Sacrifice combo mtg

Sacrifice combo mtg DEFAULT
Sacrifice
Keyword Action
IntroducedAlpha(mechanic)
Revised Edition(keyword)
Last UsedEvergreen
Reminder TextNo official reminder text
Scryfall Search
oracle:"Sacrifice"

Sacrifice, often shortened to sac, is a keyword action. It means to move a permanent you control to its owner's graveyard.

Description[]

Sacrificing or saccing is purposely or forcefully removing a permanent from play. This can be due to an effect on the card itself, the effect of another permanent already in play, coming into or leaving play or a spell such as an instant or sorcery. A sacrificed permanent cannot be regenerated. Even though the card Sacrifice was in Alpha, the keyword action of sacrifice didn't show up until Revised Edition.[1]

Strategy[]

Sacrifice decks have a unique strategy: convert one resource into another that leads you to victory. One of the first competitive combo sacrifice decks is among the most famous in its history: Prosperous Bloom.[2]

Rules[]

From the Comprehensive Rules (September 24, 2021—Innistrad: Midnight Hunt)

  • 701.17.Sacrifice
    • 701.17a To sacrifice a permanent, its controller moves it from the battlefield directly to its owner’s graveyard. A player can’t sacrifice something that isn’t a permanent, or something that’s a permanent they don’t control. Sacrificing a permanent doesn’t destroy it, so regeneration or other effects that replace destruction can’t affect this action.

Examples[]

Example 1

Arms Dealer{2}{R}
Creature — Goblin
1/1
{1}{R}, Sacrifice a Goblin: Arms Dealer deals 4 damage to target creature.

Example 2

Cruel Edict{1}{B}
Sorcery
Target opponent sacrifices a creature.

Example 3

Krark-Clan Ironworks{4}
Artifact
Sacrifice an artifact: Add {C}{C}.

Forced sacrifice[]

Cards that prevent/prohibit sacrificing[]

References[]

Sours: https://mtg.fandom.com/wiki/Sacrifice

Throw It All Away

There are countless strategies in Magic. Some decks rely on big creatures to overpower blockers. Some decks swarm the battlefield to defeat opponents before they even get started. Some decks sit back and react to everything opponents try before taking over the game.

But there's one path to victory that doesn't look at racing ahead or overtop opponents and doesn't try to stymie what the opponent is doing and take over later. It asks you a straightforward question: what would you sacrifice to win?

"Sacrifice" decks have a unique strategy: convert, usually through some sacrifice effect on cards, one resource into another that leads you to victory. These decks have come and gone through the years in Magic events. One of the first competitive combo decks is among the most famous in its history: ProsBloom.

ProsBloom

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DecklistStatsSample Hand

One of early Standard's breakout decks, it revolved around exiling cards in your hand to Cadaverous Bloom and sacrificing lands to Squandered Resources to build up either Prosperity (which gets you more lands to make more mana) or Drain Life (which actually wins the game). But exiling cards from your hand isn't the kind of sacrifice most of us think of today.

"Abzan" Rock

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DecklistStatsSample Hand

Magic Pro League player Javier Dominguez made a breakthrough at Worlds 2005 with a white-black-green deck called "The Rock" and is a forerunner of the modern sacrifice strategies. Unlike ProsBloom, this deck trades on-board resources for a variety of benefits:

The deck, like all Rock decks, builds incremental advantage and is willing to sacrifice resources to get a net incremental benefit. But it's still not quite a Sacrifice deck inasmuch as a grinding midrange deck.

Sours: https://magic.wizards.com/en/articles/archive/card-preview/what-would-you-sacrifice-win-2020-07-28
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If you like synergy-driven aggro decks and want to stand a good chance against UGx Food–or are looking toward a possible future without as many Food decks–then Rakdos Sacrifice may be the perfect Standard deck for you.

Witch's OvenCauldron Familiar

The deck features several combos. One of the most iconic is to cook a Cat over and over again to drain your opponent while chump-blocking each turn.

If you control Midnight Reaper, then you’re drawing a card every time you sacrifice Cauldron Familiar. And if you control Mayhem Devil, which is the key card that the entire archetype revolves around, you get two damage triggers per sacrifice cycle: One for sacrificing the Cat and one for sacrificing the Food. These triggers add up.

Claim the FirstbornPriest of Forgotten Gods

Another combo is to steal a creature and sacrifice it to Priest of Forgotten Gods. Sometimes you get to steal a big Hydroid Krasis, pressure their planeswalker, force them to sacrifice Wicked Wolf, and swing the game around completely. As the deck contains a plethora of sacrifice effects, Claim the Firstborn is often even better than a removal spell.

Rakdos Sacrifice is not only fun to play, but it also found a lot of success in recent high-level tournaments. First of all, Antonino de Rosa went 13-2 at the Arena MCQW. The next weekend at MagicFest Lyon, Andreas Ganz finished fourth at the Grand Prix, and Giona Cai won a PTQ. I talked to or watched games of all these players, and I combined their insights with my experience playing the deck on Magic Arena. Currently, I’d recommend the following list.

Rakdos Sacrifice

 

Arena Export

2 Castle Locthwain (ELD) 241
4 Blood Crypt (RNA) 245
3 Fabled Passage (ELD) 244
2 Cavalier of Night (M20) 94
4 Gutterbones (RNA) 76
4 Cauldron Familiar (ELD) 81
4 Mayhem Devil (WAR) 204
4 Midnight Reaper (GRN) 77
4 Priest of Forgotten Gods (RNA) 83
2 Rankle, Master of Pranks (ELD) 101
4 Claim the Firstborn (ELD) 118
2 Noxious Grasp (M20) 110
9 Swamp (ELD) 261
6 Mountain (ELD) 265
2 Angrath’s Rampage (WAR) 185
4 Witch’s Oven (ELD) 237
Sideboard
1 Bedevil (RNA) 157
2 Noxious Grasp (M20) 110
1 Embereth Shieldbreaker (ELD) 122
1 Mask of Immolation (M20) 151
4 Dreadhorde Butcher (WAR) 194
4 Duress (M20) 97
2 Theater of Horrors (RNA) 213

[collapse]

Throne of Eldraine Standard Top 50

Card Choices

My list is a couple cards different from Antonino de Rosa’s MCQW list, whose viability in a UGx Food metagame I highlighted at the end of my previous article.

Chandra, Acolyte of FlameRankle, Master of Pranks - Extended Art

Antonino’s list exploited Chandra, Acolyte of Flame because her sacrificial 1/1s have amazing synergy with Priest of Forgotten Gods and Mayhem Devil. While Chandra is clearly very powerful in the deck, fitting a 1RR card into the mana base when you also want to cast black one-drops on turn one is difficult. Also, the deck already had more than enough three-drops.

