Pictures of suzuki samurais

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The Suzuki Samurai: History, Generations, Models

All things Suzuki Samurai on Automobile.

Suzuki Samurai Essential History

The Roots of the Samurai

The Samurai was the first four-wheeled vehicle Suzuki sold in the U.S., but its history begins nearly 20 years before the plucky little 4x4 made its way across the Pacific. In 1968, Japan's Hope Motor Company introduced a small kei-class 4x4 with a 359cc Mitsubishi engine called the ON360. Suzuki bought Hope and developed the ON360 into the 1970 LJ10 ("Light Jeep"), also known as the Jimny.

Suzuki introduced the second-generation Jimny in 1981, and in 1985 it began exporting the Jimny to the U.S. as a 1986 model. Badged as the Samurai, the U.S. version had a carbureted 1.3-liter overhead-cam four-cylinder delivering 63 horsepower and 74-lb-ft of torque. It was noisy and slow—MotorTrend clocked it to 60 mph in 16.9 seconds, with a quarter-mile time of 20.47 seconds at 64.5 mph—but good fun around town, and off-road it was nearly unstoppable, with its primary limitation being its street-spec tires. Manual-locking front hubs were standard, with auto-lockers available as a dealer-installed option.

Suzuki Samurai Success

With a base price of $6,550, the Suzuki Samurai was two-thirds of the price of the new-for-1987 Jeep Wrangler. Aided by cute "Beep, beep, hi!" commercials, it was an instant hit. Suzuki originally planned to import 1,200 Samurais per month in its first year, but wound up selling 47,000 for the year, giving the Samurai the best first-year sales of any Japanese vehicle to that date. It took just more than a year and half for sales to hit the 100,000 mark, and by mid-1988 Americans were buying 8,000 Samurais per month.

Suzuki introduced an updated Samurai in 1988 as a "1988½" model. Softer springs, revised shock absorbers, and a thicker front anti-roll bar helped to ease the Samurai's rough ride, while a slightly shorter fifth-gear ratio improved highway performance. Mindful of the Volkswagen Beetle's success through revision rather than redesign, styling changes were limited to a new grille and wheels on the outside and new gauges, steering wheel, and seats for the interior. That same year, Suzuki introduced the slightly larger 1989 Sidekick 4x4, also sold by General Motors as the Geo Tracker, to sell alongside the Samurai.

The Consumer Reports Samurai Rollover Debacle

But 1988 was to be the Samurai's annus horribilis. A strong yen required Suzuki to raise the price to $8,495, which cooled sales, but the effect of price was nothing compared to the Consumer Reports debacle. After an employee of CR owner Consumers Union rolled a test car in normal driving, the popular magazine gave the Samurai an "unacceptable" rating, saying it "easily rolls over in turns." The company showed reporters a video of the Samurai tipping onto outriggers fitted by CU in a 40-mph crash-avoidance test and urged NHTSA to issue a recall. NHTSA refused.

Regardless, as a result of the CR report and its extensive media coverage, Samurai sales plummeted, and Suzuki for the first time had to offer cash rebates to keep the Samurai selling. The little 4x4 became the butt of jokes: "Have you seen the 1989 Samurai? It has a sunroof on the floor." Suzuki sued Consumers Union in 1996, alleging the problem occurred when the test was modified to induce a rollover, though Suzuki's own internal correspondence revealed concern about the Samurai's propensity to tip. The lawsuit was settled out of court in 2004.

Samurai Dies Here, Lives Elsewhere

Despite those mortal wounds, the Suzuki Samurai soldiered on with few changes. The 1990 Samurai got throttle-body fuel injection, with a corresponding bump to 68 hp, and Suzuki offered a two-wheel-drive version between 1991 and 1993. The company removed the rear seat after 1994, an expedient way to conform to a requirement for rear-seat shoulder belts, which the Samurai lacked. The last model year for the Samurai in the U.S. was 1995.

Despite its death in the American market, the Suzuki Jimny carried on elsewhere. Suzuki introduced a third-generation model in 1998, and after a 20-year run, the fourth-gen Jimny debuted in 2018; it remains on sale throughout the world to this day.

Suzuki Samurai Highlights

Suzuki was one of the first importers to recognize the importance of customization to American buyers. Before the Samurai went on sale in 1985, Suzuki introduced a catalog full of accessories, which were to be displayed at the dealerships in a "personalization center".

