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Lee Zeldin

U.S. Representative from New York

Lee Michael Zeldin (born January 30, 1980) is an American attorney, member of Congress, and officer in the United States Army Reserve. A Republican, he has represented New York's 1st congressional district in the United States House of Representatives since 2015. He represents the eastern two-thirds of Suffolk County, including most of Smithtown, the entirety of Brookhaven, Riverhead, Southold, Southampton, East Hampton, Shelter Island, and a small portion of Islip. From 2011 to 2014, Zeldin served as a member of the New York State Senate from the 3rd Senate District.

During Donald Trump's presidency, Zeldin was a staunch Trump ally. He prominently defended Trump during his first impeachment hearings in relation to the Trump–Ukraine scandal. After Trump lost the 2020 presidential election and made false claims of fraud, Zeldin objected to the certification of the election results in Congress.[2][3][4][5]

In April 2021, Zeldin announced his candidacy for governor of New York in 2022.[6]

Early life and education[edit]

Zeldin was born in East Meadow, New York, the son of Merrill Schwartz and David Zeldin.[7][8] He was raised in Suffolk County, New York,[9] and graduated from William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach, New York, in 1998.[10] He also attended Hebrew school.[11]

Zeldin received a bachelor's degree in political science from the SUNY University at Albany in 2001.[10][12] He received a Juris Doctor from Albany Law School in May 2003.[8][10] In 2004, he was admitted to the New York State Bar.[13]

Military service and legal practice[edit]

Zeldin received an Army ROTC commission as a second lieutenant, and served in the United States Army from 2003 to 2007,[11][14] first in the Military Intelligence Corps.[11] In 2006, he was deployed to Tikrit, Iraq, with an infantry battalion of paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Zeldin also served as a prosecutor in the Judge Advocate General's Corps and as a military magistrate. In 2007, he transitioned from active duty to the Army Reserve, where he achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel.[9]

In 2007, Zeldin became an attorney for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.[15] In 2008, he started a general-practice law firm in Smithtown, New York. He operated it full-time until he was elected to New York's 3rd State Senate district in 2010.[9]

New York Senate (2011–2014)[edit]

In 2010 Zeldin ran in the New York State Senate's 3rd district, challenging Democratic incumbent Brian X. Foley. Zeldin defeated Foley with 58% of the vote.[16] He was reelected in 2012, defeating Democrat Francis Genco with 56% of the vote.[17]

In January 2011, a bill co-sponsored by Zeldin that provided for a 2% property tax cap became law.[18]

In June 2011, Zeldin voted against the Marriage Equality Act, which the Senate passed 33–29.[19] In a statement after the bill passed, he said: "It is my belief that marriage should be defined as between a man and a woman."[20]

In December 2011, Zeldin supported a $250 million cut to the MTA payroll tax.[21][22]

In March 2012, Zeldin created the PFC Joseph DwyerPTSD Peer-to-Peer Veterans Support program as part of the 2012–13 New York State Budget.[23][24]

Zeldin did not vote on the NY SAFE Act, a gun control bill that passed the New York State Senate on January 14, 2013,[25] and later became law.[26] He missed the vote because he was in Virginia on Army Reserve duty.[27] In a statement released to the press after the vote, he said he would have voted against the measure.[28]

In February 2014, Zeldin introduced a bill that sought to halt implementation of the Common Core curriculum for three years.[29]

In March 2014, Zeldin voted against the New York Dream Act.[30][31]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

Elections[edit]

2008

See also: 2008 United States House of Representatives elections in New York § District 1

In 2008, Zeldin challenged incumbent Representative Tim Bishop in New York's 1st congressional district. Bishop defeated Zeldin, 58%–42%.[32]

2014

See also: 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in New York § District 1

On October 6, 2013, Zeldin announced he would again seek the Republican nomination to run against Bishop.[33][34] His state senate district included much of the congressional district's western portion.

Zeldin defeated George Demos in the Republican primary[35] and ran unopposed for the Conservative Party nomination in the June 24 primary. On November 4, he defeated Bishop with 54% of the vote.[36][37][38]

2016

See also: 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in New York § District 1

In February 2015, the National Republican Congressional Committee announced that Zeldin was one of 12 members in the Patriot Program, a program designed to help protect vulnerable Republican incumbents in the 2016 election.[39][40]

In the 2016 Republican primary, Zeldin faced no opposition. In the November 8 general election, he faced Democratic nominee Anna Throne-Holst, a member of the Southampton Town Board.[41] Zeldin won with 58% of the vote.[42]

2018

See also: 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in New York § District 1

Zeldin ran unopposed in the 2018 Republican primary. In the November general election his chief opponent was Democratic nominee Perry Gershon, who also had the endorsement of the Working Families Party.[43]

Zeldin's 2018 campaign featured fundraisers with Breitbart News founder Steve Bannon[44] and Sebastian Gorka. At the Gorka event, reporters from local news outlets were removed.[45]

Zeldin defeated Gershon, 51.5%–47.4%.[46]

2020

See also: 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in New York § District 1

Zeldin ran unopposed in the Republican primary. In the November 3, general election, he defeated Democratic nominee Nancy Goroff,[47][48] 54.9%-45.1%.[49]

Tenure[edit]

Zeldin is one of two Jewish Republicans in Congress.[50][51]

Committee assignments[edit]

Caucus memberships[edit]

2022 gubernatorial campaign[edit]

Main article: 2022 New York gubernatorial election

In April 2021, Zeldin announced he would run for governor of New York in 2022.[56]

On April 30, 2021, Zeldin announced that Erie and Niagara counties' Republican party chairs had endorsed his campaign, giving him the necessary 50% of state committee support to gain the Republican nomination.[57][58] In June 2021, Zeldin was named the "presumed nominee" of the Republican party by Republican state chair Nick Langworthy after he earned 85% of a straw poll vote of county leaders, and was also called the "presumptive nominee" of the Conservative Party of New York State by Conservative state chair Gerard Kassar.[59][60] As of August 2021, Zeldin has been endorsed by 49 of New York's 62 county Republican party chairs, roughly 84% of the state's weighted vote.[61]

Zeldin's campaign reportedly raised $4 million during the first half of 2021.[62][63]

At a July 23, 2021, meeting with supporters in Dansville, Zeldin was asked how he defined critical race theory and claimed that the framework is based on the foundation "that white students today should feel inferior and owe something to repay the colored students in their class based off of something that happened generations earlier." When the Livingston County News contacted Zeldin's campaign to explain his use of the term "colored students", a spokesperson for the campaign responded: “He rejects that term, which was a key part of his point. In that recording, Congressman Zeldin is emphatically rejecting critical race theory, and all destructive race based teachings, policies and terminologies that wrongfully pit people against each other based on the color of their skin. It is indisputable that Congressman Zeldin was clearly telling you what he was against and not what he was for.”[64]

Political positions[edit]

Education[edit]

In July 2015, Zeldin attached an amendment to the Student Success Act to allow states to opt out of Common Core without penalty.[65] The amendment was passed and signed into law.[66]

Environment[edit]

In April 2015, Zeldin and Senator Charles Schumer introduced the Fluke Fairness Act. The bill would have changed the current system for managing fluke fishing quotas by creating a regional approach to updating quotas and standards based on geographic, scientific, and economic data.[67] It did not pass.[68]

On July 15, 2015, Zeldin introduced the Exclusive Economic Zone Clarification Act.[69] The bill proposed to amend the boundary in part of the federal Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). It would give fisheries management of Block Island Sound exclusively to New York and Rhode Island. (Some Connecticut fishermen alleged that the bill could put them out of business.)[70] The bill died in committee.[71]

In September 2015, Zeldin and Citizens Campaign for the Environment executive director Adrienne Esposito condemned a proposed federal plan for dumping of dredged materials, saying, "We can't just assume that dumping these waste spoils in the Long Island Sound is environmentally benign."[72][73]