Therefore, I cut Chandra and added Rankle, which fits the sacrifice theme. I felt somewhat validated in this tweak when I saw that Andreas Ganz also cut Chandra in his Grand Prix Lyon Top 4 deck and that Giona Cai also included Rankle in his PTQ-winning decklist. Once Chandra was no longer present, I cut a removal spell for the fourth Gutterbones and tweaked the mana base. I made sure to reduce the likelihood of opening with too many tap-lands.

Theater of HorrorsBedevil

I added these cards to the sideboard to help turn into a control deck for Games 2 and 3 against UGx Food. As Giona Cai told me, they often think we are an aggro deck and board accordingly, and they tend to cut Hydroid Krasis because they fear Claim the Firstborn. This provides the perfect opportunity to outmaneuver them by transforming into a go-big control deck post-sideboard.

Tips and tricks

  • You can target your own creatures with Claim the Firstborn. This can be useful to untap and/or give haste to Priest of Forgotten Gods so you can get an extra activation that turn.
  • When playing against creatureless control decks, you can turn Claim the Firstborn into Lava Spike by giving a random Midnight Reaper haste.
  • Mayhem Devil triggers not only off of your own sacrifices, but also your opponent’ sacrifices. This includes Food tokens, Fabled Passage, or any permanent they sacrifice to Angrath’s Rampage or Priest of Forgotten Gods.
  • If you hold priority (i.e., hold Control when playing online) then you can sacrifice multiple Food tokens to the same Cauldron Familiar. This can come in handy when you want to get multiple Mayhem Devil triggers.
  • Always play your lands; don’t hold them to bluff. You’ll be thankful when you draw Castle Locthwain.
  • Rakdos Sacrifice has a surprisingly strong late-game. For example, you can sacrifice Cavalier of Night to Witch’s Oven, return Mayhem Devil, and “combo-kill” them out of nowhere with a large number of sacrifice triggers.
  • Don’t crack Fabled Passage unnecessarily because you might find Mayhem Devil, and the free point of damage is generally more important than deck thinning.
  • Normally, the activated ability of Priest of Forgotten Gods has only one target: your opponent. This means that a well-timed Veil of Summer will counter it. However, you can target yourself in addition to your opponent. In that case, Veil of Summer means that they won’t have to sacrifice, but you still get the mana and draw a card. This is sometimes worth it, especially if you control Mayhem Devil.
  • Sometimes it’s best to not return Cauldron Familiar at the end of your opponent’s turn. This is especially true when you are planning to cast Mayhem Devil next turn and could use a free ping or if you control Theater of Horrors.
  • The dream is to assemble Witch’s Oven + Cauldron Familiar + Mayhem Devil, which yields two pings and one drain for free every turn. However, Witch’s Oven + Gutterbones + Mayhem Devil is also a decent engine: It yields two pings and three life for five mana each turn.
  • Extra copies of Witch’s Oven are not dead draws, because they allow you to return and trigger Cauldron Familiar multiple times per turn.

Is Rakdos better than Jund or Four-Color?

The core of Mayhem Devil, Cauldron Familiar, and Witch’s Oven is also found in decks with Gilded Goose and Once Upon a Time. At Grand Prix Lyon, Jund versions and Four-color versions both performed well, and I think the Four-color version is particularly powerful. Combining Korvold, Fae-Cursed King with Oko, Thief of Crowns can set up incredible synergies, making it a great option for midrange players. A Sultai Food deck with the Cat engine also was the most successful Food variant at Mythic Championship VI in Richmond.

The main reason for sticking with Rakdos Sacrifice is that I like the its more aggressive slant, clear focus, and reliable mana base. It’s mostly a play style preference for aggressive decks, but I’m a sucker for anything that vaguely reminds me of Modern Affinity. Also, Oko or Gilded Goose might be banned soon, which invalidates the long-term prospects of the Four-color version.

Sideboard Guide

Dreadhorde Butcher comes in against most decks without Gilded Goose. Generally speaking, one or two Claim the Firstborn can usually be shaved because opponents tend to have more removal and interaction post-board, which means that you’re less likely to control a sacrifice outlet for Claim the Firstborns in Games 2 and 3.

Below I describe how I have been boarding. Sometimes I change things up slightly, for example by cutting a land on the draw.

Vs Bant/Sultai/Simic Food

+2 Noxious Grasp +1 Bedevil +2 Theater of Horrors

-2 Claim the Firstborn -2 Gutterbones -1 Priest of Forgotten Gods

Vs Golgari Adventures

+1 Mask of Immolation +2 Noxious Grasp +1 Bedevil

-1 Gutterbones -1 Claim the Firstborn -2 Angrath’s Rampage

Vs Gruul Aggro

+2 Noxious Grasp +1 Bedevil

-1 Midnight Reaper -1 Claim the Firstborn -1 Gutterbones

Vs Temur Reclamation / Jeskai Fires

+4 Duress +2 Theater of Horrors +4 Dreadhorde Butcher +1 Bedevil

-2 Noxious Grasp -4 Claim the Firstborn -4 Priest of Forgotten Gods -1 Witch’s Oven

Vs Rakdos Sacrifice

+4 Dreadhorde Butcher +1 Embereth Shieldbreaker +1 Mask of Immolation

-2 Noxious Grasp -2 Gutterbones -2 Angrath’s Rampage

Tags: Aristocrats mtg, Cauldron Familiar Combo, Frank Karsten, MTG Arena, Rakdos Sacrifice

Sours: https://strategy.channelfireball.com/all-strategy/mtg/channelmagic-articles/standard-deck-guide-rakdos-sacrifice/

 

 

Today’s deck, Standard RB Sacrifice, is the most unique deck from the past MPL League Weekend in the Standard portion, brought to you by Andrew Cuneo.

 

Extus, Oriq Overlord // Awaken the Blood AvatarBastion of RemembranceEyetwitch

It’s a Red/Black Sacrifice deck that uses learn as well as cheap creatures and sacrifice outlets to go wide and hopefully finish the opponent off with Bastion of Remembrance.  I’ve always really liked Extus, Oriq Overlord, and this deck seeks to make good use of him.

Awaken the Blood Avatar is a great combo with cards like Woe Strider and Forbidden Friendship that give two tokens, allowing Awaken the Blood Avatar to be cast as early as the fourth turn  (potentially even turn three with a one drop into Forbidden Friendship).  A 3/6 haste that does three damage when attacking kills very quickly and, against decks like Red or Gruul, can be very hard to remove.

If you’re looking for something that’s maybe not as popular as other decks to try out and be competitive, this is a strong deck that’s worth playing.

