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Where I can Buy Coal: Various Stores Around Me That Has it

Where I can Buy Coal: Various Stores Around Me That Has it.

Where I can Buy Coal: Coal is a fossil fuel usually burned to produce electricity, but that’s not what it is used for, it has domestic uses too — most usually heating and blacksmithing. Coal is made under high heat and pressure underneath the Earth’s surface. The best and highest grade coal, anthracite, has spent the most time underneath exposed to pressure and heat.

Where I can Buy Coal: Various Stores Around Me That Has it

Lower-grade coals, like bituminous coal, have spent little less time forming underground. The higher the grade of the coal, the harder and purer the coal.

In this article, we offer you an introduction to the most commonly used types of coal and how they are. Ande applied. If perhaps you’re wondering, “Where to buy coal near me?” we’ve made the list for you.

It’s a list of hardware stores, blacksmith stores, and coal producers or suppliers that people can buy from,  with the firms’ rates and availability, so that you can select a supplier that’s suitable for you.

Choosing the Right Type of Coal

There are many kinds of coal, and there are different sellers that sell them. The first step when shopping for coal is to know what type you need. Here are the most common kind of coal and what they’re using.

Anthracite

Anthracite is the hardest, high-grade coal that generates a hot blue flame when it is burned. The majority of anthracite in the U.S. is gotten from Pennsylvania. It was heavily produced and mined in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Anthracite has become more difficult to mine because the remaining reserves are deeper and deeper underground.

Anthracite is ideal for generating heat in coal-burning furnaces in homes or small businesses. Not only does anthracite burn hotter than other coals, but it also burns more slowly and is the most efficient heat producer relative to its weight. Anthracite is the cleanest burning coal, and when used properly in modern furnaces will require little cleaning.

Anthracite comes in several sizes, as shown below. The larger the pieces of coal, the higher the price. Chestnut and Pea’s sizes are used in hand-fired furnaces while the smaller Rice and Buckwheat sizes are used in automatic stoker furnaces. Be sure to check the instructions on your stove to confirm which size is appropriate.

Bituminous

Bituminous, or “soft” coal, as it is named because it comprises bitumen, a tar-like substance. Bituminous coal is reducing quality and much easier to mine than anthracite. Normally, it is burned to create electricity and run trains.

Bituminous coal can create extreme soot and smoke when it is burned, so it’s not best for heating, particularly in coal or wood-burning stoves in the home.

It is coal that is also used to create coke and to make iron and steel. Anthracite is not mostly used for blacksmithing this is because distinct from bituminous coal; anthracite produces a little amount of coke that has a tendency to blow up and out of the fire.

Because of this, bituminous coal is suitable for blacksmithing. Blacksmith coal used in forges is high-grade bituminous coal, though some forges may use coke or charcoal.

Lignite

Lignite, or “brown coal,” is the lowermost quality coal among the category of coal. Geologically, it is the youngest category of coal. As was pointed out by the Lignite Energy Council, about 79 percent of lignite coal is used to create electricity and 13.5% is used to produce synthetic natural gas, while 7.5% is used to make fertilizer products (plus anhydrous ammonia and ammonium sulfate).

Lignite produces little heat compared to its weight and compared to other coals, so it is typically used to produce power in plants near the mine.

Because only a little percentage is utilized domestically (normally for heating or fertilizer), lignite is not listed in our list of coal suppliers and dealers.

Coal slag

Coal slag is the byproduct of coal that is burned to generate power. It can be made into blasting abrasives that are finer and safer than silica sand (which is another most use blasting abrasive).

People who produce this material clean the slag and sort it by size — medium, fine, and additional ally fine — before selling to people.

Abrasive blasting includes the use of high pressure to boost abrasive material, such as coal slag, on a surface either to smooth a rough ground, roughen a smooth surface, or to even clean the surface.

Places That Sell Coal

You buy coal, it is either from local hardware or supply stores, blacksmithing stores, or in some situations, directly from the producer. Coal at hardware stores is mostly sold in 40- or 50-pound bags.

Hardware stores are Grade A if you just want a bag or two. Blacksmithing stores likewise carry coal, however, they normally won’t sell coal suitable for heating.

Dealers are best if you want to purchase them in bulk. Dealers mostly sell by the skid, or pallet, which has about 50 bags and equals one ton.

The list below covers stores or dealers that will transport regionally or nationally, or have a huge number of stores. Ensure to make an inquiry from your local hardware store, blacksmith supplier, or local mine to match cost and delivery options.

Hardware Stores (Best for Small Quantities)

A local hardware store is the finest option for buying coal in a much smaller amount suitable for individual domestic use.

There may be much smaller regional stores closest to you that we didn’t include in our list, so you can inquire from your town’s hardware store if you’re seeking a local option.