The Samurai's success took Suzuki by surprise. The company had planned a slow rollout, setting up dealerships in California in November 1985, Florida and Georgia in December, and then staging a slow roll-out to other states during the next three years. But initial sales were so strong that Suzuki rushed to expand its sales network throughout the country.

Though the Samurai came to the U.S. in 1985 as a 1986 model, exports to Canada and Puerto Rico began earlier. Canadians also could buy a long-wheelbase version not available in the U.S.

In 2007, Chileans Gonzalo Bravo and Eduardo Canales set the record for the highest altitude achieved by a four-wheel vehicle when they drove their modified 1986 Suzuki Samurai up the Ojos del Salado volcano to an altitude of 21,942 feet. The previous record of 21,804 feet was set by a Jeep Wrangler; the Jeep team left a sign that said "Jeep parking only—all others don't make it up here, anyway." Bravo and Canales brought the sign back down with them. A Unimog broke the record again in 2020 when it climbed 21,962 feet up the same volcano.

Suzuki Samurai Buying Tips

Thanks largely to its insanely-good off-road abilities, the Suzuki Samurai is now a prized collectible, though many examples have been modified, so finding one in as-delivered condition can be difficult. If possible, opt for a non-modified Samurai, as they are less likely to have been subjected to off-road abuse.

Buying a previously modified Samurai, on the other hand, can be a huge cost-saver compared to making the modifications yourself, but you are then subject to the quality of modifications done by others. Check carefully for signs of shoddy work.

Inspect the underbody carefully. Besides rust, you should look for dents, scrapes, or mud in hard-to-reach places, all evidence that the truck did hard off-road time.

Some Samurai owners swapped out the 1.3-liter engine for the more powerful 1.6-liter fuel-injected engine from the Sidekick. Though the swap does not require alterations to frame or body, it is not a simple bolt-in substitution and requires several modifications; a poor-quality swap can cause problems down (or off) the road. Also, a Samurai with a non-stock engine may not be emissions-legal in some states, so check regulations carefully.

Among the known trouble spots: Oil leaks at the distributor, leaky brake master cylinders, bad transfer-case bushings that lock the case in neutral, brittle plastic interior parts, fiddly carburetors, and faulty engine-control modules (ECMs) on fuel-injected engines.

Suzuki Samurai Articles on Automobile

The hugely capable tiny off-roader of yesterday's dreams—and today's.

Photos of the small, rugged, Jeep-ishly cute throwback SUV.

Japanese body kits can turn the Jimny into any one of several classic off-roaders.

Suzuki Samurai Recent Auctions

Suzuki Samurai Quick Facts

  • First year of U.S. sales: 1985 (1986 model year)
  • Last year of U.S. sales: 1995
  • Total sold in U.S.: 206,419
  • Original price (base): $6,550
  • Engine: 1.3L SOHC I-4/63-68 hp
  • Typical auction price range (2020): $7,500-$10,000
  • Characteristic feature: Tiny size, durable and capable 4x4

Suzuki Samurai FAQ

Does Suzuki still make the Samurai?

Yes, sort of. Suzuki still sells the Jimny (the Samurai's name outside of North America) in several markets, and the 4x4 is now in its fourth generation. The Samurai name has been retired.

Is the Suzuki Samurai a good car?

The Samurai is an exceptionally capable off-roader that is both durable and reliable, hence its continued popularity and high resale values. However, as a daily driver it's slow, noisy, and not particularly comfortable, with 1986-88 models having a firmer ride. Though Samurai fans will argue about the merits of the Consumer Reports case, the Samurai is more prone to tipping over in sudden swerves than most 4x4s.

What years did Suzuki make the Samurai?

Suzuki sold the Samurai in North America between late 1985 and 1995, with sales beginning earlier in Canada and Puerto Rico. The Jimny on which the Samurai was based was originally introduced in Japan in 1970, and continues in production to this day.

Why did Suzuki stop making the Samurai?

The Samurai was exceptionally popular when it first came to the U.S., but a 1988 story by Consumer Reports citing an alleged propensity to roll over killed its sales, which slowed to a trickle and led to a 1995 withdrawal from the U.S. market. Suzuki sued in 1996, accusing CR of manipulating the test to induce a rollover; the suit was eventually settled out of court. By that time, Suzuki had brought the larger and wider Sidekick to market, and it effectively replaced the Samurai.