 

Tags: Andrew Cuneo, awaken the blood avatar, extus, highlight mtg, Mardu, Rakdos, RB, Sacrifice, Standard, standard mtg, William "Huey" Jensen

Sours: https://strategy.channelfireball.com/all-strategy/home/standard-rb-sacrifice-deck-highlight/

Combo mtg sacrifice

New set, new cards, relatively new format. What more could you ask for?

Jumpstart was released last week in paper and on MTG Arena. A Limited event is currently going on for the new set, but I was most excited about the new cards for Historic and how they would impact the format. With hundreds of new cards in Historic, it's a little overwhelming. Craterhoof Behemoth, Muxus, Goblin Grandee, Kor Spiritdancer... where do you possibly begin?

With Rakdos Sacrifice, of course.

Rakdos Sacrifice was already a powerful strategy in general, however it was greatly hindered in Historic by Nexus of Fate decks. Not only did Nexus of Fate get the ban-hammer, but Jumpstart injected many powerful cards into the archetype to make the deck thrive. 

Blood Artist wasn't the first card that caught my eye for Rakdos Sacrifice, but it slots perfectly into the deck. It's not a very good blocker, but when your deck is based around shoving cats into ovens, the extra damage goes a long way—especially in grindy matchups.

As early as turn two, you can turn your Cauldron Familiar/Witch's Oven combo into an extra damage per turn. When you pair this with Priest of Forgotten Gods activations and Mayhem Devil triggers, the damage output becomes significant. On top of that, Blood Artist triggers off of your opponent's creatures dying AND gains you some life back. This card is a slam dunk in Rakdos Sacrifice, and can definitely propel the archetype into a tier 1 strategy.

Yes, you read that correctly. Naturally, during Jumpstart spoilers I assumed that Phyrexian Tower was one of the cards that wasn't going to make it onto MTGA, like Lightning Bolt or Reanimate. You can imagine my utter shock and awe when I realized this powerful card was actually printed into Historic.

Phyrexian Tower might be the single most powerful card printed into the format in Jumpstart. For starters, sacrifice is a powerful mechanic—it's literally in the deck's name! Along with that, it is a powerful mechanic that doesn't have any restrictions—it is a free activation that gives you mana advantage. I've played various sacrifice decks in Standard for a handful of months now, and in each version having an active sacrifice source in play is one of the most important things in every single matchup. 

So what are some broken things Phyrexian Tower can enable? For starters, you can play one of your three-drops on turn two. Mayhem Devil and Woe Strider are both impactful creatures in the deck on turn three, so imagine their strength a whole turn earlier. Another powerful thing you can do is turn one mopey creature such as a Goat token into two better creatures like Serrated Scorpion and Gutterbones. If you have a Priest of Forgotten Gods in play you can then sacrifice those creatures to Priest and produce two more mana after drawing a card. Alternatively, you can change the creature into a Blood Artist of a Priest of Forgotten Gods. You can even steal their creature with Claim the Firstborn then turn their creature into more mana!

Grim Lavamancer is less flashy than the other two cards, but it's a great reprint into Historic and has the potential to really impact the format. Rakdos Sacrifice isn't afraid to put some cards into the graveyard, so being able to utilize those extra cards with a repeatable removal effect is relevant in many matchups: aggro, the mirror, even control to shoot down some planeswalkers! Grim Lavamancer does it all, and I wouldn't be surprised if the card continues to gain popularity in Historic. 

The Decklist

This is my initial starting point with Rakdos Sacrifice. It's an aggressive build that tries to kill the opponent as early as possible, but has some ways to thrive in the late game with recursion cards like Gutterbones, Woe Strider and Cauldron Familiar. This makes the deck less susceptible to board wipes and other spot removal than some other builds of Rakdos Sacrifice.

Rakdos Sacrifice is a little weak to Temur Reclamation, which is picking up popularity in Historic, which is why I have favored a more aggressive build of this deck. If you want to get even more aggressive, you can add some extra Dreadhorde Butcher in place of Claim the Firstborn or Woe Strider. 

Magic: The Gathering TCG Deck - Rakdos Sacrifice by Ally Warfield

'Rakdos Sacrifice' - constructed deck list and prices for the Magic: The Gathering Trading Card Game from TCGplayer Infinite!

Created By: Ally Warfield

Event:

Rank:

Historic

Market Price: $207.06

Cards

Gameplay

If you have played any Rakdos Sacrifice in Standard, you'll find the game play of the Historic deck to be very similar. I've already mentioned the appeal and tricks with Blood Artist and Phyrexian Tower, which are some of the biggest differences in gameplay. If you are not familiar with this archetype, here are some tips and tricks to playing Rakdos Sacrifice in Historic:

  • If you have the Cauldron Familiar/Witch's Oven combo in play, you'll want to leave your Cauldron Familiar in the graveyard on the opponent's end step if you do not plan on attacking with it. There are a couple reasons for this. First, you don't want to give your opponent the opportunity to kill your cat without an active sacrifice source. The most detrimental example of this would be if your opponent Scorching Dragonfires your Cauldron Familiar. Additionally, because you are not going to do a point of damage by attacking, you can deal an extra point of damage with Mayhem Devil by sacrificing the Food token after you play the Mayhem Devil.
  • Make sure you know how much mana you have access to. Priest of Forgotten Gods and Phyrexian Tower give you extra mana, so plan your turns accordingly. You don't want to sacrifice a creature when you don't have to just to play a Woe Strider.
  • Speaking of Priest of Forgotten Gods, she pairs very well with Gutterbones. When activating Priest, Gutterbones is always a good creature to sacrifice because Priest's ability alone can bring Gutterbones back to hand from the graveyard with the life loss and mana generation. 
  • This deck is a lot of math and counting. It gets easier the more you play, but it's difficult to keep track of every point of damage you're dealing each turn when you account for Cauldron Familiar, Blood Artist and Mayhem Devil with one or multiple Witch's Ovens. Take your time to count out just how much damage you have in a single turn cycle so you don't accidentally misplay or miss lethal. 
  • If you have extra Food tokens in play, don't be afraid to sacrifice your Cauldron Familiar to Woe Strider for additional scry effects (as well as other triggers from Blood Artist and Mayhem Devil). You're able to bring your cat back multiple times before you even activate Witch's Oven, AND you get extra value from doing so. 
  • Claim the Firstborn can target your own creatures! If you really need to activate Priest of Forgotten Gods right away, target her with Claim the Firstborn and get to sacrificing!
  • In the mirror, Blood Artist and Mayhem Devil both serve as good cards in your deck, but also hate cards against your opponent. These cards will slow down their board progression and allow you to catch up or pull ahead.
  • In the mirror, there will be times when both players have a Mayhem Devil in play. If either player starts a chain of sacrifices, the Devils will target each other and both die in a blaze of glory. You want this to happen on your opponent's turn, because the active player's Mayhem Devil triggers will resolve last. That means there will be a short window while their Mayhem Devil is dead and yours has 2 damage on it, with the last of their Devil triggers on the stack. I've often used this window to trigger my Mayhem Devil as many more times as I can, killing off the rest of their creatures before I allow my opponent's final Mayhem Devil trigger to resolve and kill my Devil.