Hardware stores mostly carry both anthracite and bituminous coal (which is suitable for blacksmithing).

1. Aubuchon Hardware

2. Lehman’s

  • Products: Aubuchon sells anthracite by the pallet (2,400 lbs)
  • Location: Kidron and Hope, OH.
  • Shipping: Lehman’s will ship pallets of anthracite by freight only. Prices for shipping range from $200 – $700, depending on the buyer’s location. The coal ships from Ohio. Call (800) 438-5346 for a quote.

3. Tractor Supply Co.

  • Products: Tractor Supply Co. sells anthracite and blasting abrasives —
    • Anthracite: Premium Rice Coal (40 lb bag); Premium Nut Coal (40 lb bag)
    • Blasting Abrasives: Black Diamond Medium Blasting Abrasives (50 lb bag); Black Diamond Fine Blasting Abrasives (50 lb bag)
  • Location: Tractor Supply Co. has stores in all 50 states. Find your nearest Tractor Supply Co.
  • Shipping: Coal is available for in-store pickup only. Tractor Supply Co. does not ship coal.

Blacksmith Supply Stores (Best for Bituminous Coal)

Blacksmith stores usually have only a few locations, but usually ship nationwide for affordable, flat rates. They generally only carry bituminous coal best suited for smithing, and not anthracite which is best for heating.

4. Blacksmith Depot

  • Products: Blacksmithing Coal (Pea Size) (50 lb bag); and Blacksmithing Coke (45 lb bag). Discounts are available for large orders.
  • Location: Chandler, NC.
  • Shipping: Blacksmith Depot ships nationwide from Chandler, NC. Shipping cost varies depending on location and ranges from around $30 to nearby locations to over $60 on the west coast. Shipping quotes are available at checkout.

5. Centaur Forge

6. Pieh Tool Co.

  • Products: Pieh sells coal and coke for smithing. Bituminous coal is available in 50 lb bags and coke is available in 50 lb bags. Discounts are available for purchases of five bags or more.
  • Location: Camp Verde and Cave Creek, AZ.
  • Shipping: Pieh Tool Co. ships nationwide from Arizona. Pieh advises that shipping can cost more than the product itself and that customers should call for a quote if concerned. In addition, Pieh recommends purchasing a minimum of 200 lbs and having it shipped by motor freight to minimize shipping costs.

Coal Mining Companies and Other Suppliers (Best for Bulk)

Coal mining companies mine anthracite, bituminous coal, and/or lignite. These companies often provide delivery, at least in their region, but they typically only deliver large quantities to individuals. Shipping rates are available upon inquiry.

7. Blaschak Coal Corporation

  • Products: Blaschak sells anthracite in 40 lb bags or by the ton.
  • Location: Mahanoy City, PA. The Blaschak website has a dealer locator to inquire about nearby dealers.
  • Shipping: Many Blaschak dealers deliver door-to-door. Use Blaschak’s dealer locator to find the nearest one and inquire about specific details.

8. Center Coal Co.

  • Products: Center Coal produces lignite.
    • At the Center, ND location: Treated stoker coal by the ton and lump coal by the ton.
    • At the Dickinson, ND location: Treated stoker coal by the ton and lump coal by the ton.
  • Location: Center and Dickinson, ND.
  • Shipping: Center Coal recommends that customers inquire about delivery details.Center Coal’s trucks routinely travel to North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota, and the company will consider shipping elsewhere as well.

9. Penn Keystone Coal Co.

  • Products: Penn Keystone will only be appropriate for individuals looking to buy in large quantities. Penn can supply approximately 22-26 ton loads of anthracite or bituminous coal, but cannot supply smaller quantities.
    • Anthracite coal is available in Stove, Nut, Pea, Buckwheat No 1, Rice, Barley, Buckwheat No. 4, and Buckwheat No. 5 sizes.
    • Bituminous coal Different type available include Kentucky Stoker (low ash/sulfur), Pocahontas #3 Pea & Nut from West Virginia, Screened Pittsburgh seam 3×1 or stoker, Washed Pittsburgh Stoker (1 1/2 x 1/4″), Washed Pittsburgh 2 x 5″ Nut, and Pittsburgh Lump (5″+).
  • Location: Claysburg, PA.
  • Shipping: Penn Keystone can ship to almost anywhere in the U.S. and Canada. Inquire about delivery options on the Penn Keystone website.

10. Reading Anthracite Company

  • Location: Reading is located in Pottsville, PA. Reading has a directory of dealers located in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Missouri, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. Use the directory, or call (570) 622-5150 or (800) 654-7792 for details about the dealer nearest you.
  • Shipping: Check with the nearest dealer for information on shipping.
  • Products: Reading sells anthracite for resident heating by the bag or in bulk.