In April 2018, Zeldin said he did not support the Paris Accords in their form at that time. He expressed concern about "other countries that are contributing to very adverse impacts on our climate but not having the level of responsibility that they need to have in stepping up and making a positive change in their own countries".[74]

Foreign affairs[edit]

In January 2016, the New York Post reported that Zeldin was a no-show in 2015 at 12 of 18 House Committee on Foreign Affairs hearings that dealt specifically with ISIL and with Syria.[75][76]

In February 2016, Zeldin and Representatives Mike Pompeo and Frank LoBiondo sought visas to travel to Iran to check the country's compliance with the Iran nuclear deal framework.[77][78] In June Iran called the request a "publicity stunt" and said it would deny the visas.[79]

Health care[edit]

In May 2015 Zeldin voted for H.R.36, a bill he co-sponsored, which would prohibit abortions in cases where the probable age of the fetus is 20 weeks or later, and would impose criminal penalties on doctors who violate the ban.[80]

In 2015, Zeldin co-sponsored two bills in Congress to combat Lyme disease, the Tick-Borne Disease Research and Accountability and Transparency Act of 2015[81] and the 21st Century Cures Act.[82][83]

On September 18, 2015, Zeldin voted for the Defund Planned Parenthood Act of 2015,[84] a bill that would defund Planned Parenthood for one year unless the organization agreed not to provide abortion services.[85][86]

On May 4, 2017, Zeldin voted to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) and pass the American Health Care Act.[87][88][89]

Israel[edit]

Zeldin has said that Israel is "America's strongest ally" and that Congress must "protect Israel's right to self-defense".[14] In 2016, he spoke in support of the anti-Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) legislation that passed the New York State Senate. In March 2017, he co-sponsored a bipartisan bill in the House of Representatives, the Israel Anti-Boycott Act, to oppose boycotts of Israel and "further combat the anti-Israel boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement".[90] He supported the Trump administration's decision to relocate the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem in May 2018 as part of the United States recognition of Jerusalem as capital of Israel.[91]

Land management[edit]

In April 2016, Zeldin introduced legislation to prevent the federal government's sale of Plum Island to the highest bidder.[92] The next month, his bill unanimously passed the House.[93]

LGBT rights[edit]

As a New York state senator in 2011, Zeldin voted against the Marriage Equality Act,[94] which legalized same-sex marriage in the state.[95] In June 2015, after the United States Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v. Hodges that state-level bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional, Zeldin would not comment about his view of same-sex marriage, but indicated he believed the issue should have been decided at the state level.[96] A month later, he co-sponsored the First Amendment Defense Act,[97] a bill "to protect individuals and institutions from punitive action by the government – such as revoking tax exempt status or withholding federal grants or benefits – for believing that marriage is between one man and one woman and for opposing sex outside of marriage".[98] Critics of the measure said it would enable people to violate same-sex couples' and their children's legal rights by discriminating against them.[99][100][101] In May 2019, Zeldin voted against the Equality Act.[102][103][104]

Taxes[edit]

In November 2017, Zeldin said he was not yet satisfied with the proposed Republican tax bill. He cited his concerns with the elimination of the state and local tax deduction. The same month, House Speaker Paul Ryan canceled plans to attend a fundraiser for Zeldin after Zeldin voted against the House version of the bill.[105] In December, Zeldin called the tax bill "a geographic redistribution of wealth" that takes money from some states while providing tax relief to others. He suggested that the removal of the state tax deduction could have been implemented gradually.[106][107]

Zeldin voted against the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, which passed in December 2017.[108] He supported the corporate tax cuts in the bill but did not approve of the limit for property tax deductions, preferring a cap of $20,000 or $25,000 to the $10,000 cap in the bill.[109]

Trump administration[edit]

On May 3, 2016, Zeldin endorsed Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee.[110] Zeldin had previously indicated that he would support whoever won the Republican nomination.[111] During the campaign, Zeldin faulted Trump for a comment about Khizr and Ghazala Khan, a Gold Star family whose son Humayun, a captain in the Army, was killed during the Iraq War, but said he would continue to support Trump's candidacy.[112]

During Trump's presidency, Zeldin was a staunch Trump supporter.[113]

In 2017, Zeldin supported Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, saying it offered the FBI a chance at a "fresh start" to rebuild trust.[114] In May 2018, Zeldin called for the criminal prosecution of former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe.[115] Also that month Zeldin called for creating a special counsel investigation into the FBI and the DOJ regarding their investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections.[116] Zeldin said the investigations were launched with "insufficient intelligence and biased motivations", with surveillance warrants for Trump campaign staffers obtained in "deeply flawed and questionable" ways.[116] He called for an investigation into the FBI's decision to conclude its investigation into the Hillary Clinton email controversy.[116][117]

During the 2018–19 United States federal government shutdown, Zeldin voted with the Republican caucus against the appropriations measure to fund the federal government. He instructed the House to withhold his pay until the shutdown ended, saying: "It's crazy to me that members of Congress get paid while other federal employees do not."[118]

Zeldin defended Trump amid the Trump–Ukraine scandal, which set off an impeachment inquiry against Trump over his request that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky investigate Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden. Zeldin said in October 2019, "It is crystal clear... that any allegation that President Trump was trying to get President Zelensky to manufacture dirt on the Bidens is just not true."[119]

In the seven impeachment deposition transcripts released as of November 2019, no Republican had spoken more than Zeldin, who is referenced more than 550 times.[120]

In December 2020, Zeldin was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Biden defeated[121] Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[122][123][124] When asked in January 2021 to respond to the release of an audio recording of a phone call in which Trump pressured Georgia's Secretary of State to overturn the 2020 election and "find" enough votes for him to win, Zeldin responded by criticizing the media.[125]

On January 6, 2021, Zeldin objected to the official certification of the results of the 2020 presidential election in Congress.[126][127] A violent, armed mob of Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol that day, inspired by allegations of election fraud. Zeldin disavowed the violence and defended himself against protesters at his Patchogue office who linked his embrace of election-fraud theories to the Capitol attack and called on him to resign.[128] On January 7, he publicly acknowledged for the first time that Biden would be the next president.[129]

Veterans affairs[edit]

In February 2015, Zeldin introduced his first bill, to eliminate the dollar limit for loans that the United States Department of Veterans Affairs can guarantee for a veteran.[130] In February 2016 he proposed federal legislation to fund a three-year, $25-million nationwide veterans' peer-support program modeled on one he helped establish while in the New York State Senate.[131]

Personal life[edit]

Zeldin was raised within Conservative Judaism,[132] and his wife, Diana, is Mormon.[133] The couple have identical twin daughters, Mikayla and Arianna.[134][9] They live in Shirley, New York.[9] On September 18, 2021, Zeldin announced that he had been diagnosed with leukemia in November 2020, but was now in remission.[135]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  105. ^Goldmacher, Shane (November 29, 2017). "Paul Ryan Cancels Fund-Raiser for Lee Zeldin Over Tax Bill Vote". New York Times. Retrieved September 5, 2018.
  106. ^Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin On His Opposition To GOP Tax Bill, NPR, November 3, 2017.
  107. ^GOP congressman votes 'no' on tax bill, calls it a 'geographic redistribution of wealth', CNBC.com; December 20, 2017.
  108. ^Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). "How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill". The New York Times. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  109. ^"GOP congressman votes 'no' on tax bill, calls it a 'geographic redistribution of wealth'". Yahoo! Finance. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  110. ^Brune, Tom (May 4, 2016). "Reps. Peter King, Lee Zeldin endorse Donald Trump for president". Newsday. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  111. ^Clancy, Ambrose (March 3, 2016). "Zeldin will support whoever GOP nominates". Suffolk Times. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  112. ^Brune, Tom (August 2, 2016). "Peter King, Lee Zeldin fault Donald Trump for dispute with Khans". Newsday. Retrieved August 16, 2016.
  113. ^"Zeldin to object to count of electoral votes". Newsday. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  114. ^"With Comey out, Schumer urges special prosecutor". Newsday. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  115. ^Hooper, Molly K. (May 23, 2018). "WATCH: NY Republican wants McCabe prosecuted". TheHill. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  116. ^ abcBeavers, Olivia (May 22, 2018). "House conservatives introduce resolution calling for second special counsel". TheHill. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  117. ^Jeremy Herb; Daniella Diaz. "Republicans renew push for second special counsel". CNN. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
  118. ^Civiletti, Denise (January 4, 2019). "In the new minority: Rep. Lee Zeldin's first day of his third term in Congress". riverheadlocal.com. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Zeldin

 

Rep. Lee Zeldin

Committee Membership

Lee Zeldin sits on the following committees:

  • House Committee on Financial Services
  • House Committee on Foreign Affairs

Enacted Legislation

Zeldin was the primary sponsor of 3 bills that were enacted:

View All »

Does 3 not sound like a lot? Very few bills are ever enacted — most legislators sponsor only a handful that are signed into law. But there are other legislative activities that we don’t track that are also important, including offering amendments, committee work and oversight of the other branches, and constituent services.