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1993 Suzuki Samurai Photos

Unlike other websites and magazines, our ratings are not based solely on a singular road test, but rather a more encompassing batch of criteria: quality, safety, comfort, performance, fuel economy, reliability history and value. When comparing vehicles using our Rating System, it's important to note that the rating earned by each vehicle correlates only to the models within its class. For example, a compact car cannot be compared to a SUV—They are different vehicles altogether.

You can interpret our ratings in the following way:

5-Star: Outstanding vehicle. Only the most exceptional vehicles achieve this rating.

4-Star: Very Good vehicle. Very good and close to being the best vehicle in its class.

3-Star: Good vehicle. Decent, but not quite the best. Often affordable, but lacking key features found in vehicles of the same class.

2-Star: Below average vehicle. Not recommended, and lacking attributes a car buyer would come to expect for the price.

1-Star: Poor vehicle. Simply does not deserve to be on the road.

Sours: https://www.carsdirect.com/1993/suzuki/samurai/pictures
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Suzuki SJ413 / Samurai

The Suzuki Jimnyis a line of SUVs from Suzuki. The line started in 1968 and is still running. The history of Suzuki four-wheel-drive cars dates to 1968. Suzuki bought former Japanese automaker Hope Motor Company which had introduced fifteen small off-road vehicles called the HopeStar ON360. The first Suzuki-branded 4-whee

l drive, the LJ10, was introduced in 1970. The LJ10 had a 359 cc air-cooled, two-stroke, in-line two-cylinder engine. The liquid-cooled LJ20 was introduced in 1972 with the cooling changed due to newly enacted emission regulations, and it gained 3 hp. In 1975, Suzuki complemented the LJ20 with the LJ50, which had a larger 539 cc, two-stroke, in-line three-cylinder engine and bigger differentials. This was originally targeted at the Australian market, but more exports soon followed.

 
 Suzuki SJ413 / Samurai

The new Jimny was released in 1998, and now bears the same name in all markets. The 1998 release used the G13BB EFI engine, replaced by the M13AA EFI engine in 2001 and the M13AA VVT engine in 2005, in conjunction with a minor interior redesign.

Suzuki Jimny SJ413 / Samurai

JA51 Jimny 1300 In 1984, the SJ was revamped with the launch of the SJ413 (internal model code JA51). The Jimny SJ413 / Samurai included a larger 1.3 liter 4-cylinder engine, 5-speed manual transmission and power brakes all around. The body and interior were also redesigned, with a new dashboard, seats, and grille. The SJ410 remained in production for various other markets with the old specifications.

The SJ-Series was introduced to the United States (Puerto Rico (SJ-410) and Canada earlier) in 1985 for the 1986 model year. It was priced at just $6200 and 47,000 were sold in its first year. The Samurai had a 1.3 liter, 63 hp (47 kW), 4-cylinder engine and was available as a convertible or a hardtop. The Suzuki Samurai became intensely popular within the serious 4WD community for its good off road performance and reliability compared to other 4WDs of the time. This is due to the fact that while very compact and light, it is a real 4WD vehicle equipped with a transfer case switchable 4WD and low range. Its lightness makes it a very nimble off roader less prone to sinking in softer ground than heavier ones. It is also considered a great beginner off-roader due to its simple design and ease of engine and suspension modifications.

The 1988.5 model Jimny SJ413 / Samurai was re-tuned for better on-road use in the United States. This revision included softer suspension settings and a larger anti-sway bar to reduce body roll. A lower 5th gear (.865:1 vs the earlier .795:1) increased engine rpm and power on the highway, and improved dashboard and seats made the Samurai more comfortable.

A new 1.3 4-cylinder engine with throttle-body fuel injection was introduced with 66 hp (49 kW) in September 1991.The Samurai was supplemented in Canada and the United States markets in 1989 by the Suzuki Sidekick, which eventually replaced the Samurai in 1995. The rear seat was removed from 1994 and 1995 Samurai models with rear shoulder safety belts becoming mandatory, and the partial roll cage not having the required mounting provisions, unlike the larger Jeep Wrangler . Low sales and pending stricter safety legislation prompted the withdrawal of the Samurai from Canada and the United States markets after 1995.

The Jimny SJ413/Samurai had a longer history in the rest of the world. Australian built JA51s were sold as either Suzuki Sierra or Holden Drover, while those built in Thailand are called Suzuki Caribbean. The Caribbean has also been available as the "Caribbean Sporty", a unique LWB double cab pickup.