Sideboard Guide

Vs. The Mirror

Vs. Temur Reclamation

Vs. Goblins

Vs. Field of the Dead

Field of the Dead has decreased in popularity since day one of Jumpstart because of the poor matchup with aggressive decks and Temur Reclamation. If you specifically want to beat this deck you should consider Virulent Plague in the sideboard.

Vs. Azorius Control

* * *

Is Rakdos Sacrifice the future in Historic? Absolutely. The sheer power of the new Jumpstart cards has propelled an already successful archetype into a tier 1 strategy. Doubling your Cauldron Familiar damage output with Blood Artist or playing your powerful three-drops on turn two has made Rakdos Sacrifice a deck that can compete at the highest ranks of Mythic on Arena. Get out and grab your Jumpstart cards while you can, Rakdos Sacrifice is here to make its mark on Historic. 

 

Sours: https://infinite.tcgplayer.com/article/Rakdos-Sacrifice-Is-the-Future-of-Historic/c65c0f29-87ff-47fe-ac8e-b006f6e0112e/
MTG Arena - Standard - Spider Sacrifice

Rakdos Sacrifice Deck Guide – #2 Mythic (Updated)

Rakdos, a colour combination beloved by many, and yet so few times has it ever been playable, let alone a competitive option to bring to any high stakes tournament. It wasn’t until Theros Beyond Death that the Rakdos Sacrifice archetype finally started taking shape; fast forward to the release of Core Set 21 and Rakdos got some new toys to play with, but the few really outshone the many.

My name is Samsoni1 and I managed to hit Rank #2 on July 1st and 31st in the Red Bull International Qualifier II with Rakdos Sacrifice. I’ll be going over some of my choices, the ins and outs of playing the deck, and how to sideboard versus certain matchups.

July 16th Update: This guide has been updated after my performance at the Red Bull International Qualifier II in which I placed 31st and made day 2. I made small changes to the deck so with that in mind here are the changes.

  • Added Noxious Grasp explanation
  • Updated Tormod’s Crypt explanation
  • Updated Rotting Regisaur explanation
  • Updated sideboard Guide

Decklist

 

Companion

1

Jegantha, the Wellspring

Creatures (24)

4

Priest of Forgotten Gods

2

Judith, the Scourge Diva

Spells (9)

1

Call of the Death-Dweller

Artifacts (4)
Lands (23)

Cards (60)

Deck Summary

A deck that seeks to exploit sacrifice synergies to gain a massive early advantage over its opponents, and dominates creature decks by stealing and sacrificing their stuff or invalidating attackers with the Cauldron Familiar-Witch’s Oven combo.

Archetype: {B}{R} Rakdos Sacrifice
Format:Traditional (BO3) Standard
Tier:1

The Good

  • Capable of explosive aggressive starts.
  • Still great in the late game, has good chances to win by burning away the opponent’s life total directly or replenishing its hand a bunch.
  • Great matchups against all manner of creature decks.

The Bad

  • Not as fast as the true aggressive decks; can sometimes be too slow to kill decks like Reclamation, which have absurd midgame.
  • Some weaknesses to graveyard hate.
  • Awkward two-colour aggro deck mana base.

Card Choices

We have the core package of Cauldron Familiar, Witch’s Oven, Claim the Firstborn, Priest of Forgotten Gods, Woe Strider, and Mayhem Devil, as always. This build is very much centered on aggression; we are not trying to out-value our opponents with Reaper or accrue small amounts of extra value. Our objective is to reduce our opponent’s life total from 20 to 0 in the quickest way possible.

Let’s go more in detail in some of the choices with this deck:

Main Deck

Jegantha, the Wellspring (Companion): Jegantha is literally free to be used as a companion in this deck: we lose out on Rankle who has never really a key part of the deck and we lose out on maybe two potential sideboard cards. which are easily replaceable. The Companion tax is generally not an issue, and rarely are you ever in a position where you NEED to get Jegantha onto the board; instead, you will find a lot of situations where you just have three extra mana, from Priest activation or in general, especially in the later game. Jegantha really just reads as a 5/5 beatstick or two food tokens, which matter a lot more than you might think as I have won more games because of those than I would like to admit…

Village Rites: A new addition from M21 and one of the most powerful sacrifice effects in recent memory. This allows you to go a bit longer without running out of gas vs some of the midrange and control matchups, while also allowing you to sacrifice creatures you Claim the Firstborn from your opponents, if you don’t have one of your other sacrifice outlets. This card isn’t that great in aggro matchups; I usually end up cutting one or both of them there as they are a good comeback card, but having multiples when you want to have a board state isn’t helpful.

Dreadhorde Butcher: Dreadhorde Butcher has served me time and time again; this card will beat face and, if left uncontested, WILL kill your opponents by itself. It can be a little rough with the rise of Bant decks running Arboreal Grazer, but the card is good enough, regardless of the downsides.

Call of the Death-Dweller: A new card from Ikoria, I used to run this as a one-of but with the new cards from M21, I’ve increased it to two. This card combos amazingly well with Mayhem Devil, Judith, and Butcher, as giving any of those creatures deat touch generally is game over for your opponent, granting you insane tempo swings or just complete control over the board – if those cards have deathtouch, their ping effects will destroy any creature.

Judith, the Scourge Diva: Judith is to be used here as your fifth and sixth copy of Mayhem Devil, while simultaneously being a better standalone card than Devil, which doesn’t have the same impact without specific synergies, which the deck has many of. Judith, with her Anthem effect, helps you push a lot of damage when you face the ramp and control decks; she may look weak on paper, but in practice she puts in a LOT of work.

Gutterbones: Gutterbones is in here to be a very aggressive and recursive threat. While Serrated Scorpion is a consideration over Gutterbones, the meta is looking to be in a good spot to jam the boney boy. I would not be surprised if I started to run the Scorp over Bones in the future.

Noxious Grasp: With the increase of Scavenging Ooze, Nissa, Who Shakes the World, and Nightpack Ambusher being main decked by Temur Reclamation decks and Bant with its ability to tune its deck to be particularly vindictive to whatever they feel like, I’ve felt that main decking two copies of grasp has been very helpful and even vital in order to stay ahead of this meta. The only time this card is dead is if you’re against Mono Red, Mono Black, or the mirror.