We consider a bill enacted if one of the following is true: a) it is enacted itself, b) it has a companion bill in the other chamber (as identified by Congress) which was enacted, or c) if at least about half of its provisions were incorporated into bills that were enacted (as determined by an automated text analysis, applicable beginning with bills in the 110th Congress).

Voting Record

Key Votes

Zeldin voted Nay

H.R. 1: Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Passed 224/201 on Dec 20, 2017.


## Update \#4 --- Dec. 17, 2017 House and Senate Republicans have come to an agreement on the tax bill, H.R. 1, which they intend ...

Zeldin voted Nay

H.R. 1: Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Passed 227/203 on Dec 19, 2017.


## Update \#4 --- Dec. 17, 2017 House and Senate Republicans have come to an agreement on the tax bill, H.R. 1, which they intend ...

Zeldin voted No

Missed Votes

From Jan 2015 to Oct 2021, Zeldin missed 58 of 3,802 roll call votes, which is 1.5%. This is on par with the median of 2.1% among the lifetime records of representatives currently serving. The chart below reports missed votes over time.

We don’t track why legislators miss votes, but it’s often due to medical absenses and major life events.

Show the numbers...

Time PeriodVotes EligibleMissed VotesPercentPercentile
2015 Jan-Mar14400.0%0th
2015 Apr-Jun24400.0%0th
2015 Jul-Sep13910.7%31st
2015 Oct-Dec17700.0%0th
2016 Jan-Mar13721.5%30th
2016 Apr-Jun20400.0%0th
2016 Jul-Sep23210.4%21st
2016 Nov-Dec4812.1%65th
2017 Jan-Mar20800.0%0th
2017 Apr-Jun13621.5%47th
2017 Jul-Sep19942.0%72nd
2017 Oct-Dec16700.0%0th
2018 Jan-Mar12900.0%0th
2018 Apr-Jun184137.1%84th
2018 Jul-Sep10200.0%0th
2018 Nov-Dec851618.8%89th
2019 Jan-Mar13600.0%0th
2019 Apr-Jun29410.3%21st
2019 Jul-Sep12500.0%0th
2019 Oct-Dec14674.8%79th
2020 Jan-Mar10200.0%0th
2020 Apr-Jun3100.0%0th
2020 Jul-Sep8011.2%53rd
2020 Oct-Dec40410.0%79th
2021 Jan-Mar9722.1%64th
2021 Apr-Jun10732.8%78th
2021 Jul-Sep10800.0%0th
2021 Oct-Oct100.0%0th

Primary Sources

The information on this page is originally sourced from a variety of materials, including:

Lee Zeldin is pronounced:

lee // ZEL-dun

The letters stand for sounds according to the following table:

letters

as in

l

leg

ee

meet

letters

as in

Z

zebra

E

bed

L

leg

-

 

d

day

u

cup

n

not

Capital letters indicate a stressed syllable.

Sours: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/lee_zeldin/412646
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Lee Zeldin, Perry Gershon race tests Donald Trump's popularity

The race between Republican Rep. Lee Zeldin and Democratic businessman Perry Gershon will test the popularity of President Donald Trump and the strength of the opposition to him in the traditional swing Suffolk County district that went strongly for Republicans two years ago.

The national political scene has been front-and-center for many voters, the 1st Congressional District candidates say, even as each also runs on his own agenda in hopes of winning over undecided voters by Election Day, Nov. 6.

"Trump is the 800-pound gorilla in the room," Gershon, 56 of East Hampton, said. "But Lee Zeldin is sufficiently aligned and tied to Donald Trump that I don’t need to talk much about Donald Trump. Trump is part of my story of what motivated me to be politically active, but I’m running against Lee Zeldin."

Zeldin, 38 of Shirley, said Trump is more popular in the district today than he was in 2016, when he won in the 1st by 12 percentage points

"A lot of voters are happy with the direction of the country, they're seeing the economy growing, and they want more wins come January," Zeldin, who is seeking a third term, said in an interview. "They don’t want to see a gridlocked Washington where Congress’ purpose is to oppose, impeach, resist and obstruct anything and everything." 

Gershon, he said, "hasn’t been shy in stating that his purpose for running is to join the resistance and help the resistance."

Zeldin pointed to his legislative successes such as a bill to expand adult day care for disabled veterans. Zeldin also cited his role in securing funding for an emergency dredging project at the Moriches Inlet, Long Island Sound environmental programs and local bridge repairs.

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Gershon said, if elected, he'd push for a major bipartisan infrastructure bill, such as one Trump had campaigned on, to improve highways and mass transit in the 1st District. 

Gershon also said he backs "Medicare-for-all" to provide universal health care coverage, and wants stricter gun control laws after mass shootings.

But Larry Levy, dean of the Center for Suburban Studies at Hofstra University, predicted feelings about Trump largely will largely determine the results in the district.

"If you tell me what Trump’s approval rating is in the First District, I’ll tell you Zeldin’s likely margin of victory, or loss," said Levy.

Levy noted that Zeldin has, "done something that Republican candidates in swing suburban districts around the country have avoided — tie himself directly to President Trump. He's all in."

Recent polling in the district has shown Republicans and Democrats sticking with their candidates at much higher rates than in previous years.

In a recent Siena College/New York Times poll of the 1st District, 90 percent of Republicans supported Zeldin while 87 percent of Democrats supported Gershon. Historically, 75 percent of a party's registrants would be for the party's candidate, Levy said.

"It's a level of hyper-partisanship," Levy said.

The 1st Congressional District has been Long Island's swing district.

Since the 1980s, three Republicans and two Democrats have held the seat, plus Michael Forbes who was a Republican before becoming a Democrat. Former Rep. Tim Bishop, a liberal Democrat, had the seat for 12 years before Zeldin defeated him in 2014. 

The district voted narrowly for President Barack Obama twice, but in 2016 went heavily for Trump.

The 1st District covers Brookhaven, Riverhead, Southampton, East Hampton, Shelter Island and Southold towns, as well as slices of Smithtown and Islip.

Republicans make up 34 percent of active registered voters, compared with 30 percent for Democrats. The rest are registered with minor parties or are unaffiliated with any party.

Zeldin, an attorney who served in the U.S. Army on active duty, and is still in the reserves, won election as a state senator in 2010.

Since Trump took office in 2017, Zeldin has embraced him in social media posts and cable news appearances.

He has held campaign events with Donald Trump Jr. and former Trump staffers including Seb Gorka, former deputy assistant to Trump, and Steve Bannon, former senior White House adviser.

Zeldin also has been critical of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, and has supported the hiring of a second special counsel to investigate misconduct by the Department of Justice and FBI in the 2016 presidential race.

Zeldin, however, voted against Trump's federal tax cut bill that capped the federal deduction for state and local taxes at $10,000. Zeldin said the measure represented a hardship for residents of high-tax states such as New York.

The congressman also has opposed an administration proposal to explore offshore drilling off Long Island.