Read Also:

In Summary

You can buy coal at local hardware stores, blacksmith stores, and directly from miners or suppliers. remember h0wever of the type and size of coal you need, and ensure you’re getting the appropriate kind.

If you’re buying coal for household use, hardware stores will be the best bet — they sell in the smallest quantities. For those who need a huge amount of coal, a ton or more, miners or dealers will be the best option.

Outside our list of where to buy coal, Ensure to check your local hardware or supply store for coal, particularly if looking to buy in a small amount. Though coal may not be as common as it once was, anthracite is still the best bet for heating homes and small businesses. Bituminous coal is still used for blacksmithing projects.

Though those staying in the country’s northeast region have more options for purchasing anthracite due to Pennsylvania’s huge deposits of this type of coal, anthracite can be purchased nationwide. Bituminous coal for blacksmithing is willingly available countrywide from blacksmith supply stores.

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For The Few Who Heat Homes With Coal, It's Still King

John Ord of Susquehanna, Pa., loads 40-pound bags of anthracite coal into his car. He's among the fewer than 130,000 households left in the United States that burn coal to heat their homes. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

John Ord of Susquehanna, Pa., loads 40-pound bags of anthracite coal into his car. He's among the fewer than 130,000 households left in the United States that burn coal to heat their homes.

Jeff Brady/NPR

Every few weeks, John Ord does something unusual for most people living in 2019 — he stops by a local hardware store in rural northeastern Pennsylvania to buy coal to heat his home.

He recently spent about $56 to buy 400 pounds of coal. That will keep his 2,400-square-foot house a toasty 70 to 72 degrees for a couple of weeks.

"This is the whole glamorous part, right here," says Ord, as he loads 40-pound bags of Pennsylvania anthracite coal into the back of his white station wagon.

When he gets home, Ord lugs the coal down to his basement, where he rips open a bag, lifts it chest high and loads it into a hopper on the back of his coal-burning stove.

It's a lot more work than most Americans with gas or electric heat go through to keep their homes warm. They can just set a thermostat and forget it. But Ord says this is actually less work than the wood stove he replaced last fall.

Ord loads a hopper on the back of his coal-burning stove. He says 400 pounds of coal will keep his 2,400-square-foot house between 70 and 72 degrees for a couple of weeks in the winter. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Ord loads a hopper on the back of his coal-burning stove. He says 400 pounds of coal will keep his 2,400-square-foot house between 70 and 72 degrees for a couple of weeks in the winter.

Jeff Brady/NPR

"Between cutting it [wood], stacking it, letting it season, moving it into the space where you need to access it and then loading the stove," Ord says, wood requires a lot more handling.

Ord's coal-burning stove burns 24 hours a day when it's cold. He likes the constant heat it gives off and says it's cheaper than his other options — oil and electric.

While most power plants around the United States burn bituminous coal, northeastern Pennsylvania is very proud of its anthracite coal, which is shinier and harder than you might expect. Ord says it burns cleaner too.

Anthracite coal is mined in northeastern Pennsylvania. About 63,000 households in the state burn coal for heat. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Anthracite coal is mined in northeastern Pennsylvania. About 63,000 households in the state burn coal for heat.

Jeff Brady/NPR

To demonstrate this, he goes outside and points up to a white chimney. "No smoke at all. There's no smell to it," says Ord.

But burning anthracite coal does emit more carbon dioxide per unit of heat than just about any other fuel, according to the Energy Information Administration. That makes it a contributor to climate change.

Anthracite backers point out that it has less sulfur than bituminous coal, but environmentalists say cleaner does not mean clean.

"It still emits quite a bit of dangerous sulfur dioxide, as well as heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, and mercury," says Tom Schuster with the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal campaign. He says anyone concerned about their contribution to climate change should avoid burning coal for heat.

Those in the anthracite coal business counter that the industry is so small that it's not a big contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

"If you want to look at the major CO2 producers in the world, it's not us," says Matt Atkinson, co-owner of Leisure Line Stove Company in Berwick, Pa. "And even if we quadrupled our current sales, it still wouldn't be a problem."

Seeking a new generation of customers

There was a time when coal was king in the home-heating business. In 1940, more than half of U.S. homes burned coal, according to the Census Bureau. It was a big business and such a part of the culture that coal company ads were heard regularly on the radio.

Listen to a 1953 Blue Coal radio advertisement here:

(Credit: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission/Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum)

After decades of decline, fewer than 130,000 households use coal for heat today. Half of them are in Pennsylvania, and the state's coal industry wants to boost that. It has a plan to attract more customers.

Atkinson is among those leading the campaign. He bought Leisure Line with a business partner in 2009 and says he got into the coal stove business after experiencing a friend's stove.