Sideboard

Liliana’s Standard Bearer: SO….Buckle up. This card is here to be your BETTER Midnight Reaper; yes, I know that statement sounds suspicious, but hear me out. Midnight Reaper is only good when your opponent is killing your creatures or if you are killing your own creatures, which isn’t that reliable. In the current meta, there are 2 other decks that are killing your dudes: Bant and Aggro decks, and aggro decks LOVE to see a Reape, since it’s going to help them kill you. Bant doesn’t care about Reaper since they have 5 million different ways of dealing with it before they wipe your boardstate.

NOW STANDARD BEARER ON THE OTHER HAND. You only want this card in matchups like Bant or U/W or Temur Rec: if you can’t get good value out of your Call of the Death-Dwellers, you bring in Bearers over them. The way you want to play with this card is simple: does your opponent wrath the board? Cool, flash this in afterwards; you can also leave your Cauldron Familiar to die, not oven it, and simply flash this dude in, hold priority (Full Control) and sac the Bearer in response to its ETB trigger. This allows you to draw more cards, or you can just leave it on the board and have a 3/1 beater. Also, Bearer mitigates the power of instant-speed wraths, since you just draw your new hand in main phase 2 if they wrath in combat. You can even do some fancy plays with Priest of the Forgotten Gods, since a good amount of the times you will be activating Priest in combat to deal with flash creatures or sharknados. Bearer also gives you a good way to use your mana in areas you may not expect. Just trust me on this on and give it a try; I promise I’m not memeing with this card.

Rotting Regisaur: Everyones favorite big stupid idiot dino, you bring this boi in vs Temur Reclamation, Mono Red, Mono Green and Gruul. If you need a wall and a beater this is your boi. I get a lot of questions about why I don’t bring this in vs Bant and the answer is simple. They have too many ways to deal with it, From Glass Casket, Devout Decree, Teferi, Time Raveler, Elspeth Conquers Death to straight up Shatter the Sky. You never want to bring it in against any deck that has access to White or Black, exception being Four-Color Reclamation (but that deck doesn’t count!).

Eliminate: Eliminate is Black’s version of Scorching Dragonfire; I’m still working on numbers and may bump this up to two, but right now I’m really happy with how this card is performing. If you have doubts, just consider how much you care about an exile clause over straight up kill a dude.

Tormod’s Crypt: So you may be asking why isn’t this Soul-Guide Lantern? Simple, this card is FREE; the fact that it costs zero mana allows you to have a lot of random combo turns where you can Claim say a Cauldron Familiar, Village Rites it, and then cast Crypt to get rid of that Cat for good, all on turn 2. This card is a lot more effective in my build than others since we have such a high count of 1 and 2 cost spells in our deck, I prefer the speed of crypt and its ability to play it while being aggressive than being value focused with Soul-Guide Lantern. The other thing you want to think about is exiling your opponent’s grave is never worth a Mana and it’s barely worth a card for that matter. Remember this deck is an aggro deck; yes, drawing cards is nice but just straight up exiling your opponents bin, for literally no mana, is much better for our strategy.

Matchup and Sideboard Guide

I am always evolving and trying to tune the sideboard best for the meta at hand. If you check this article again next week, there is a good chance you will see something different as I update the list while the meta progresses or evolves.  That being said, let’s go over what to take in/out when you face certain matchups.

Bant Ramp/Flash

InOut
3 Agonizing Remorse
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Liliana’s Standard Bearer
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Village Rites
1 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
1 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Dreadhorde Butcher
1 Mayhem Devil
1 Call of the Death-Dweller

Bant can be tricky as there going to be bringing in Glass Caskets, Devout Decrees and, on top of that, they play Ugin. You really need to aggro this deck down, while also making sure you don’t overextend into a Shatter which, if you do, you have Liliana’s Standard Bearer to help mitigate the losses.

If you’re on the draw I keep 1 Rite in, if you’re on the play I keep 3 Claims.

Sultai Ramp

InOut
3 Agonizing Remorse
1 Noxious Grasp
1 Tormod’s Crypt
1 Act of Treason
1 Village Rites
1 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
1 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Mayhem Devil
1 Call of the Death-Dweller

Sultai is by far one of your harder matchups, since most of their board removal is exile-based. You always have to respect your opponent having Cry of the Carnarium, so sac Cauldron Familiar on your turn while you have Cat Oven out, even if it means you do less damage. Call isn’t that great here, since their removal is exile-based, but it’s still helpful to catch yourself back up. If your opponent doesn’t have Polukranos or Cavalier, you can take Act of Treason out and add Priest back in. You side one Devil out, as he’s a tad slow, and Judith will kill your opponent much faster.

Temur Reclamation

InOut
3 Rotting Regisaur
3 Agonizing Remorse
1 Noxious Grasp
1 Liliana’s Standard Bearer
1 Village Rites
2 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
2 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Mayhem Devil
1 Call of the Death-Dweller

Regi is the best card in the matchup. Resolve this card ASAP and Rec just rolls over. We side out 1 Devil and 2 Rites in this matchup, as you’re trying to aggro your opponent down asap. Watch out for Purphoros’s Intervention/Borrower, as those deal with Reg. If your opponent is on Ral’s Outburst over Flame Sweep/Storm’s Wrath, take Bearer out. You can mess with your Claim the Firstborn numbers depending on Play/Draw.

Mono Red/Cavalcade Red

InOut
1 Eliminate
2 Rotting Regisaur
1 Act of Treason
2 Noxious Grasp
1 Judith, the Scourge Diva
1 Gutterbones

Mono Red is one of your best matchups; Regi is a wall that Red can’t get over. We only bring in 2 as Red can go wide and Regi will only buy you 2-3 turns. Act of Treason deals with Torbran and Anax well, and more steal effects are good here.

Mono Green

InOut
2 Rotting Regisaur
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
1 Act of Treason
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Village Rites
1 Dreadhorde Butcher
1 Gutterbones
1 Woe Strider
1 Mayhem Devil

This is a ridiculously easy matchup for us. If your Priest is uncontested, you just win the game. We have Breakers for Stonecoil Serpents/The Great Henge, Act of Treason because they have big bois, and Regi is here to block said big bois.

Mono Black

InOut
1 Eliminate
1 Act of Treason
2 Noxious Grasp

This matchup is also easy: if you keep a priest on board, you win, Claim is your best card to deal with opposing Regis, and Act is brought in to deal with Rankle/Spawn of Mayhem.

Gruul Aggro

InOut
3 Rotting Regisaur
1 Noxious Grasp
1 Eliminate
1 Act of Treason
1 Village Rites
1 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
1 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Judith, the Scourge Diva
1 Dreadhorde Butcher

This matchup is generally favourable for you. Games two and three, your opp will probably bring in Klothys, God of Destiny so be mindful about what you keep in your graveyard. Regi is brought in to be a wall and to beat face.