Gershon, 56, a commercial real estate lender, had been registered to vote in Manhattan until last year, and had never thought about becoming a candidate.

Gershon rooted for Trump to win the 2016 Republican primary because he figured he couldn't win the general election, he said in a recent interview at his East Setauket office. Gershon said he spent the month before the general election joking, "that if Donald Trump wins, then we're going to move" out of the country. He said he was galvanized after the election to get involved in politics.

"When Trump won, that was a life-changing event for me," Gershon said.

Gershon recalled attending May 2017 fundraiser in Manhattan for U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.). Gillibrand said those who wanted to make a difference should "go run for office yourself." Gershon looked at his wife and said, "I'm going to challenge Lee Zeldin."

On the advice of Bishop and former Rep. Steve Israel, who once chaired the campaign committee for House Democrats, Gershon started fundraising, and won attention in a crowded Democratic primary field earlier this year.

Gershon raised $2.1 million for the June 26 primary, including $1.3 million he contributed and loaned himself, and won the five-way race.

Progressive groups, who had been criticizing Zeldin since Trump's inauguration, said Gershon has gained their trust.

Eileen Duffy, founder of "Let’s Visit Lee Zeldin," a closed Facebook group with 4,000 members who organized rallies against Zeldin, said Gershon is "very dedicated, and very clear from the get-go he’s a really good person and his heart is in right place. He's doing this for reasons that go beyond building up his own ego."

Steve Louro, a Nissequogue businessman who hosted an August fundraiser for Zeldin that featured Donald Trump Jr., said Zeldin is popular on his own, but the president's support helps him. Even if Trump is a polarizing national figure, "There's a hidden motivated love for Trump in our area," Louro said.

Zeldin has attacked Gershon for changing his registration from Manhattan to his East Hampton home last year.

"They're figuring out he's not one of us," Zeldin said of voters.

Gershon defended his roots in the district

"I've been a taxpayer in this district since 1999. I was married in this district. I have ties in this district. I had two homes," he said. "I tended to be in Manhattan on Election Day and I never thought about where I should be voting. In hindsight, I wish I did it differently."
On a recent weekday, Gershon introduced himself around at the Stony Brook Student Activities Center.

"I'm the Democrat running against Lee Zeldin," he said to students and workers who passed. "I'm not a fan of Trump."
"You got me. It's as easy as being blue this year," said Chassitty Fiani, 28, of Lake Grove. "We need a system of checks and balances."

Many students were unresponsive, or noncommittal about their plans to vote.

"It's a little surprising there were not stronger opinions," Gershon said after campaigning. "This is supposed to be the most polarizing time in political history."

Still, Gershon said he sees a Democratic wave hitting Suffolk County.

"I do think there's going to be a wave. I don't know how big, but I do," he said. "Democrats, when they win, win narrowly in the district here. They win when Democrats are motivated to vote."

Zeldin dismissed talk of a blue wave.

"There was an enthusiasm gap that has now been equalized where both Republicans and Democrats are motivated," he said. The confirmation hearing of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was one factor that contributed to the closing gap, he said.

Zeldin, campaigning earlier this month in a St. James over-55 community, knocked on doors accompanied by Smihtown tax receiver Deanna Varricchio, a Republican.

"It's been a privilege to represent you in Congress, and it would be an honor to continue to represent you in the nation's capital," said Zeldin as he passed out palm cards.

"You take care of the seniors, that's what's on my mind," said Peter Pellicani, 86, a retired Civil Service worker. Pellicani said he want a strong military and was concerned about people with prior medical problems. They, he said, "should be covered."

"I agree," Zeldin said.

At another house, Frank Vivona, a 74-year-old retired guidance counselor, asked Zeldin if the National Rifle Association still supported him.

"I happen to be a life member of the NRA. I support the 2nd Amendment," Zeldin said. He said "common sense solutions" like banning bump stocks, get stopped by "partisan fighting."

Vivona said while he didn't support Zeldin's support of the NRA, he'd support Zeldin.

He said he didn't know much about Gershon. 

1st Congressional District candidates

Lee M. Zeldin

Age: 38

Party: Republican,

Home: Shirley

Education/career: Bachelor’s degree, University of Albany; law degree, Albany Law School. Zeldin, who also has the Conservative, Independence and Reform ballot lines, served for four years in the U.S. Army on active duty and is currently in the Army Reserves. State senator, 2011-2014; elected to 1st Congressional District in 2014. Serves on the House Financial Services and Foreign Affairs committees.

Family: Married, two daughters.

Perry Gershon

Age: 56

Home: East Hampton

Party: Democratic

Education/career: Bachelor's degree, Yale University; MBA, University of California, Berkeley. Gershon, who also has the Working Families Party line, dropped out of medical school to open a Manhattan sports bar in 1984. After getting his MBA in 1993, he went into commercial real estate lending. He formed his own firm, LoanCore Capital, in 2007.

Family: Married with two sons.

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Sours: https://www.newsday.com/long-island/politics/lee-zeldin-perry-gershon-congress-1.22618601

Vote Smart displays all known interest group ratings for each candidate and official, regardless of issue or bias.

Keep in mind that ratings done by special interest groups often do not represent a non-partisan stance. In addition, some groups select votes that tend to favor members of one political party over another, rather than choosing votes based solely on issue concerns. Nevertheless, they can be invaluable in showing where an incumbent has stood on a series of votes in the past one or two years, especially when ratings by groups on all sides of an issue are compared. Website links, if available, and descriptions of the organizations offering performance evaluations are accessible by clicking on the name of the group.

With rare exceptions, Vote Smart displays interest group ratings as a 0-100 percentage. While many interest groups use percentages as ratings to begin with, please note that Vote Smart has translated some ratings to a percentage from a different rating system for consistency and ease in understanding. Please visit the group's website, email us at [email protected] or call our Voter Information Hotline at 1-888-VOTESMART for more specific information.

Sours: https://justfacts.votesmart.org/candidate/evaluations/110252/lee-zeldin

Approval rating zeldin lee

Lee Zeldin, the Republican candidate, has a modest lead in our poll.

Given expectations, our poll is a good result for Republicans. But remember: It’s just one poll, and we talked to only 502 people. Each candidate’s total could easily be five points different if we polled everyone in the district. And having a small sample is only one possible source of error.

Where we called:

Each dot shows one of the 27178 calls we made.

Vote choice: Dem. Rep. Don’t know Didn’t answer

Explore the 2016 election in detail with this interactive map.

About the race

  • Perry Gershon is a businessman. 29% favorable rating; 27% unfavorable; 44% don’t know

  • Lee Zeldin is the incumbent, first elected in 2014. 48% favorable rating; 35% unfavorable; 17% don’t know

  • The district, which includes the exceptionally wealthy Hamptons, many middle-class communities and some rural farm towns, twice voted narrowly for Barack Obama, but for Donald J. Trump by 12 points in 2016.

  • This has tended to be a battleground district, but Mr. Zeldin won his re-election two years ago by a decisive 16 percentage points.

  • Mr. Zeldin voted for repeal of the Affordable Care act, but against the tax overhaul, joining other 11 other Republican House members, most of them in high-tax districts in which many residents are losing local tax deductions. This vote cost him a fund-raiser with Paul Ryan, but he’s still outraising his rival.

  • Mr. Gershon spent 25 years in commercial real estate lending. He has said he became more politically active after seeing parallels between the rise of Donald Trump today and the rise of Hitler. Mr. Zeldin called that comparison “disgusting.” Both candidates are Jewish.

Previous election results:

2016 President+12 Trump
2012 President+1 Obama
2016 House+16 Rep.

It’s generally best to look at a single poll in the context of other polls:

Our turnout model

There’s a big question on top of the standard margin of error in a poll: Who is going to vote? It’s a particularly challenging question this year, since special elections have shown Democrats voting in large numbers.

To estimate the likely electorate, we combine what people say about how likely they are to vote with information about how often they have voted in the past. In previous races, this approach has been more accurate than simply taking people at their word. But there are many other ways to do it.