Matt Atkinson, co-owner of Leisure Line Stove Company, in the firm's Berwick, Pa., factory. His company hopes to encourage more people to switch to burning anthracite coal to heat their homes. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Matt Atkinson, co-owner of Leisure Line Stove Company, in the firm's Berwick, Pa., factory. His company hopes to encourage more people to switch to burning anthracite coal to heat their homes.

Jeff Brady/NPR

"When I opened the door, I felt this warmth that I had never felt before. ... And I was hooked instantly," says Atkinson. Talk to coal-heat advocates in Pennsylvania, and you'll hear this repeatedly — that there's no heat as intense as coal heat.

It's clear that many people in northeastern Pennsylvania, the heart of anthracite coal country, have an emotional attachment to this fossil fuel.

"You have people here that their great-great-grandfathers were miners. Their grandfathers were miners. It's a family of mining," says Andrew Meyers, sales manager for Blaschak Coal Corp. His company also is leading the campaign to attract new customers.

"It's mostly about growing market share within the home-heating industry," says Atkinson. He hopes to attract a new generation of customers with the message that they can save money on heating their home if they choose coal.

Kelly Brown stands in front of a pile of coal. Her family's business, F.M. Brown's Sons, has sold coal for nearly a century. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Kelly Brown stands in front of a pile of coal. Her family's business, F.M. Brown's Sons, has sold coal for nearly a century.

Jeff Brady/NPR

In Reading, Pa., Kelly Brown welcomes the campaign. Her family's business, F.M. Brown's Sons, has sold coal for nearly a century and is one of the few to survive the industry's decline.

"In this general area, there was probably about 50 coal companies. Slowly, one by one, they started closing up," says Brown. Now her company is the only one left in Berks County.

She says the industry has improved its environmental record over the years. Pennsylvania was the first state to pass an act to address abandoned-mine reclamation, and today coal companies like to tout their work in this area.

Given Pennsylvania's abundant coal reserves and a bigger focus on improving coal's environmental record, Brown hopes the industry will stage a comeback. "I might not see it in my lifetime, but I think things will turn around," she says.

So far the trend is not moving in Brown's favor. Even in Pennsylvania, the number of households using coal for heat continues a steady decline.

Sours: https://www.npr.org/2019/03/03/699325560/for-the-few-who-heat-homes-with-coal-its-still-king
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Coal & Delivery

Utilizing our fleet of delivery trucks and trailers, we can effortlessly provide reliable service to your home, farm or business.

We operate a top notch, clean fleet of equipment. Our trucks are capable of hauling 5 ton maximum per delivery, minimum is based on your location. We’ve purchased smaller trucks, to allow us to cross your lawn without worry of excessive damage to the turf, and we are able to access extremely tight locations with ease.

From simple dump-and-go deliveries, chuting through a basement window, or augering into a gravity wagon or shed- we have the equipment needed to get the job done efficiently.

Bagged deliveries are loaded loose into the truck and dumped on your driveway or tarp in location of your choice, if you don’t have a tractor/forklift capable of lifting full skids available. Hand-stacking is available and billed hourly in addition to the delivery charge.

We do our best to maintain fair, and affordable delivery rates. Charges are based on distance from our location in Canadice, NY to you. The charge is a flat rate, and covers the entire load regardless of volume ordered, up to the maximum of 5ton per load. Please call or email us for a delivery quote.

Or click here to order coal online for pickup or delivery!

Sours: http://thecoalshop.com/coal-delivery/

Penn Keystone Coal has bagged Anthracite coal available in clean, convenient 50 pound tear resistant poly bags. 

 50 bags per pallet (1 1/4 ton), 18 pallets per truckload (900 bags), 22.5 tons. 

Retail Dealers: We have bagged coal in bulk ready for shipment.  Tired of waiting for coal?  Call or email us today! 

Available sizes:

          Stove: 2 7/6 x 1 5/8

          Chestnut: 1 5/8 x 13/16

          Pea: 13/16 x 9/16

          Buckwheat No. 1: 9/16 x 5/16

          Rice: 5/16 x 3/16

 Pallets are wrapped in plastic for outdoor storage.

 You must have access to a forklift or skid loader to unload palletized coal.

Coal is clean, high quality Anthracite both surface and deep mined and bagged with 25+ years of plant experience.

We will deliver or you may arrange pickup.  Our bagging plant is in eastern Pennsylvania a few miles off of Interstate 81 in the heart of the Anthracite fields.

Please call or email for pricing and availability.  [email protected]

Anthracite in single bags or small lots available for shipment anywhere in the US for cost  plus FedEx Ground shipping charges.  

Visit our sister site: www.baggedcoal.com

Sours: http://www.penncoal.com/bagged.html

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