB GDDR66GB GDDR66GB GDDR66GB GDDR5
Memory Speed12Gbps12Gbps14Gbps8Gbps
Memory Bus Width192-bit192-bit192-bit192-bit
Memory Bandwidth336GBps288 GBps336GBps192GBps
TDP160w120w125w120w

Based on the specifications alone we can surmise that the most powerful of the three cards is the RTX 2060, followed by the GTX 1660 Ti, then GTX 1660 Super, with the GTX 1660 trailing in the rear. The steps from each card are a little different, however. While clock speeds are relatively comparable across all four cards (and actually a little higher on the lower-end cards), the drop in CUDA cores from the RTX 2060 to the 1660 Ti is the main differentiating factor in performance. While the 1660 does take a step down in CUDA cores too, its use of GDDR5 memory leads to a 33 percent reduction in memory bandwidth.

That’s also where the GTX 1660 Super makes up its lower CUDA core count. With faster memory, it is much closer in performance to the 1660 Ti than its other specifications might suggest.

These differences play out like you might expect in games, although there is some variation depending on your desired quality settings and resolution. In all tests the RTX 2060 comes out well ahead of its GTX Turing counterparts, offering performance comparable to a GTX 1070 Ti, if not sometimes higher. The 1660 Ti follows up with between 15 and 25 percent lower frame rates, though it does beat important AMD competitors like the RX 590. It even poses a real challenge to the Vega 56 in some cases.

The GTX 1660 Super is typically within only a few frames per second of the 1660 Ti, making it arguably the most competitive buy among the 1660s. Especially since its price is so close to that of the stock 1660.

The GTX 1660 has a strong showing against a number of cards, providing a 10-20 percent improvement over the GTX 1060 6GB in most cases. It too challenges or exceeds the RX 590 and 580 in a number of games at both 1080p and 1440p, but falls behind the 1660 Ti by between 10 and 25 percent depending on the game being tested.

Ray tracing and DLSS

Metro Exodus Review

Although the RTX 2060 has hardware-accelerated ray tracing support, the other cards do support it too, albeit in a limited capacity. Thanks to a driver update from Nvidia, all GTX cards from the 16 and 10-series can render ray tracing in-game, but without hardware acceleration using RT cores, performance isn’t great, even on high-end last-gen cards like the GTX 1080 Ti.

The difficulty with ray-traced lighting effects is that they are exceedingly GPU intensive to render. That’s why the RT cores are required and make such a difference on RTX cards; especially the higher-end ones. If you want to play ray traced games at comfortable frame rates, the RTX 2060 is the only card to opt for in this case, though it will still be limited to 1080p in most games. The GTX 16-series cards will let you get a look at what ray tracing looks like, but they won’t be able to play many ray-traced games at anything close to comfortable frame rates.

With that in mind, it’s unfortunate that deep learning super sampling support (DLSS) is restricted to RTX graphics cards. It requires Tensor cores to run and the GTX 1660, 1660 Super, and 1660 Ti just don’t have them, so they will not be able to use DLSS. The RTX 2060 can, and that could give it a further advantage when it comes to ray tracing, although the highly limited number of supported games right now makes it somewhat negligible. Furthermore, our experience of both features combined hasn’t been stellar so far.

You get what you pay for

GTX 1660 Super

If $300 – $350 is too high of a price tag for you, then the GTX 1660 Super is the best value option of the bunch. The 1660 Ti is only a worthwhile investment if you can find it at a comparable cost. The level of performance is so close between the two cards that the Super, with its typical $50 to $100 savings, is a much better buy. It almost invalidates the RX 590 from AMD, although we occasionally see some heavily discounted RX 590s, which makes it an attractive alternative.

While the GTX 1660 is a solid choice, we wouldn’t put it at the top of our list. We think that for the same price, the AMD offers superior performance. That said, the GTX 1660 has vastly improved from the previous GTX 1060 model. The RX 580 and RX 590 are both viable alternatives. They can also be notably cheaper in some cases, especially when you factor in AMD’s incredible game bundles. This is where the availability and packaging options can make or break a deal. Packages are almost always a smarter option (and a better deal) than standalone cards. It’s important to note that availability (and retailer sales) can also factor into the equation and impact pricing. If you are looking for something a little more affordable with a similar speed, check out the RX 5500 XT.