Our poll under different turnout scenarios
Who will vote?Est. turnoutOur poll result
The types of people who voted in 2014181k Zeldin +11
People who say they are almost certain to vote, and no one else239k Zeldin +3
Our estimate252k Zeldin +8
People whose voting history suggests they will vote, regardless of what they say256k Zeldin +8
People who say they will vote, adjusted for past levels of truthfulness271k Zeldin +8
The types of people who voted in 2016328k Zeldin +10
Every active registered voter465k Zeldin +10

Just because one candidate leads in all of these different turnout scenarios doesn’t mean much by itself. They don’t represent the full range of possible turnout scenarios, let alone the full range of possible election results.

The types of people we reached

Even if we got turnout exactly right, the margin of error wouldn’t capture all of the error in a poll. The simplest version assumes we have a perfect random sample of the voting population. We do not.

People who respond to surveys are almost always too old, too white, too educated and too politically engaged to accurately represent everyone.

How successful we were in reaching different kinds of voters
18 to 29333744 1 in 76 9% 10%
30 to 6414502304 1 in 48 61% 57%
65 and older4830153 1 in 32 30% 33%
Male9973243 1 in 41 48% 47%
Female12704259 1 in 49 52% 53%
White17433383 1 in 46 76% 76%
Nonwhite287861 1 in 47 12% 12%
Cell15077238 1 in 63 47%
Landline7600264 1 in 29 53%

Pollsters compensate by giving more weight to respondents from under-represented groups.

Here, we’re weighting by age, party registration, gender, likelihood of voting, race, education and region, mainly using data from voting records files compiled by L2, a nonpartisan voter file vendor.

But weighting works only if you weight by the right categories and you know what the composition of the electorate will be. In 2016, many pollsters didn’t weight by education and overestimated Hillary Clinton’s standing as a result.

Here are other common ways to weight a poll:

Our poll under different weighting schemes
Our poll result
Weight using census data instead of voting records, like most public polls Zeldin +6
Don’t weight by education, like many polls in 2016 Zeldin +6
Our estimate Zeldin +8
Don’t weight by party registration, like most public polls Zeldin +8

Just because one candidate leads in all of these different weighting scenarios doesn’t mean much by itself. They don’t represent the full range of possible weighting scenarios, let alone the full range of possible election results.

Undecided voters

About 10 percent of voters said that they were undecided or refused to tell us whom they would vote for. On questions about issues, these voters most closely resembled Democrats.

Issues and other questions

We're asking voters whether they support Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court and whether they believe the sexual assault accusations against him.

We're also asking voters about feminism and whether they think it's important to elect more women to public office.

Do you approve or disapprove of the job Donald Trump is doing as president?
ApproveDisapp.Don’t know
Voters n = 502 51% 43% 7%
Would you prefer Republicans to retain control of the House of Representatives or would you prefer Democrats to take control?
Reps. keep HouseDems. take HouseDon’t know
Voters n = 502 49% 43% 8%
Do you support or oppose Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the United States Supreme Court?
supportopposeDon’t know
Voters n = 502 53% 41% 6%
As you may know, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has been accused of committing sexual assault when he was a teenager. Would you say you believe the allegations, you do not believe the allegations, or you simply are unable to come to a conclusion?
BelieveDo not believeDon’t know
Voters n = 502 31% 41% 27%
Do you support electing more people who describe themselves as feminists?
supportopposeDon’t know
Voters n = 502 51% 31% 18%
Is it important to elect more women to public office?
agreedisagreeDon’t know
Voters n = 502 77% 13% 10%
As you think about your member of Congress, would you prefer your representative to support President Trump and his agenda, or to serve as a check on the president and his agenda?
SupportCheckDon’t know
Voters n = 502 46% 47% 6%

What different types of voters said

Voters nationwide are deeply divided along demographic lines. Our poll suggests divisions too. But don’t overinterpret these tables. Results among subgroups may not be representative or reliable. Be especially careful with groups with fewer than 100 respondents, shown here in stripes.

Gender
Dem.Rep.Und.
Female n = 259 / 53% of voters 48% 41% 12%
Male 243 / 47% 34% 59% 8%
Age
Dem.Rep.Und.
18 to 29 n = 37 / 8% of voters 56% 39% 5%
30 to 44 74 / 15% 44% 34% 22%
45 to 64 228 / 44% 38% 53% 9%
65 and older 162 / 33% 41% 53% 6%
Race
Dem.Rep.Und.
White n = 412 / 83% of voters 39% 51% 9%
Black 12 / 3% 66% 17% 17%
Hispanic 31 / 6% 59% 39% 2%
Asian 12 / 2% 43% 42% 15%
Other 10 / 2% 29% 71%
Race and education
Dem.Rep.Und.
Nonwhite n = 65 / 13% of voters 53% 40% 7%
White, college grad 214 / 34% 47% 44% 9%
White, not college grad 198 / 48% 34% 57% 10%
Education
Dem.Rep.Und.
H.S. Grad. or Less n = 85 / 25% of voters 33% 57% 10%
Some College Educ. 147 / 32% 38% 53% 9%
4-year College Grad. 121 / 21% 48% 42% 10%
Post-grad. 139 / 21% 50% 42% 8%
Party
Dem.Rep.Und.
Democrat n = 144 / 29% of voters 87% 5% 8%
Republican 158 / 33% 3% 90% 6%
Independent 165 / 32% 43% 45% 12%
Another party 22 / 4% 14% 83% 3%
Party registration
Dem.Rep.Und.
Democratic n = 167 / 33% of voters 76% 15% 10%
Republican 177 / 37% 18% 77% 5%
Other 158 / 30% 31% 54% 15%
Intention of voting
Dem.Rep.Und.
Almost certain n = 308 / 63% of voters 45% 47% 7%
Very likely 135 / 28% 35% 54% 11%
Somewhat likely 32 / 6% 34% 53% 13%
Not very likely 7 / 1% 21% 14% 65%
Not at all likely 16 / 2% 25% 39% 36%