Sacrifice Mirror

InOut
1 Eliminate
1 Liliana’s Standard Bearer
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
1 Tormod’s Crypt
1 Act of Treason
2 Gutterbones
2 Dreadhorde Butcher
2 Noxious Grasp

This matchup is entirely based on who can cast and STICK a Mayhem Devil. Try to control the board the best you can and you should be fine.

Jund Sacrifice

InOut
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
1 Tormod’s Crypt
1 Act of Treason
3 Gutterbones
2 Dreadhorde Butcher

See Sacrifice Mirror notes. Grasp is in here for Scavenging Ooze and Korvold, Fae-Cursed King.

U/W Flyers

InOut
1 Eliminate
1 Noxious Grasp
1 Act of Treason
1 Village Rites
1 Gutterbones
1 Woe Strider

This matchup is almost laughably easy. Every card in your deck is designed to kill your opponents’ creatures or deal with their board. Watch out for Sephara (if they run it), Lofty Denial, and make sure you kill Skycat Sovereign.

B/W Yorion (I hate this deck)

InOut
3 Agonizing Remorse
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Liliana’s Standard Bearer
1 Village Rites
1 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
1 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Dreadhorde Butcher
1 Mayhem Devil
1 Call of the Death-Dweller
1 Woe Strider

This matchup sucks… Full stop. There is no other deck that obliterates you more than this one. Try to out-value them with your claims, deal with Kaya ASAP, and, if your opponents resolves Doom Foretold, it can sometimes kill them if you have Devil on board.

G/W Counters

InOut
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Rotting Regisaur
1 Eliminate
2 Village Rites
1 Dreadhorde Butcher
2 Gutterbones
1 Judith, the Scourge Diva

This can be a scary matchup: while it’s VERY much in your favor, the counters deck can explode and quickly take over the board if you let it. Always kill Conclave Mentor ASAP. If your priest remains uncontested, you basically have full control of the board.

Rakdos Knights

InOut
1 Eliminate
1 Embereth Shieldbreaker
1 Act of Treason
2 Noxious Grasp
1 Gutterbones

This matchup is almost a free win; your deck is designed to beat these types of decks, so just be careful about Rankle and Spawn of Mayhem.

U/W Control

InOut
3 Agonizing Remorse
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Liliana’s Standard Bearer
1 Act of Treason
4 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
1 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Dreadhorde Butcher
1 Mayhem Devil
1 Call of the Death-Dweller

This matchup is actually a lot harder than you might think, with Dream Trawler and Archon of Sun’s Grace being real problems for this deck. Not to mention, Omen of the Sun constantly giving blockers/lifegain; lets not get into what they’re going to be bringing in cause it just all sucks for us. Don’t overcommit to the board, as shatter still exists. Don’t worry too much about teferi; he’s just a tempo play, and a bad one at that. Bearer will give you a lot of card draw after they Shatter and instant speed board wipes aren’t the worst as a result; just try to force them to use those during combat and not at the end of your turn.

Esper Bolas

InOut
3 Agonizing Remorse
1 Noxious Grasp
2 Liliana’s Standard Bearer/Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Claim the Firstborn
1 Gutterbones
1 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Dreadhorde Butcher
1 Mayhem Devil

Esper Bolas can be a bit of a pain; you really have to be careful of whether your opp runs Cry of the Carnarium, or maindeck Kaya. Your gameplan is to just to aggro your opponent down before they stabilise and assemble too many planeswalkers.

Four-Color Reclamation

InOut
3 Agonizing Remorse
3 Rotting Regisaur
2 Liliana’s Standard Bearer
1 Village Rites
2 Claim the Firstborn
1 Call of the Death-Dweller
2 Priest of Forgotten Gods
1 Woe Strider
1 Mayhem Devil

This matchup is a bit harder since they have White in their deck. Be on the lookout for Devout Decree and Solar Blaze as that’s going to be their main ways to deal with our Rotting Regisaur.

Final Words

Thank you all so much for the kind words about this article, this is the first time I’ve ever done these and the fact so many of you trusted what I said and have even done well with it in tournaments over the past week has filled me with so much joy. If you have any questions you can @ me on Twitter or if you want to see me pilot this deck in action you can follow me on Twitch!

Sours: https://mtgazone.com/rakdos-sacrifice-deck-guide/

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Last updated on August 9, 2021

Omniscience | Illustration by Jason Chan

Omniscience | Illustration by Jason Chan

Time is an interesting concept, isn’t it? We’re bound by it no matter what we do and are aware that everything has an end as we desperately watch the clocks ticking. What a dramatic start right? This may be a dark way to start an article about MTG, but let me give you a hint so you can forget about the chains of time: you can use MTG to make your opponent suffer in an infinite loop and laugh as they realize they can do nothing to stop their inevitable loss. Unless they have a counterspell, which is always an option.

Let me lay it out plainly if you’re still lost: I wanna talk about some (there are a lot) infinite combos you can pull off in MTG. Specifically infinite combos in Modern and EDH.

As we all know, Magic is a very complex game. If you’re up for some academic reading, there’s a research paper by Alex Churchill, Stella Biderman, and Austin Herrick called “Magic: The Gathering is Turing Complete,” which argues that “MTG is the most computationally complex real-world game known in the literature.” There are more than 20,000 unique cards in MTG and more are added every year, so the number of plays you can actually pull off increases all the time.

What Are Infinite Combos?

With this many options, any experienced player could come up with a play that is literally unstoppable if the right conditions are set. There are some that provide infinite life, some that produce infinite mana, and some that can give one—occasionally all—of your creatures infinite power.

You could create endless armies or simply throw infinite spells at your opponent. I don’t know the exact number of infinite combos in MTG, but I’ll try to cover those that are most viable and well-known. So, without further ado, let’s get to it.

The Combos

Temur Sabertooth

This one is not about a single infinite combo, but a single card that has the potential to enable multiple infinite combos. Its ability looks pretty insignificant at first, but combined with certain cards, it can help you produce infinite mana, buff your creatures with a gazillion counters and draw at the same time, or even have infinite turns.

There are other combos that can go infinite with Temur Sabertooth, but we’ll focus on two in detail so you can get the hang of how infinite combos work in practice. I’ll be it a bit more succinct as we go down our list.

Zacama, Primal Calamity

So, here’s our first one. You need Temur Sabertooth, 12 mana, and Zacama, Primal Calamity. With Temur Sabertooth already on the board, tap your lands for 12 mana and play Zacama. As it enters the battlefield, Zacama will untap all your lands. Then you can use your floating mana to return it to your hand with Temur Sabertooth’s ability, which nets you an additional mana.