Due to various trade obstacles for Japanese cars, Spanish Santana Motors (in addition to the SJ410) began local production of the SJ413 in 1986. The Santana built SJs had softer springs for an improved on-road ride, color coordinated interiors with cloth seats and carpeted floors, all to broaden appeal to those who did not intend to off-road the vehicle. In 1989 it received some optical as well as chassis updates and received the "Samurai" nameplate. Santana built Samurais did not benefit from the updated coil sprung chassis introduced in 1998, instead receiving a facelift (new grille, more rounded bumpers) specific to European and neighboring markets. Around the same time, Santana also developed a version which used PSA's XUD 9 1.9-litre turbodiesel, producing 63 hp. Top speed was 130 km/h. Spanish Samurai production ended in 2003.

The Jimny SJ413 / Samurai was sold in Colombia and Venezuela as Chevrolet Samurai, assembled in Bogotá, Colombia by General Motors Colmotores. In other South American markets (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Paraguay and Uruguay) it was sold as the Suzuki Samurai. Long wheelbase models were not offered in the Mercosur.

In Asia the SJ/Samurai was sold under a few different names. In Thailand it was called the Suzuki Caribbean. The Thai market also received a special version called the "Suzuki Caribbean Sporty", a pickup with an extended cab with a small rear seat best suited for occasional use. The SJ410 was also assembled in Indonesia, where it was marketed as the Katana. Later Katanas received square headlights. The Katana was also, surprisingly, used as a basis for an Indonesian-built, thirties' style kit-car called the Marvia Classic

Sours: http://autoinfooke.blogspot.com/2012/01/suzuki-sj413-samurai-pictures-gallery.html

Year of Suzuki Samurai

Jimny 8

Jimny 550

SJ40 Jimny 1000

The SJ410 was introduced in 1982 as an updated version of the LJ80. It used a larger version of that LJ's 1.0 liter 4-cylinder engine. This engine produced 45hp (34kW) and it had a top speed of 68mph (109km/ h).

A 4-speed manual transmission was standard, as were non-power assisted drum brakes front and rear. The SJ-410 came as a half-door convertible, pickup truck, 2-door hardtop, raised-roof hardtop, and no-glass hardtop. The SJ was produced in Spain by Santana Motors in their Linares, Jaén factory and sold as a domestic vehicle in Europe due to its over 60% native parts.

JA51 Jimny 1300

In 1984, the SJ was revamped with the launch of the SJ413. The SJ413 included a larger 1.3 liter 4-cylinder engine, 5-speed manual transmission and power brakes all around. The body and interior were also redesigned, with a new dashboard, seats, and grille. The SJ410 remained in production through 1985 with the old specifications.

The SJ-Series was introduced to the United States (Puerto Rico (SJ-410) and Canada earlier) in 1985 for the 1986 model year. It was priced at just $6200 and 47,000 were sold in its first year. The Samurai had a 8V 1.3 liter, 63hp (47kW), 4-cylinder engine and was available as a convertible or a hardtop. The Suzuki Samurai became intensely popular within the serious 4wd community for its extreme off road performance and reliability compared to other 4wds of the time.

The Samurai is also considered a great beginner 4wd due to its simple design and ease of modifications with engine swaps and suspension upgrades.

The 1988.5 model Samurai was re-tuned for better on-road use in the United States. This revision included softer suspension settings and a larger anti-sway bar to reduce body roll. A lower 5th gear (.865:1 vs the earlier .795:1) increased engine rpm and power on the highway, and improved dashboard and seats made the Samurai more comfortable.



 » Read More About Suzuki SamuraiSours: https://www.cars-directory.net/gallery/suzuki/samurai/

Samurais pictures of suzuki

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The Suzuki Jimny (aka Samurai) Story

You know, she whispered softly, clinging to him with her whole body, while you were sleeping carefree, he pestered me all evening. There will probably be a bruise on my leg. Here.

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Marina arranged everything, she went to Lena's house and nursed the children, and Lena had fun with me at my house. From a bed point of view, I can't say anything about Lena Turning around the room, I felt a sharp bang on the butt from which a new. Wave of excitement rushed over me. Having passed into the room I sat down on the sofa, leaned back, he stood in front of me, bending over, he again began to kiss me while unbuttoning his.



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