Other districts where we’ve completed polls

California 48Orange CountySept. 4-6
Illinois 12Downstate IllinoisSept. 4-6
Illinois 6Chicago suburbsSept. 4-6
Kentucky 6Lexington areaSept. 6-8
Minnesota 3Minneapolis suburbsSept. 7-9
Minnesota 8Iron RangeSept. 6-9
West Virginia 3Coal CountrySept. 8-10
Virginia 7Richmond suburbsSept. 9-12
Texas 23South TexasSept. 10-11
Wisconsin 1Southeastern WisconsinSept. 11-13
Colorado 6Denver SuburbsSept. 12-14
Maine 2Upstate, Down East MaineSept. 12-14
Kansas 2Eastern KansasSept. 13-15
Florida 26South FloridaSept. 13-17
New Mexico 2Southern New MexicoSept. 13-18
Texas 7Houston and suburbsSept. 14-18
California 25Southern CaliforniaSept. 17-19
New Jersey 7Suburban New JerseySept. 17-21
Iowa 1Northeastern IowaSept. 18-20
California 49Southern CaliforniaSept. 18-23
Texas 32Suburban DallasSept. 19-24
Pennsylvania 7The Lehigh ValleySept. 21-25
Kansas 3Eastern Kansas suburbsSept. 20-23
California 45Southern CaliforniaSept. 21-25
New Jersey 3South, central New JerseySept. 22-26
Nebraska 2Omaha areaSept. 23-26
Washington 8Seattle suburbs and beyondSept. 24-26
Michigan 8Lansing, Detroit suburbsSept. 28-Oct. 3
Virginia 2Coastal VirginiaSept. 26-Oct. 1
Arizona 2Southeastern ArizonaSept. 26-Oct. 1
Iowa 3Southwest IowaSept. 27-30
Ohio 1Southwestern OhioSept. 27-Oct. 1
Minnesota 2Minneapolis suburbs, southern Minn.Sept. 29-Oct. 2
Michigan 11Detroit suburbsOct. 1-6
Illinois 14Chicago exurbsOct. 3-8
North Carolina 9Charlotte suburbs, southern N.C.Oct. 1-5
New York 1Eastern Long IslandOct. 4-8
Texas 31Central Texas, Round RockOct. 1-5
North Carolina 13Piedmont TriadOct. 3-8
Pennsylvania 16Northwestern Pa.Oct. 5-8
Texas SenateThe Lone Star StateOct. 8-11
Tennessee SenateThe Volunteer StateOct. 8-11
Nevada SenateThe Silver StateOct. 8-10
Pennsylvania 1Delaware ValleyOct. 11-14
Arizona 6Northeastern Phoenix suburbsOct. 11-15
Minnesota 8Iron RangeOct. 11-14
Virginia 10Northern VirginiaOct. 11-15
Colorado 6Denver SuburbsOct. 13-17
Washington 3Southwest WashingtonOct. 14-19
Texas 23South TexasOct. 13-18
West Virginia 3Coal CountryOct. 14-18
Kansas 3Eastern Kansas suburbsOct. 14-17
Arizona SenateThe Grand Canyon StateOct. 15-19
Florida 27South FloridaOct. 15-19
Maine 2Upstate, Down East MaineOct. 15-18
New Jersey 11Northern New Jersey suburbs.Oct. 13-17
Pennsylvania 8Wyoming ValleyOct. 16-19
Florida 15Tampa ExurbsOct. 16-19
Virginia 5Central, southern VirginiaOct. 16-22
California 39East of Los AngelesOct. 18-23
Illinois 12Downstate IllinoisOct. 18-22
Virginia 2Coastal VirginiaOct. 18-22
California 49Southern CaliforniaOct. 19-24
Florida 26South FloridaOct. 19-24
Texas 7Houston and suburbsOct. 19-25
Illinois 13Downstate IllinoisOct. 21-25
New Mexico 2Southern New MexicoOct. 19-23
Illinois 6Chicago suburbsOct. 20-26
Ohio 1Southwestern OhioOct. 20-24
California 10Central Valley farm beltOct. 21-25
New Jersey 3South, central New JerseyOct. 21-25
Pennsylvania 10South, central PennsylvaniaOct. 23-26
New York 11Staten Island, southern BrooklynOct. 23-27
Florida SenateThe Sunshine StateOct. 23-27
Florida GovernorThe Sunshine StateOct. 23-27
Utah 4South of Salt Lake CityOct. 24-26
New York 27Western New YorkOct. 24-29
Iowa 3Southwest IowaOct. 25-27
California 25Southern CaliforniaOct. 25-28
California 45Southern CaliforniaOct. 26-Nov. 1
Pennsylvania 1Delaware ValleyOct. 26-29
North Carolina 9Charlotte suburbs, southern N.C.Oct. 26-30
Kansas 2Eastern KansasOct. 27-30
New Jersey 7Suburban New JerseyOct. 28-31
Georgia 6Northern Atlanta suburbsOct. 28-Nov. 4
Iowa 1Northeastern IowaOct. 28-31
Texas 32Suburban DallasOct. 29-Nov. 4
California 48Orange CountyOct. 29-Nov. 4
Virginia 7Richmond suburbsOct. 30-Nov. 4
Illinois 14Chicago exurbsOct. 31-Nov. 4
Washington 8Seattle suburbs and beyondOct. 30-Nov. 4
Iowa 4Northwestern IowaOct. 31-Nov. 4
Michigan 8Lansing, Detroit suburbsOct. 31-Nov. 4
Kentucky 6Lexington areaNov. 1-4
New York 19Catskills, Hudson ValleyNov. 1-4
New York 22Central New YorkNov. 1-4
Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/upshot/elections-poll-ny01-1.html
Congressman Lee Zeldin on Fox News' \

Tracking Congress In The Age Of Trump

Dec. 28, 2020Overriding President Trump’s veto of the National Defense Authorization Act (322-87)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

25.2%

Plus-minus

+74.8Dec. 28, 2020Increasing coronavirus-related stimulus payments to $2,000 from $600 (275-134)

Trump Position

support

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

57.8%

Plus-minus

+42.2Dec. 21, 2020Pandemic aid bill (359-53)

Trump Position

support

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

85.3%

Plus-minus

+14.7Dec. 8, 2020The National Defense Authorization Act (335-78)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

18.0%

Plus-minus

-18.0Nov. 20, 2020Expanding the national apprenticeship system (246-140)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Not voting

Agree with Trump?

——

Likelihood of agreement

54.2%

Plus-minus

——Sept. 24, 2020Providing money for clean-energy research and changing rules for energy efficiency (220-185)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

65.9%

Plus-minus

+34.1Sept. 16, 2020Allowing lawsuits against discrimination in education programs regardless of officials’ intent (232-188)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.3%

Plus-minus

+19.7Aug. 22, 2020Providing additional money to the U.S. Postal Service and prohibiting the agency from making certain changes (257-150)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

52.3%

Plus-minus

+47.7July 21, 2020The National Defense Authorization Act (295-125)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

32.0%

Plus-minus

+68.0July 1, 2020$1.5 trillion infrastructure bill (233-188)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

85.2%

Plus-minus

+14.8June 29, 2020Repeal of a rule changing Community Reinvestment Act standards (230-179)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.6%

Plus-minus

+19.4June 29, 2020Extending housing assistance in response to the coronavirus pandemic (232-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.7%

Plus-minus

+19.3June 29, 2020Changing regulations on consumer credit reporting (234-179)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

82.4%

Plus-minus

+17.6June 29, 2020Expanding the Affordable Care Act (234-179)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

86.3%

Plus-minus

+13.7June 26, 2020Making the District of Columbia a state (232-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

86.1%

Plus-minus

+13.9June 25, 2020Combating brutality and racial discrimination by police (236-181)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

79.9%

Plus-minus

+20.1May 15, 2020$3 trillion package in response to the coronavirus pandemic (208-199)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

81.1%

Plus-minus

+18.9March 14, 2020Providing assistance to people affected by the coronavirus (363-40)

Trump Position

support

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

90.3%

Plus-minus

+9.7March 11, 2020Restricting President Trump from taking military action against Iran without congressional approval (227-186)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

73.3%

Plus-minus

+26.7March 5, 2020Giving additional rights to Transportation Security Administration employees (230-171)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

64.4%

Plus-minus

-64.4Feb. 28, 2020Banning flavored tobacco products (213-195)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

74.7%

Plus-minus

+25.3Feb. 7, 2020Providing disaster aid for Puerto Rico (237-161)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

60.7%

Plus-minus

+39.3Feb. 6, 2020Making changes to labor laws (224-194)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.6%

Plus-minus

+19.4Jan. 29, 2020Changing regulations on credit reporting (221-189)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

82.3%

Plus-minus

+17.7Jan. 16, 2020Reversing a Department of Education regulation on student loans (231-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

75.8%

Plus-minus

+24.2Jan. 15, 2020Changing the standards for demonstrating age discrimination (261-155)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

47.9%

Plus-minus

+52.1Jan. 10, 2020Requiring the Environmental Protection Agency to issue regulations regarding certain chemicals (247-159)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

56.3%

Plus-minus

-56.3Jan. 9, 2020Restricting President Trump from taking military action against Iran without congressional approval (224-194)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

76.5%

Plus-minus

+23.5Dec. 19, 2019United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement (385-41)

Trump Position

support

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

96.6%

Plus-minus

+3.4Dec. 19, 2019Repealing a cap on state and local tax deductions (218-206)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

77.5%

Plus-minus

+22.5Dec. 18, 2019Impeaching President Trump on a charge of obstruction of Congress (229-198)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

88.0%

Plus-minus

+12.0Dec. 18, 2019Impeaching President Trump on a charge of abuse of power (230-197)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