These days, we don’t recommend springing for the factory overclocked versions. Factory overclocked items and stock items currently function equally, so overclocked items no longer boast the superiority they did in past generations. The price difference between factory overclocked items and the 1660 Super is too close to make them worth it.

Overall, the RTX 2060 is the best buy of the three because of its impressive performance capabilities. It has also received the most five-star reviews. It’s the kind of quality product you’ll have to pay a pretty penny for, and we know that it might be out of your reach if you’re on a modest budget. It still blows the Turing product competition out of the water and provides far better value for the price. Over time, it’s worth the investment for the RTX 2060 — even if you have to spend some time saving up to buy it.

Editors' Recommendations

Sours: https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/gtx-1660-vs-gtx-1660-ti-vs-rtx-2060/

GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB Super Graphics Card

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Availability Checker

How and when can you get hold of your selections? Finding out should be quick and easy, so with just a few clicks our Availability Checker shows you:

  • Delivery dates, time-slots and prices
  • Local stores with stock you can collect from now
  • Local stores you can get items sent to for you to collect later
To use our Availability Checker, simply:

  1. Enter a town or postcode in the box on the product page for an item you’ve selected
  2. Click on the magnifying glass
  3. Review the delivery and collection options local to you – just click on any one to add it to your basket

Stock updates

Find something you want but it’s not in stock? On the item’s product page, simply click on ‘Email me when back in stock’, and let us have your email address. We’ll let you know as soon as it’s available again.

Returns and refunds

Whether an item you’ve bought is faulty or damaged, or you’ve changed your mind, it’s easy to get a refund.

Items you haven’t opened
Within 21 days of receiving an item you paid for online, on the phone, or in store you can return it for a full refund – provided your purchase is still in its original and unopened packaging. This promise is in addition to your statutory rights.

Items you’ve opened
Within 14 days of receiving an item you paid for online or on the phone, you can return it, even if you’ve opened it. To receive a refund, you must:

  • Let us know you plan to return the item within 14 days of delivery/collection
  • Physically return it within a further 14 days.
The item must be returned in ‘as new condition’ – not used or installed, and in its original packaging. More on returns and refunds.

Order online and collect in store

Order & Collect ­­– The majority of our stores are now open and offering a collection service, allowing you to safely order online and collect from store contact-free.

Our stores with parking available can offer a Drive Thru collection experience using the parking bays clearly marked outside the store. Here’s how it works;

  • Once you’ve had confirmation your order is ready to collect, drive to the store.
  • When you’ve arrived, click on the link in your confirmation email to let our team know.
  • One of our colleagues will put your order in your car boot.

Stores, including those which DO NOT have parking outside, can still offer a safe Walk Up service. We have safety measures in place to keep you and our staff protected whilst you queue. Here’s how it works;

  • Once you’ve had confirmation your order is ready to collect, walk to store and head to the collection point.
  • When you’ve arrived, click on the link in your confirmation email to let our team know.
  • You’ll get a text when our colleague is preparing your order for collection.
  • Please remember to keep 2 metres away from our colleagues and other customers.

If the store already has stock of your item, you may be able to collect on the same day. If your store doesn’t have stock, we can get some in, but it may take a little longer. Don’t forget to wait for your ready to collect email and check store opening hours and whether the store can offer Drive Thru, Walk Up or both collection options before heading out.

We strongly recommend that you check whether you will be able to carry the item, or whether it will fit in your vehicle before placing your order.

Creation - your plan Flexible credit you control

To spread the cost, pay with Your Plan, available at first on orders £99 and over. Exclusions apply. With this uniquely flexible credit option you can:

  • Spread the cost with monthly payments (24.9% APR representative)
  • Choose the payment term that suits you from 12 to 36 months
  • Shop today with no deposit to pay, and even pay everything off early at no extra cost
Plus once you’ve opened a Your Plan account, you can use it to shop on credit in the future on purchases £99 and over. Exclusions apply.

Learn more

How to apply

If you’re buying this item online, you can apply for credit at checkout, select delivery at checkout as credit is currently unavailable on order & collect purchases. Or if you’re planning on shopping in-store, apply here.