This is where the infinite combo comes into play: as your lands are untapped again, you can repeat the process until you gain infinite life. You can even play some enchantments that double your mana to gain faster access to this combo, like Mirari’s Wake.

Time Warp and Archaeomancer

  • Time Warp
  • Archaeomancer

Another combo you can use with Temur Sabertooth allows you to take infinite turns. This time you need two other cards: Time Warp and Archaeomancer. Once you’ve got all three ready to go, you only need enough mana to use them one after the other.

First, play Time Warp and return it to your hand with Archaeomancer. Next, use Temur Sabertooth’s ability to get Archaeomancer back to your hand. This is a certain win if your opponent doesn’t have a way to remove one of your creatures since you’ll be the only player that is, you know, playing. You can also replace Archaeomancer and Time Warp with any sorcery that gives you another turn before heading to the graveyard like Time Stretch or Time Walk plus a creature that allows you to bring a sorcery back from the dead.

Deceiver Exarch and Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker

  • Deceiver Exarch
  • Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker

A simple but effective combo that lets you create an infinite number of creatures to finish your opponent. First, get Deceiver Exarch on the battlefield and then play Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker targeting Exarch to create a copy of it. The new Exarch comes to the battlefield and untaps Kiki-Jiki. Repeat the process as many times as needed to finish your opponent since Exarch’s tokens will have haste.

This is also known as the Splinter Twin combo because the namesake enchantment works the same way as Kiki. You can also use Pestermite or Zealous Conscripts for your untapper.

Vizier of Remedies and Devoted Druid

  • Vizier of Remedies
  • Devoted Druid

This is a relatively cheap combo that produces infinite mana. Devoted Druid adds one green mana when tapped and can be untapped for a -1/-1 counter. Vizier of Remedies prevents it from getting this counter so you can continuously tap and untap Devoted Druid for infinite green mana.

Quillspike

You can also use Quillspike instead of the Vizier, which removes -1/-1 counters to get +3/+3, basically giving it an infinite amount of power with Devoted Druid. If you have any way to give it haste or it already got over its summoning sickness, the game is over. However, all it takes is a simple removal so your opponent can prevent their demise. Still, it’s a fun way to make your opponent sigh and give up the game.

Irencrag Feat, Prismite, and Nivix Guildmage

  • Irencrag Feat
  • Prismite
  • Nivix Guildmage

Another infinite-mana, instant-win combo that’s relatively easy to pull off. Irencrag Feat provides you with seven red mana, but also restricts you to casting one more spell that turn. But, this doesn’t prevent it from getting copied. So, tap Prismite to get a blue mana and just copy Irencrag with Nivix Guildmage. Then you can copy it again, again, and again to get an infinite amount of mana, which you can use to activate Nivix Guildmage’s draw/discard ability and get a spell like Banefire to kill off your opponent.

Morselhoarder

There are various ways to make this combo work, but I’ll go over just one since the concept is pretty simple. Morselhoarder comes into play with two -1/-1 counters and can add one mana by removing one of these counters. If you enchant it with Sinking Feeling, you can pay one mana to put another -1/-1 counter on and untap it. Finally, Power of Fire deals one damage whenever you tap Morselhoarder, and repeat the process unto forever.

Dramatic Snipe

You need four cards to make this combo work. First is Dramatic Reversal, which untaps all non-land permanents you control. Then you’ll need Elite Arcanist, allowing you to exile an instant card from your hand and copy it by paying its converted mana cost. You also need a creature or artifact that you can tap for two or more mana, like Hedron Archive. Finally, you need to have Guttersnipe on the battlefield to trigger its ability.

Here’s how it works: Hedron Archive and Guttersnipe are on the battlefield. Before you play Elite Arcanist, tap Hedron Archive to get two mana. Dramatic Reversal is then exiled and copied, untapping all permanents, which allows you to repeat the process infinitely. Since Dramatic Reversal will trigger Guttersnipe each time, you can deal infinite damage to your opponent.

Deadeye Navigator and Peregrine Drake

  • Deadeye Navigator
  • Peregrine Drake

Deadeye Navigator is another flexible card that is widely used for combos. It pairs with another creature thanks to its soulbond ability, which allows you to exile that creature and bring it back to the battlefield for two mana. Peregrine Drake untaps five lands when it enters the battlefield, so each time you exile and bring it back, you get three additional mana. You can also swap Peregrine Drake with Palinchron or Great Whale if they suit you better.

Ral, Storm Conduit and Double Expansion

  • Ral, Storm Conduit
  • Expansion // Explosion

Most of the combos here aren’t legal in Standard, but this one is, at least for another month or so. You’ll need Ral, Storm Conduit, two copies of Expansion, four mana to cast them in succession, and enough mana to get the combo going.

First, Ral needs to be on the battlefield. Then, cast any cheap spell (like Opt) to start the combo. Cast Expansion on the spell, then cast another Expansion to copy that, creating an infinite loop. Ral will deal one damage each time an instant or sorcery is cast and with infinite loops comes infinite damage.

Enduring Scalelord

When talking about infinite combos, most people think about life or mana, but infinite counters are also a thing. Perhaps the easiest card to make this kind of combo work is Enduring Scalelord. It has a simple ability: whenever a creature gains a +1/+1 counter, Enduring Scalelord also gains one.

Unless you’re playing a singleton format, you can play two of them to start an infinite loop of counters. And if you are playing singleton, all you need is to replicate it like with Altered Ego, Clone, etc. The loop is actually, unstoppably infinite, but you’d need to stop it eventually if you want to continue playing. You may just say they each have a +million/+million counters to end the madness.

Yore-Tiller Nephilim, Medomai the Ageless, and Viscera Seer

  • Yore-Tiller Nephilim
  • Medomai the Ageless
  • Viscera Seer

This is one of those combos that give you infinite turns, but it’s kinda tricky. The combo is built around Yore-Tiller Nephilim, Medomai the Ageless, and Viscera Seer (or any creature with a sacrifice a creature ability). Medomai has an incredible ability which allows you to take an extra turn if it deals combat damage to a player, but it can’t be declared attacker during the extra turn.

So, you sacrifice Medomai with Viscera Seer’s ability during your extra turn and attack with Yore-Tiller Nephilim, which brings Medomai back to the battlefield, tapped and attacking. Since Medomai will once again hit your opponent, you get another turn. You can repeat this as long as you want. You should keep in mind that Medomai has to hit your opponent for you to get that extra turn. You can use something like Sleep to tap your opponent’s creatures or Deepchannel Mentor so it can’t be blocked.

Selvala, Heart of the Wilds and Freed from the Real

  • Selvala, Heart of the Wilds
  • Freed from the Real

Infinite mana is always welcome, and this one is really easy. All you need is Selvala, Heart of the Wilds, Freed from the Real, and a creature with at least three power. Selvala can tap for one green mana to add mana equal to the greatest power among creatures you control and then you untap it for one blue mana thanks to Freed from the Real. If you have a creature with at least three power, you’ll always gain more than you’re spending.