86.9%

Plus-minus

+13.1Dec. 12, 2019Allowing the federal government to negotiate lower prescription drug prices (230-192)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.4%

Plus-minus

+19.6Dec. 6, 2019Restoring parts of the Voting Rights Act (228-187)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

81.1%

Plus-minus

+18.9Nov. 21, 2019Requiring health care and social service employers to have plans for preventing workplace violence (251-158)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

48.9%

Plus-minus

-48.9Nov. 15, 2019Reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank (235-184)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

63.1%

Plus-minus

+36.9Oct. 31, 2019Preserving nearly 400,000 acres of land in Colorado (227-182)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

74.9%

Plus-minus

+25.1Oct. 31, 2019Establishing the procedures for an impeachment inquiry (232-196)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

87.1%

Plus-minus

+12.9Oct. 30, 2019Permanently banning new uranium mines near the Grand Canyon (236-185)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

69.7%

Plus-minus

+30.3Oct. 23, 2019Requiring campaigns to report offers of assistance from foreign governments (227-181)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

87.1%

Plus-minus

+12.9Oct. 17, 2019Requiring the Securities and Exchange Commission to study investor disclosures (229-186)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.5%

Plus-minus

+19.5Oct. 16, 2019Opposing President Trump’s withdrawal of troops from Syria (354-60)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

12.3%

Plus-minus

-12.3Sept. 27, 2019Overturning President Trump’s emergency declaration for border wall funding (236-174)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

64.9%

Plus-minus

+35.1Sept. 20, 2019Banning companies from requiring private arbitration to resolve disputes (225-186)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

77.4%

Plus-minus

+22.6Sept. 11, 2019Banning drilling off the Atlantic and Pacific coasts (238-189)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

68.2%

Plus-minus

-68.2Sept. 11, 2019Banning drilling in the eastern Gulf of Mexico (248-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

60.7%

Plus-minus

+39.3July 25, 2019Two-year budget bill (284-149)

Trump Position

support

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

56.8%

Plus-minus

-56.8July 24, 2019Establishing humanitarian standards for people in the custody of Customs and Border Protection (233-195)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.1%

Plus-minus

+19.9July 18, 2019Raising the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour (231-199)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

82.7%

Plus-minus

+17.3July 17, 2019Holding the attorney general and secretary of commerce in contempt of Congress (230-198)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

83.6%

Plus-minus

+16.4July 17, 2019Blocking the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia (237-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

70.1%

Plus-minus

+29.9July 17, 2019Blocking the sale of arms to the United Arab Emirates (238-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

70.1%

Plus-minus

+29.9July 17, 2019Blocking the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia (238-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

70.1%

Plus-minus

+29.9July 17, 2019Motion to table articles of impeachment against President Trump (332-95)

Trump Position

support

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

97.5%

Plus-minus

+2.5July 16, 2019Condeming President Trump’s comments about four congresswomen as racist (240-187)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

77.7%

Plus-minus

+22.3July 12, 2019National Defense Authorization Act (220-197)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

69.6%

Plus-minus

+30.4June 26, 2019Funding the Treasury Department, the IRS, the Executive Office of the President and other agencies (224-196)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

83.0%

Plus-minus

+17.0June 25, 2019Providing humanitarian aid for the U.S.-Mexico border (230-195)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

70.5%

Plus-minus

+29.5June 25, 2019Funding the Department of Commerce, the Department of Justice and several other parts of the government (227-194)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

82.0%

Plus-minus

+18.0June 19, 2019Funding much of the federal government, including the departments of Defense, Labor, Education, State, and Health and Human Services (226-203)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

73.4%

Plus-minus

+26.6June 4, 2019Creating a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children (237-187)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

74.9%

Plus-minus

+25.1May 22, 2019Reversing changes to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (231-191)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

80.6%

Plus-minus

+19.4May 16, 2019Lowering prescription drug costs and reversing changes to the Affordable Care Act (234-183)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

78.6%

Plus-minus

+21.4May 15, 2019Reaffirming the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe reservation in Massachusetts (275-146)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

43.3%

Plus-minus

+56.7May 10, 2019Providing disaster relief money, including additional aid for Puerto Rico (257-150)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

47.2%

Plus-minus

+52.8May 9, 2019Blocking the Trump administration from granting Affordable Care Act waivers to states (230-183)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

76.5%

Plus-minus

+23.5May 2, 2019Blocking President Trump from withdrawing from the Paris agreement on climate change (231-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

79.0%

Plus-minus

+21.0April 10, 2019Restoring net neutrality regulations (232-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

78.8%

Plus-minus

+21.2April 4, 2019Ending U.S. military assistance to Saudi-led forces in the war in Yemen (247-175)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

57.9%

Plus-minus

+42.1April 3, 2019Condemning the Trump administration for calling on courts to invalidate the Affordable Care Act (240-186)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

78.7%

Plus-minus

+21.3March 28, 2019Opposing a ban on openly transgender people serving in the military (238-185)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

75.2%

Plus-minus

+24.8March 26, 2019Overriding President Trump’s veto of a bill that overturned his emergency declaration for border wall funding (248-181)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

64.4%

Plus-minus

+35.6March 8, 2019Updating ethics rules, expanding voting rights and requiring presidential candidates to disclose tax returns (234-193)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

81.3%

Plus-minus

+18.7Feb. 28, 2019Giving law enforcement agencies more time to conduct background checks for gun sales (228-198)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

92.5%

Plus-minus

+7.5Feb. 27, 2019Requiring background checks for all firearm sales (240-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

84.4%

Plus-minus

+15.6Feb. 26, 2019Overturning President Trump’s emergency declaration for border wall funding (245-182)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

64.4%

Plus-minus

+35.6Feb. 13, 2019Ending U.S. military assistance to Saudi-led forces in the war in Yemen (248-177)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

57.2%

Plus-minus

+42.8Jan. 24, 2019Funding the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 28, without money for a border wall (231-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

72.3%

Plus-minus

+27.7Jan. 23, 2019Funding most of the federal government through Sept. 30, without money for a border wall (234-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

68.1%

Plus-minus

+31.9Jan. 23, 2019Funding the federal government through Feb. 28, without money for a border wall (229-184)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

72.1%

Plus-minus

+27.9Jan. 17, 2019Disapproving of the Trump administration’s plan to lift sanctions on three Russian companies (362-53)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

Yes

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

10.4%

Plus-minus

-10.4Jan. 16, 2019Providing disaster relief money and funding the government through Feb. 8, without money for a border wall (237-187)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

77.0%

Plus-minus

+23.0Jan. 15, 2019Funding the federal government through Feb. 1, without money for a border wall (237-187)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

76.9%

Plus-minus

+23.1Jan. 11, 2019Funding the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency and related agencies (240-179)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

71.4%

Plus-minus

+28.6Jan. 10, 2019Funding the Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration and related agencies (243-183)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

71.7%

Plus-minus

+28.3Jan. 10, 2019Funding the Department of Transportation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development and related agencies (244-180)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

69.3%

Plus-minus

+30.7Jan. 9, 2019Funding the Treasury Department, the Internal Revenue Service and several other government agencies (240-188)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

74.0%

Plus-minus

+26.0Jan. 3, 2019Funding most of the federal agencies affected by the government shutdown (241-190)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

75.8%

Plus-minus

+24.2Jan. 3, 2019Providing short-term funding for the Department of Homeland Security, without money for a border wall (239-192)

Trump Position

oppose

Zeldin Vote

No

Agree with Trump?

Likelihood of agreement

78.2%

Plus-minus

+21.8
Sours: https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/congress-trump-score/lee-zeldin/

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Governors brace for 2022 after year in pandemic spotlight

Governors across the country are bracing for contentious reelection bids after over a year in the national spotlight leading the response to the coronavirus pandemic in their respective states.

Thirty-six governor’s mansions will be up for grabs in 2022, with 29 governors running for reelection. Those executives running for another term will almost certainly have to defend their pandemic responses — and often from both sides.