Currys Group Limited acts as a credit broker and not a lender. Credit is provided by Creation Consumer Finance Ltd.
Both Currys Group Limited and Creation Consumer Finance Ltd are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.
Sours: https://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computing-accessories/components-upgrades/graphics-cards/gigabyte-geforce-gtx-1660-6-gb-super-graphics-card-10201754-pdt.html

1660 super buy

  • MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Super Ventus XS OC HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 204 mm, 2019

    Rank 4

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual EVO OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 242 mm, 2019

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    from£256.80£266.74 Incl. delivery

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  • EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super SC Ultra HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 202.1 mm, 2019

    Rank 45

    from£293.50£300.68 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super TUF Gaming X3 OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 264 mm, 2019

    Rank 58

    from£258.80£258.80 Incl. delivery

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  • Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 Super Twin Fan HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 173.4 mm, 2019

    Rank 72

    from£272.39£272.39 Incl. delivery

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  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 Super OC HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 225.65 mm, 2019

    Rank 83

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super Phoenix OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 174 mm, 2019

    Rank 111

    from£235.20£245.15 Incl. delivery

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  • MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Super Gaming X HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 247 mm, 2019

    Rank 126

    from£249.86£249.86 Incl. delivery

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  • Palit GeForce GTX 1660 Super StormX HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 168 mm, 2019

    Rank 171

    from£255.00£344.97 Incl. delivery

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  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 Super D6 HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 2021

    Rank 307

    from£348.80£355.98 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super TUF Gaming HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 206 mm, 2019

    Rank 319

    from£234.48£234.48 Incl. delivery

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  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 Super Gaming OC HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 280 mm, 2019

    Rank 385

    from£243.22£250.41 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual Mini OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 197 mm, 2020

    Rank 403

    from£243.42£243.42 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super TUF Gaming OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 206 mm, 2019

    Rank 516

    from£297.08£304.26 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super TUF Gaming X3 Advanced HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 264 mm, 2019

    Rank 547

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super ROG Strix Gaming OC 2xHDMI 2xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 2019

    Rank 551

    from£324.99£332.17 Incl. delivery

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  • MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Super Ventus OC HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 231 mm, 2020

    Rank 675

    from£276.70£283.88 Incl. delivery

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  • MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Super Aero ITX OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 179 mm, 2019

    Rank 690

    from£326.66£333.84 Incl. delivery

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  • Palit GeForce GTX 1660 Super StormX OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 168 mm, 2019

    Rank 691

    from£237.43£237.43 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super ROG Strix Gaming 2xHDMI 2xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 2019

    Rank 719

    from£282.00£326.20 Incl. delivery

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  • PNY Geforce GTX 1660 Super Single Fan HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 168 mm, 2019

    Rank 724

    from£257.48£264.66 Incl. delivery

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  • Palit GeForce GTX 1660 Super GamingPro OC HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 235 mm, 2019

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    from£239.87£239.87 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual EVO Advanced HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 242 mm, 2019

    Rank 727

    from£306.06£313.24 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super ROG Strix Gaming Advanced 2xHDMI 2xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 243 mm, 2019

    Rank 738

    from£322.01£329.19 Incl. delivery

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  • Gigabyte Aorus GeForce GTX 1660 Super HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 2020

    Rank 740

    from£249.23£256.42 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super Phoenix HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 174 mm, 2019

    Rank 781

    from£289.08£296.26 Incl. delivery

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super TUF Gaming X3 HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 264 mm, 2019

    Rank 782

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  • Asus GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual EVO HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 242 mm, 2019

    Rank 817

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  • PNY GeForce GTX 1660 Super Dual Fan HDMI DP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 115 mm, 2019

    Rank 823

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  • Zotac GeForce GTX 1660 Super AMP! Edition HDMI 3xDP 6GBGeForce GTX 1660 Super, 6GB, GDDR6, Active, 209.6 mm, 2019

    Rank 1332

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Sours: https://pricespy.co.uk/c/graphics-cards?532=32763
The GTX 1660 Super in 2021! Still Worth It?

But she remembers a tiny girl, and I grew up a long time ago. No, Mon, my home is the Temple, my destiny is Service to God. - Maybe you are right. - agreed the demoness. - Can I ask you.

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Once inside, she quickly found her parents without attracting attention, wanting to be with them for now, at least until she got used to the environment. They each took a drink and they began to explore the place. Only a few people were already naked or kissing or having oral sex, but it was still pretty early, so that's okay.

Marina has already informed her that the average age at this event will be from 40 to 50 years. There were several pairs of 30-40 years old, but apparently, she was the youngest here.



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