Grand Architect and Pili-Pala

  • Grand Architect
  • Pili-Pala

Grand Architect and Pili-Pala is used by a lot of players in various formats and is perhaps the most commonly known infinite mana combo. When you activate Grand Architect’s first ability, Pili-Pala becomes a blue creature and, with the Architect’s second ability, you can tap it for two colorless mana. You can then use Pili-Pala’s ability with this two mana to gain one mana of any color and repeat the loop as many times you want.

Riku of Two Reflections and Palinchron

  • Riku of Two Reflections
  • Palinchron

This one is both an infinite mana and infinite token combo. If you have Riku of Two Reflections on the field, when you play Palinchron, you can choose to copy it. Since Palinchron untaps all of your lands, you can then return it to your hand with its ability and play it again to make an infinite number of tokens. If you have seven lands, you’ll also spend six mana to gain seven mana each turn, providing you with infinite mana.

Famished Paladin and Sorin, Vengeful Bloodlord

  • Famished Paladin
  • Sorin, Vengeful Bloodlord

It might take a while to put this combo in place, but if your opponent doesn’t stop it in time, you get both infinite life and damage. Sorin, Vengeful Bloodlord provides your creatures with lifelink during your turn and Famished Paladin can untap whenever you gain life. All you need is to equip him with a simple Sorcerer’s Wand and he can deal damage and untap for infinite damage (and life, as if it matters at this point). It’s reasonably cheap, so you can use it competitively.

Duskmantle Guildmage and Mindcrank

  • Duskmantle Guildmage
  • Mindcrank

MTG is such a marvelously broken game that you can defeat your opponent with just seven mana. Duskmantle Guildmage has two abilities: the first one makes your opponent loses one life each time a card is put in their graveyard, and the second puts the top two cards of their library into their graveyard. Meanwhile, Mindcrank makes it so your opponent has to put a number of cards in their graveyard equal to the damage they receive. This triggers an infinite loop of damage and mill, so congratulations! You just made someone hate you.

Spike Feeder and Archangel of Thune

  • Spike Feeder
  • Archangel of Thune

This combo saw some play in Modern, but it takes a while to start and is relatively easy to prevent. Spike Feeder comes to play with two +1/+1 counters on it, and you can remove one of them to gain 2 life. Archangel of Thune puts a +1/+1 counter on each creature you control whenever you gain life, which means infinite life and infinite counters on creatures you have on the battlefield. Other than Spike Feeder, of course.

Lion’s Eye Diamond and Auriok Salvagers

  • Lion's Eye Diamond
  • Auriok Salvagers

Lion’s Eye Diamond is a well-known artifact for infinite combos and there are multiple ways to use it, but I’ll stick to just one. This one works with Auriok Salvagers, which allows you to return Lion’s Eye Diamond from your graveyard. Each time you sacrifice Lion’s Eye Diamond, you get three mana of any color and you spend two to bring it back, essentially giving you infinite mana of any colors.

But you still need to find a way to draw some cards to actually damage your opponent or have a mana sink to use to convert your infinite mana into something useful, like Pyrite Spellbomb, which you can use with Auriok Salvagers to bring back and sacrifice infinitely since you have infinite mana.

Time Vault and Voltaic Key

  • Time Vault
  • Voltaic Key

Anyone who plays Vintage frequently has probably come across this combo at least once. Although it’s banned in EDH and Legacy and restricted in Vintage, it would be a shame to not mention it when talking about infinite combos. The fame comes from its simplicity and effectiveness: Time Vault taps to take an extra turn and you need to skip a turn to untap it. However, you can solve this problem with Voltaic Key since it allows you to untap Time Vault, take an extra turn, repeat it infinitely and basically win the game since your opponent will have no chance to play.

Hushwing Gryff, Wormfang Manta, and Conjurer’s Closet

  • Hushwing Gryff
  • Wormfang Manta
  • Conjurer's Closet

Taking infinite turns is always welcome, so here’s another one. Hushwing Gryff prevents creatures from triggering their abilities when they enter the battlefield, so you won’t have to skip a turn when Wormfang Manta comes into play. But, when you exile it with Conjurer’s Closet and have it come back, you get to take an extra turn. Rinse and repeat until you win the game.

Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind and Curiosity

  • Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind
  • Curiosity

Sometimes, dealing infinite damage is just too easy to be called fair. Niv-Mizzet has a couple of ways to make it work, but the concept is very simple. Niv-Mizzet, the Firemind deals 1 damage to your opponent whenever you draw a card. If you enchant him with Curiosity, you draw another card and create an infinite loop. This also works with Tandem Lookout or Ophidian Eye.

Time Sieve and Thopter Assembly

  • Time Sieve
  • Thopter Assembly

You need a solid mana base to make this one work since you have to cast Thopter Assembly each turn. Time Sieve needs to be on the battlefield first, and when you begin your upkeep with Thopter Assembly as the only Thopter on the battlefield, it will create five 1/1 tokens, which you will use as sacrifices to your Time Sieve. Thopter Assembly returns to your hand, you cast it again, continue as long as you want. You only need a couple of non-Thopter creatures or pretty much any way of ending your opponent, but it shouldn’t be that difficult at this point.

Enter the Infinite and Omniscience

  • Enter the Infinite
  • Omniscience

An infinite draw and cast combo that can only be prevented by a solid counterspell, or death is inevitable. With Omniscience, you’re able to cast spells from your hand without paying their mana costs. Enter the Infinite allows you to draw your entire library, which means that you can just throw your library at your opponent and say, “I win.”

Personal Favorite: Mindslaver and Academy Ruins

  • Mindslaver
  • Academy Ruins

As far as infinite combos go, this one is devilishly fun for me, and you’ll soon learn why. It requires some mana to work but is literally unstoppable unless you decide to stop it. Sacrificing Mindslaver allows you to take your opponent’s next turn. This alone makes it a powerful card, but if you also add Academy Ruins, you can tap it on your upkeep to put it back on the top of your library. Then you draw it on your turn, repeat the process, and play the game alone. It might reduce the number of friends you have, but you can’t deny it’s a great combo.

The Combo’s Over

Like I said earlier, there are just too many infinite combos in MTG to mention all of them. It’s a complex game, with complex mechanics and an outstanding number of cards to choose from, so it’s highly possible that there are some combos still undiscovered. If you think there are some combos missing that I should have mentioned, let us know in the comments below!

MTGMTG cardsMTG combosMTG infinite combos

Sours: https://draftsim.com/mtg-infinite-combos/


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