In Florida, state Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried and Rep. Charlie CristCharles (Charlie) Joseph CristDeSantis tops Crist, Fried in poll of Florida governor raceBudowsky: Newsom soars while Trump, Abbott, DeSantis ratings lagDemocrats face bleak outlook in FloridaMORE, the two main Democratic gubernatorial candidates, have hammered Gov. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisThe Biden-Harris train wreck may have its savior: 2024 GOP nominee Donald TrumpThe perfect Democratic running mate for DeSantis?Trump heads to Iowa as 2024 chatter growsMORE (R) over his laid-back response as coronavirus cases rise, and in Texas, Gov. Greg AbbottGreg AbbottAbbott bans vaccine mandates from any 'entity in Texas'West says COVID-19 hospitalization made him 'more dedicated' to fight against vaccine mandatesTexas gubernatorial candidate Allen West says he has coronavirus-related pneumonia MORE’s (R) own primary opponents have said his early pandemic response was too stringent. While both Abbott and DeSantis are said to be contemplating presidential bids in 2024, they must first be reelected to their current posts in 2022.

In Michigan, the multiple Republicans challenging Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerWhitmer vetoes bill on bird feeding over deer fearsEquilibrium/Sustainability — Coloradan cattle test 'Google Maps for cows' Biden says infrastructure bills must pass at 'inflection point' for USMORE (D) argue that her pandemic response has not only been too stringent, but hypocritical.

Meanwhile in New York, Republicans say they are gearing up to target recently sworn Gov. Kathy HochulKathy HochulNo charges for passenger in LaGuardia emergency landingFour Democratic governors agree to share gun crime data in effort to thwart violenceWatchdog: De Blasio misused security detail for personal benefit MORE (D), tying her to her scandal-ridden predecessor, former Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoDe Blasio privately says he plans to run for New York governor: reportNY Democratic Party chair endorses Hochul bid for governorAre the cases against R. Kelly, Larry Nassar and Prince Andrew 'wins' for #MeToo?MORE (D).

All four incumbents are relatively firm in their standings. The nonpartisan Cook Political Report rates Hochul’s and Whitmer’s races as “likely Democratic” and “lean Democratic” respectively, while Abbott’s and DeSantis’s races are also respectively “likely” and “lean” Republican.

To be sure, other issues, like the abortion fight in Texas or the state of the economy, will play a role in the races. But with no end in sight for the pandemic, governors facing reelection will almost certainly be judged at the ballot box for their coronavirus responses.

“It’s definitely going to be an important issue. Some of that depends on how the economy is doing,” said Michigan-based Democratic consultant Adrian Hemond.

“She’s an incumbent governor, so if the economy is doing well, it’s a huge advantage,” he continued, referring to Whitmer. “If it’s not, that’s all anyone’s going to talk about.”

Democrats say governors, like Whitmer, are at an advantage because they get to preside over their state’s distribution of the funds from President BidenJoe BidenGruden out as Raiders coach after further emails reveal homophobic, sexist commentsAbbott bans vaccine mandates from any 'entity in Texas'Jill Biden to campaign with McAuliffe on FridayMORE’s American Rescue Plan.

A chorus of Republicans have already jumped into their party’s primary to challenge Whitmer in the general election. Retired Detroit police officer James Craig launched his campaign on Tuesday, joining nine other Republicans, including right-wing media figure Tudor Dixon.

An EPIC-MRA poll released last month showed Whitmer narrowly leading Craig 45 percent to 44 percent in a hypothetical match-up.

In addition to the economy, GOP candidates and groups have already began swiping at Whitmer for her pandemic response, calling it an example of hypocrisy.

“She was kind of berating people and lecturing them and pointing her fingers, scolding them, while she was doing the exact same thing,” said Joanna Rodriguez, deputy communications director at the Republican Governors Association (RGA).

The RGA announced in May it would spend more than $500,000 on a TV ad effort to target Whitmer ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. The ad released in May specifically criticized Whitmer for flying to Florida to visit her father during the coronavirus pandemic when she closed nursing homes in her own state. The trip took place from March 12 to March 15. Whitmer eased restrictions on nursing home visitations on March 2.

Democrats maintain that the strategy of hitting Whitmer on the issue of hypocrisy likely won’t impact voters in their day-to-day lives.

“It doesn’t relate to their everyday concerns,” said David Turner, a spokesperson for the Democratic Governors Association. “They want a leader who is going to be taking the pandemic seriously, who’s going to be balancing the various parts of society to make sure that they work to keep people safe and healthy.”

In Florida and in Texas, DeSantis and Abbott have both faced criticism for their handling of the pandemic from the left. Both governors have worked to appeal to their conservative bases through pushing back on localities instituting vaccine and mask mandates, but Abbott’s primary opponents have criticized him for instituting a statewide mask mandate last year.

Abbott faces primary challenges from former state GOP Chairman Allen West, former state Sen. Don Huffines (R) and conservative political commentator Chad Prather.

But Abbott’s supporters are brushing off the primary challenges, citing his approval ratings among Republicans in the state and his endorsement from former President TrumpDonald TrumpPennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro enters governor's raceGOP lawmakers introduce measure in support of Columbus DayBannon's subpoena snub sets up big decision for Biden DOJMORE.

“There is no one that thinks that Gov. Abbott is not going to be the Republican nominee,” Rodriguez said. “At this point, there’s no probable path for someone to challenge Gov. Abbott, realistically.”

In Florida, the Democratic primary to challenge DeSantis in the general election will be the most-watched gubernatorial primary. Crist and Fried have hit DeSantis over his lax handling of the pandemic and pushback against localities looking to institute mandates as the delta variant has surged in the state.

“It’s not just that DeSantis is saying we’re not going to have a statewide mandate and that localities are free to choose,” Turner said. “He’s penalizing people for trying to do the right thing in the pandemic, and I think voters are 100 percent going to hold that against him in a general election.”

DeSantis’s approval rating fell from 54 percent in June to 48 percent in the latest polling from Morning Consult. But the governor still stands strong with his base, holding an 83 percent approval rating from Republicans.

The governor’s allies argue that DeSantis’s approach to keeping the economy open and touting monoclonal antibody treatment against the virus will help him with voters.

“That treatment keeps people out of the hospital. It keeps people from getting seriously sick,” Rodriguez said. “If ultimately people are going to make the decision to continue to live their lives or choose not to get vaccinated and they do end up getting sick, making sure that treatment is available and accessible across the state equally is something he’s made an incredible priority.”

In New York, Hochul is set to be one of the most unique test cases in next year’s midterms, having been sworn-in just last month. Hochul took office after a damning report from Attorney General Letitia James (D) found that Cuomo sexually harassed and bullied numerous women during his time as governor. Additionally, Cuomo is still under investigation for nursing home deaths in New York during the pandemic.

A number of Republicans have launched their campaigns for governor in the largely blue state, including Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinNY Democratic Party chair endorses Hochul bid for governorNY governor seeking to raise million ahead of next year's primary The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats return to disappointment on immigrationMORE, who said in July he brought in $4 million in the first three months of the campaign.

While Hochul was not governor during the beginning of the pandemic, Republicans are eager to tie her to Cuomo.

“While the bucks may have stopped with Cuomo, Cuomo was not the only person responsible for the decisions that were made,” Rodriguez said. “She could have very easily spoken out and criticized him if she had an objection and she chose not to.”

But Democrats point to Hochul’s different leadership style than Cuomo and her distance from him during his administration.

“It’s very, very clear that she did not have the traditional president-vice president shared decision making role together,” said New York-based Democratic strategist Jon Reinish.

“She was not a policy-making deciding figure at the table when it came to COVID response, both the good and the bad,” he added.

Democrats also said they were confident they would easily be able to defend New York, given its status as a reliably blue state.

“If the Republicans want to go chasing after the governorship of New York, we welcome that and encourage them to spend their money there,” Turner said.

Sours: https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/572296-governors-brace-for-2022-after-year-in-pandemic-spotlight


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